47 episodes

The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. On this podcast we discuss the work and lectures of Christian Schiller, interview education specialist and explain how NAPE is working for you. Our aim is to achieve a higher priority for the education of children from birth to 13. High quality learning in the early years of life is vitally important to the creation of an educated society. Young children are not simply preparing for the future, they are living a never to be repeated time of life and the best way to learn is to live.

National Association for Primary Education Mark Taylor

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The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. On this podcast we discuss the work and lectures of Christian Schiller, interview education specialist and explain how NAPE is working for you. Our aim is to achieve a higher priority for the education of children from birth to 13. High quality learning in the early years of life is vitally important to the creation of an educated society. Young children are not simply preparing for the future, they are living a never to be repeated time of life and the best way to learn is to live.

    Educational Website for Teachers - NAPE 046

    Educational Website for Teachers - NAPE 046

    Mike Aylen and Mark Taylor (chair & vice chair) chat through some of the recent developments in NAPE.


    The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children in our schools and all who work with them, be part of that voice, join us.


    All are welcome as members; Heads, Teachers, Teaching Assistants, Parents, School Governors. Inspectors, Administrators and entire School Communities.


    Members have an important voice exercised democratically. We influence public opinion and regular meetings are held with government ministers. The association is totally neutral politically.


    There are meetings of members both locally and nationally. NAPE encourages and supports local associations to be formed.


    Conferences and workshops are arranged both locally and nationally.


    The association is administered by an elected National Council meeting termly to review progress and discuss national issues. Detailed administration is delegated to an Executive Committee which reports to the Council.


    NAPE is a prominent member of the Primary Umbrella Group which brings together all organisations working in the primary sector including subject associations and unions. This is a new and rapidly developing field of work which is facilitating cooperation and partnership.


    All aspects of education are experienced by children in their primary schools and we have strong links with subject associations. We often engage in cooperative ventures with them.


     

    • 15 min
    The Idea of Freedom - NAPE 045

    The Idea of Freedom - NAPE 045

    Welcome to National Association for Primary Education podcast. On todays show you will hear a chapter from our book Christian Schiller - In His Own Words', read by Peter Cansell - NAPE Information Officer

    • 18 min
    The Social Growth of Young Children - NAPE 044

    The Social Growth of Young Children - NAPE 044

    Welcome to National Association for Primary Education podcast. On todays show you will hear the latest news including our new YouTube Channel and a chapter from our book Christian Schiller - In His Own Words', read by Peter Cansell - NAPE Information Officer


    Christian was appointed HMI in 1924 and then followed a long period of work with the schools in Liverpool where his contact with poor children and their families was a deeply formative experience. He became District Inspector and later filled this role in Worcestershire. In 1946 he became Staff Inspector for Primary Education and his influence, often in partnership with his friend Robin Tanner, HMI. Both strongly felt that as elementary schools developed into primary schools, they should have a distinctive child- centred approach. That approach means teachers drawing on children’s innate creativity so recognising the powerful learning that emerges from direct experience.


    ‘Christian Schiller in his own words’ was published by the Association from 1979. This invaluable book is still available price £5.00 from the National Office. The book and all its wisdom about teaching young children and how we can help them to learn should find a place on every teacher’s bookshelf.


    Links to the book and YouTube Channel can be found directly from our website www.nape.org.uk


    The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. This includes parents, teachers, governors and all those interested in primary education. NAPE is a non-political charity and works tirelessly to support teachers in the classroom. NAPE leads the Primary Umbrella Group of thirty primary subject associations and unions and gives teachers and schools a voice at governmental level at consultative meetings with ministers for schools.

    • 31 min
    Thank you and Merry Christmas - NAPE 043

    Thank you and Merry Christmas - NAPE 043

    Thank you so much for listening during 2019. Have a very Merry Christmas and we look forward to continuing our journey in 2020.

    • 48 sec
    Early Years with Wendy Scott - NAPE 042

    Early Years with Wendy Scott - NAPE 042

    Wendy Scott is a Froebelian early years teacher with extensive experience in the PVI sector as well as schools. Headship of a demonstration nursery school was followed by a senior lectureship at Roehampton University, where she co-ordinated the original advanced diploma in multi-professional studies.  


    Wendy has been an early years and primary inspector in London, and has worked across England as an OFSTED Registered Inspector and trainer. She led The British Association for Early Childhood Education and chaired the national Early Childhood Forum before becoming a specialist adviser to the DfES, and working abroad with the British Council and UNICEF.


    She is currently President of TACTYC, the Association for Professional Development in Early Years, and has judged the Nursery World Nursery of the Year competition since 2008. She was awarded an OBE for services to education in 2015.


    NAPE


    The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. This includes parents, teachers, governors and all those interested in primary education. NAPE is a non-political charity and works tirelessly to support teachers in the classroom as expressed in their ‘Value of Membership’ Document. NAPE leads the Primary Umbrella Group of thirty primary subject associations and unions and gives teachers and schools a voice at governmental level at consultative meetings with ministers for schools.


    For full details of how they can support you please visit their website at  nape.org.uk  (https://nape.org.uk/)


     

    • 25 min
    Handwriting with Jeremy Rowe - NAPE 041

    Handwriting with Jeremy Rowe - NAPE 041

    Handwriting


    The National Association for Primary Education are planning new handwriting workshops for primary schools. Mark Taylor talks to Jeremy Rowe about his vast experience in education and what to expect from the handwriting workshops.


    Handwriting is in the National Curriculum – is it an anachronism like 12x table? – or an important skill?


    It could be considered important for aesthetic reasons – visually pleasing; a rewarding skill, developing fine motor control, and leading to a strong personal style’. It’s also an art form.


    Quote Buzz Aldrin “No dream is too high (2108) “In this day of text messages, email and social media communications, if you really want to make an impression on someone, write a handwritten note of thanks or encouragement.”


    More important is the significant contribution to development of thinking skills. We have enough years of using keyboards, so we can now compare. Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to raise questions about whether handwriting has unique value. Children who learn to write by hand well, learn to read quicker, retain information better, and generate ideas easier.


    Scientists have long suspected the link between handwriting and memory, thought processes, creativity; handwriting boots neural activity in sectors of the brain associated with creativity; writing things down using a pen and paper has long been a trick to help spark the memory.


    “How can I tell what I think if I cannot see what I say?” (E M Forster essay “Aspects of the Novel”, written just after he’d finish Passage to India 1924).


    Recent research in cognitive psychology and neuroscience: looking at how we learn:


    Examples:


    Brain scanning has demonstrated that handwriting activities help preschoolers learn their letters.


    Writing by hand is indispensible for helping children develop a brain that reads with proficiency.


    Handwriting is a key component in improving both spelling ability and written composition.


    Grey matter volume and density correlates with higher handwriting quality, signalling more efficient neural processing.


    Writing is better for the brain than keyboarding.


    Professor Jane Medwell (leading academic in field of handwriting) says, “Handwriting is vital. Children who write by hand are better connected to their work and more engaged in learning.”


    Joyce Rankin (USA State Board for Education) “There are direct links between developing good handwriting skills at an early age and academic achievement in both literacy and numeracy as children progress though their schooling; brain imaging has actually found that handwriting activites the brain more than keyboarding because it involves more complex motor and cognitive skills.”


    By handwriting something to learn it, research says it helps to ‘etch it into the memory’. 


    Handwriting is a complex skill engaging cognitive, perceptual and motor skills simultaneously.


    Early years are especially crucial. Once children have formed counterproductive habits, they can be difficult to change. Ten or fifteen minutes daily will pay off. Start with large movements in the air to learn letter shapes; progress to patterns; families of letter; manuscript (letters not joined) then cursive (joined)


    It must be taught carefully – “illegible handwriting can have a serious impact on a child’s self-esteem” (Lyceum School brochure)


    Professor Virginia Berniger, Univ ersity of Washington investigated children in Years 2, 4 and 6. She found that they wrote more words faster and expressed more ideas when writing by hand than with a keyboard. Handwritten documents provide thoughts recorded at the speed of handwriting, a visual record of thinking, and reflective concentration (ability to think whilst writing).


    The primary school is responsible – it’s very hard to change habits after about year 4,

    • 35 min

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