30 episodes

The WP Tavern Jukebox is a podcast for the WordPress community. We interview people who are pushing change in how WordPress evolves. Plugins, Blocks, Themes, Community, Events, Accessibility and Diversity; we try to cover all the bases. Subscribe to be updated when we bring you new content.

Jukebox WordPress Tavern

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The WP Tavern Jukebox is a podcast for the WordPress community. We interview people who are pushing change in how WordPress evolves. Plugins, Blocks, Themes, Community, Events, Accessibility and Diversity; we try to cover all the bases. Subscribe to be updated when we bring you new content.

    #38 – Paul Bearne on How Working With WordPress Allows for Different Lifestyles

    #38 – Paul Bearne on How Working With WordPress Allows for Different Lifestyles

    On the podcast today we have Paul Bearne.



    Paul is a WordPress enthusiast who loves to come up with ways to make WordPress do things it doesn’t normally do. Having engaged with WordPress almost from the start, he specialises in the creation of highly performant, scalable, accessible and SEO friendly code.



    He has contributed consistently to WordPress Core since version 3.9 as well as setting up a local meetup and speaking at WordCamps. He is currently being sponsored by XWP to work on Core as part of their Core initiatives.



    In the podcast today Paul talks about the many ways in which it’s possible to work within the WordPress ecosystem. He’s tried many of them out over the years.



    Many of the jobs in and around the WordPress space require only a few things, access to power and internet and a computer. The geographical constraints for work are often non-existent. If you have the skills, can get online and put in the hours, then you might be good to go. The pandemic brought this distributed working model to the masses, as more and more organisations realised the benefits that working in this way affords.



    Paul talks through some of the different ways that you can work and draws out the benefits and drawbacks that they have. How can you find the work and what can you do to make sure that it’s as stable as it can be?



    If you’re already a remote worker, much of this conversation will resonate with you, but if you’re not, but are curious about your options, this podcast will be of interest.



    Typically, when we record the podcast, there’s not a lot of background noise, but that’s not always the case with these WordCamp Europe interviews. We were competing against crowds and the air-conditioning. In this episode both Paul and I wore face masks which you can also detect. Whilst the podcasts are more than listenable, I hope that you understand that the vagaries of the real world were at play.

    • 29 min
    #37 – Jonathan Wold on How Partnerships Might Help Your WordPress Business

    #37 – Jonathan Wold on How Partnerships Might Help Your WordPress Business

    On the podcast today we have Jonathan Wold.



    Jonathan joined the WordPress community seventeen years ago, and he’s been here ever since.



    He likes to think about WordPress as an operating system for creating on the open web, and invests his time and energy into growing the WordPress ecosystem.



    With that in mind he gave a talk at the recent WordCamp Europe called "Growing in WordPress through partnerships", in which he laid out his thoughts on how WordPress companies can enable greater growth by joining with other, like minded companies.



    There’s a lot of WordPress products out there, and whilst building a product can be a challenge, getting that product into the market, gaining growth and recognition can be another hurdle altogether.



    Jonathan talks today about how strategic partnerships can, in some cases, make the job of selling a product easier and more rewarding.



    We talk about how the WordPress ecosystem has grown over time, and how discoverability of your product is harder now that it used to be.



    We discuss the fact that WordPress has a heritage of solopreneurs who might not be as good at marketing as they are at coding, and how joining forces with partners can make it easier to succeed in the marketplace.



    Are partnerships for everyone, or are they only for a subset of companies? How do you go about finding a partner and what are the ways that you can ensure that you’re working with the companies which offer the most benefit to you and your customers?



    Typically, when we record the podcast, there’s not a lot of background noise, but that’s not always the case with these WordCamp Europe interviews. We were competing against crowds and the air-conditioning. Whilst the podcasts are more than listenable, I hope that you understand that the vagaries of the real world were at play.

    • 28 min
    #36 – Sean Blakeley on Transitioning a Large Agency Over to Gutenberg

    #36 – Sean Blakeley on Transitioning a Large Agency Over to Gutenberg

    On the podcast today we have Sean Blakeley.



    Sean works for a large agency called Americaneagle.com, a platform agnostic organisation working with enterprise clients on a wide variety of projects.



    After years of experiments with different approaches and collaborations between designers and developers, their team has begun to rely heavily on block patterns, and they’ve found it is greatly increasing their productivity. It’s fair to say that block patterns have revolutionised the team's approach to the entire design process.



    In case you’ve not explored block patterns, they are collections of blocks which can be built by anyone. With thoughtful design, these blocks can be repurposed across pages and even different websites. Build once, deploy everywhere.



    We talk about how and why Sean’s team decided to jump in early with block patterns. When they did, this was a somewhat risky strategy. There was no guarantee that patterns would begin to be widely adopted, but this strategy is now starting to bear fruit. It’s allowing their team to work with their clients in new and unexpected ways.



    Clients are now working more closely with the American Eagle team in what Sean describes as less ‘impress us’ and more ‘collaborate with us’. It’s fostering a closer relationship with clients which encourages them to use the block editor and patterns and have some ownership in the process.



    It’s an interesting episode, and if you’re curious about how you can start to use blocks and patterns with your clients, there’s sure to be something here for you.



    Typically, when we record the podcast, there’s not a lot of background noise, but that’s not always the case with these WordCamp Europe interviews. We were competing against crowds and the air-conditioning. Whilst the podcasts are more than listenable, I hope that you understand that the vagaries of the real world were at play.



    Useful links.



    Block Patterns Directory



    Create a new pattern



    Openverse

    • 32 min
    #35 – Akshat Choudhary on the State of WordPress Security

    #35 – Akshat Choudhary on the State of WordPress Security

    On the podcast today we have Akshat Choudhary.



    Akshat is the Founder and CEO of BlogVault, MalCare, WP Remote and Airlift. These WordPress plugins allow their customers to build, manage and maintain their WordPress websites.



    He’s based in Bangalore, India and we begin the podcast talking about the state of the WordPress community there. We know that there’s a lot of WordPress products and services coming out of India, but are there events and meetups like we find elsewhere? We also talk about why Akshat sees it as useful to bring himself and other members of his team so far to attend WordCamp Europe. What’s in it for them and what’s their approach to the return on this investment?



    We then move on to talk about Akshat’s journey creating products in the WordPress space. It’s interesting to note that whilst Akshat is clearly great at creating products people wish to use, he’s also willing to admit that much of his success can be attributed to serendipity.



    We then get into a discussion of the security landscape and how the products that Akshat and his team make enable site owners to rest more easily. It’s all about backups, site monitoring and firewalls. We go into some of the technical details of how the products work and how they fit neatly into an agency wishing to sell care plans to their website clients.



    Are there any downsides to adding additional plugins to WordPress websites and do we run the risk of thinking that if we’ve installed some security and backup plugins, then there’s nothing to worry about? Is this a sensible position to take?



    It’s an educational episode with a warm and very amiable guest.



    Useful links.



    WP Remote



    BlogVault



    Malcare



    Airlift

    • 27 min
    #34 – Felix Arntz on WordPress and Performance

    #34 – Felix Arntz on WordPress and Performance

    On the podcast today we have Felix Arntz.



    Felix is a Developer Relations Engineer at Google and a WordPress core committer. He is the lead engineer for the Site Kit plugin for WordPress and has been a regular contributor to WordPress for several years.



    He’s also been involved in the newly created WordPress performance team which is trying to work out how WordPress can stay ahead of the performance curve.



    Despite the fact that WordPress’ share of the CMS market is very strong, third-party CMS’s like Wix and Shopify have been growing their customer base in recent years. As single platforms, they can be very focused upon performance and don’t have to worry about the possible performance issues which the plugin and theme architecture of WordPress brings. Is this something that we need to be concerned about? Are website clients beginning to ask more probing questions about performance, and is WordPress keeping up with the marketing and messaging?



    He also talks today about why it’s important for the whole WordPress community to be thinking about performance when building any website. It’s no secret that Google and other search engines are very interested in making the web faster, and future rankings could well be boosted by having a performant site. So we talk through some of the ways that this can be achieved.



    We also talk about Felix’s career, the fact that there’s an emerging industry of people who are able to work exclusively on website performance, and earn their living from this expertise. This could be in the writing of code, the optimisation of assets as well as the configuration of hosting options. Felix recommends some things which might be of use for people wishing to find out more.



    It’s an interesting conversation about an area which is going to matter more and more in the months and years to come.



    Useful links.



    Site Kit Plugin



    WordPress Performance Team kick off



    The Performance Lab plugin has been released



    Enhancing performance in an open-source CMS ecosystem

    • 27 min
    #33 – David Lockie on Why Web3 and WordPress Might Work Together

    #33 – David Lockie on Why Web3 and WordPress Might Work Together

    On the podcast today we have David Lockie.



    David is the Web3 Lead at Automattic, which is a new role. He’s trying to understand what Web3 is and how it’s going to alter the course of the internet in the future.



    You might have heard of Web3 and be confused about what it is exactly. DAOs, NFTs, smart contracts, Layer 2s and DeFi. These are all terms associated with Web3 but they’re not necessarily well understood. It’s complex. These technologies go about things in new and innovative ways. So what does it all mean?



    David’s on the podcast today to help us understand the whole concept of Web3 and how it might affect the WordPress ecosystem. What it is, how it works and why it’s useful.



    You’ve likely heard of examples of Web3 out there in the real world. Crypto currencies, people selling NFTs, and more. These may seem like interesting experiments, but not all that practical or useful for the majority of people. David wants to explain that it’s the underlying technology which is interesting here. A decentralised approach to gathering and storing data which is just beginning to find some practical applications.



    Perhaps this technology has a future which is, as yet, unimagined. We’re just waiting for the perfect implementation to take this from an intriguing, but edge case technology, to something more widely adopted and understood.



    Useful links.



    Kernel



    RabbitHole



    Blockchain Council



    British Interactive Media Association

    • 30 min

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