103 episodes

GSAPP Conversations offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice through discussions on the current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests from emerging and well-established practices. Hosted by Columbia GSAPP’s Dean Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the School’s influential faculty and alumni, and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

GSAPP Conversations Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

    • Design
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

GSAPP Conversations offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice through discussions on the current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests from emerging and well-established practices. Hosted by Columbia GSAPP’s Dean Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the School’s influential faculty and alumni, and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

    Learning From Alumni: Building a Successful Firm

    Learning From Alumni: Building a Successful Firm

    Joshua Jih Pan, FAIA in Conversation with Johnny Chiu.
    In episode #94, founder of J.C. Architecture Johnny Chiu (‘06 MSAAD) speaks with Joshua Jih Pan ('67 MARCH), founder of J.J. Pan & Partners.
    Based in Taipei with additional offices in Shanghai, Beijing, and Xiamen, J.J. Pan & Partners is an architectural and planning firm dedicated to providing creative solutions in the design and planning of human environments. J.C. Architecture is a multidisciplinary design firm based in New York City and Taipei whose projects range from architecture to interior, industrial, visual, and jewelry design.
    During the conversation, they discuss Pan’s educational background (including his time at GSAPP) and the steps he took to establish his studio as one of the largest, and most successful firms in Taiwan. Pan stresses the importance of taking advantage of every opportunity to showcase quality and relevant design, regardless of project scale. He also encourages early career architects to recognize the value of their work and charge fair fees for their services. Finally, he shares his vision for the future of architecture in Taiwan which prioritizes sustainability and is inclusive of aging populations.

    • 28 min
    Untapped New York Explores Upper Manhattan

    Untapped New York Explores Upper Manhattan

    This Spring, Untapped New York is collaborating with Columbia GSAPP to create a mini-series of podcasts designed to share architectural and historic highlights of Columbia University’s neighborhood and surrounding New York City communities for listeners who are unable to travel to the city in person at this time.
    In this second installment, Michelle Young and Justin Rivers of Untapped New York explore neighborhoods in Upper Manhattan. They head from Morningside Heights to Harlem, Hamilton Heights, Washington Heights, and Inwood. Along the way, they point out culinary and cultural highlights of each neighborhood, including NYC’s largest slice at Koronet Pizza in Morningside Heights, Harlem’s Apollo Theater, the Audubon Mural Project in Hamilton Heights, and the many parks and views of Washington Heights. We also hear from Columbia affiliated residents of Harlem and Washington Heights who tell us about why they love their neighborhoods.
    You can learn more about Untapped New York at www.untappedcities.com (http://www.untappedcities.com).

    • 18 min
    Untapped New York Explores Morningside Heights

    Untapped New York Explores Morningside Heights

    This Spring, Untapped New York collaborated with Columbia GSAPP to create a mini-series of podcast episodes designed to welcome incoming students to the GSAPP family. In case you missed this episode as part of GSAPP’s Virtual Open House, we wanted to re-share it with you here!
    Throughout the series, we explore architecturally interesting and historic New York City neighborhoods that house Columbia University’s campus and surrounding communities. This is our first of three conversations specifically produced for the School.
    In this episode, Michelle Young and Justin Rivers of Untapped New York discuss the neighborhood of Morningside Heights, which is home to Columbia University’s Morningside Campus and to GSAPP. Michelle Young is GSAPP faculty, alum ('12 MSUP), and founder of Untapped New York. Justin Rivers, Chief Experience Officer at Untapped New York, will share five hidden spots including Alma Mater, the Guastavino Dome at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Riverside Church’s Labyrinth, Ulysses S. Grant’s Tomb, and the meeting of 125th and 129th Streets.
    You can learn more about Untapped New York at www.untappedcities.com (http://www.untappedcities.com).

    • 32 min
    Memories of the Resistance: A Spatial Investigation

    Memories of the Resistance: A Spatial Investigation

    Sophie Hochhäusl in Conversation with Emmanuel Olunkwa.
    In episode #91, CCCP student Emmanuel Olunkwa speaks with architectural historian Sophie Hochhäusl. Hochhäusl is an Assistant Professor for Architectural History and Theory at the University of Pennsylvania. Her scholarly work centers on modern architecture and urban culture in Austria, Germany, and the United States, with a focus on the history of social movements, gender studies, and environmental history.
    Today, Austrian architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky (1897-2000) has been widely recognized as one of the most significant female figures in modern design who worked in Austria, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Turkey in the 1920s and 1930s. These decades of professional work were marked by a drastic break between 1940 and 1945, when Schütte-Lihotzky was interned for her participation in the Communist resistance against the Nazi regime. Her recollections from the years of internment became the subject of the 1984 German-language book “Erinnerungen aus dem Widerstand (Memories of the Resistance).”
    In this episode, Sophie Hochhäusl discusses her book “Memories of the Resistance: Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky and the Architecture of Collective Dissidence, 1919-1989,” which explores the architect's book as a critical historical document that exemplifies the spatialization of organized dissent in the 1940s. It provides a glimpse into resistance as lived practice and how dissent became activated by solidarity and collective action.
    The episode was recorded following Sophie Hochhäusl’s Detlef Mertins Lecture on the Histories of Modernity at GSAPP on February 24, 2020.

    • 18 min
    Rethinking Equitable Development

    Rethinking Equitable Development

    Marc Norman in Conversation with Kate Ascher.
    In episode #90, faculty Kate Ascher speaks with Marc Norman, Associate Professor of Practice in Urban and Regional Planning at University of Michigan’s Taubman College, and founder of consulting firm Ideas and Actions. Teaching courses in real estate finance and economic development, Marc Norman also advises municipal, private, and non-profit clients on housing and development. Kate Ascher is the Milstein Professor of Urban Development at Columbia GSAPP, where she teaches real estate, infrastructure, and urban planning courses.
    During the conversation, they discuss land use and cost as it relates to housing and street real estate. Using New York City as an example, they also explore the need for a multifaceted strategy that involves development, innovative finance, and community engagement in the reimagination of public housing. Marc Norman makes the case for further experimentation on a city and state level that has the ability to scale up and lead us into the future. The episode was recorded prior to Marc Norman’s lecture at GSAPP on March 2nd, 2020.

    • 24 min
    The Green New Deal: Shaping a Public Imagination

    The Green New Deal: Shaping a Public Imagination

    Kim Stanley Robinson in Conversation with Benjamin Eckersley and Isaac Kim.
    In episode #89, Columbia GSAPP Master of Architecture student Isaac Kim and Columbia School of the Arts MFA student Benjamin Eckersley speak with author Kim Stanley Robinson. Robinson is a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. He is the author of more than twenty books, including the Mars trilogy and the critically acclaimed 2312, The Years of Rice and Salt, and New York 2140.
    During the conversation, Robinson embraces the proposal for a Green New Deal and connects his science fiction writing to the growing political movement. He discusses how imagined scenario building and alternative societies might empower communities to be more proactive in responding to the reality of climate change. He also shares with us his long-term interest in architecture and how the built environment provides contextual and historical details in his own fictional writing.
    The episode was recorded prior to Robinson’s participation at a Columbia event on February 18, 2020. The discussion was organized by the Earth Institute’s Initiative on Communication and Sustainability, the Brown Institute for Media Innovation, and the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture, where it forms part of the ongoing project, “Power: Infrastructure in America.” For more information, including an essay by Robinson on the Green New Deal, see power.buellcenter.columbia.edu.

    • 21 min

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