124 episodes

Peopletalk is a non-profit group, comprising of British trained professional actors, writers, producers and documentary makers, who have combined their areas of expertise in order to provide a free internet audio books, anecdotal stories, social history and documentary web site.

peopletalk's Podcast Nigel Killick of peopletalk

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Peopletalk is a non-profit group, comprising of British trained professional actors, writers, producers and documentary makers, who have combined their areas of expertise in order to provide a free internet audio books, anecdotal stories, social history and documentary web site.

    GIRL ON THE TORTURE WHEEL By JEFFERSON AMES

    GIRL ON THE TORTURE WHEEL By JEFFERSON AMES

     
    GIRL ON THE TORTURE WHEEL By JEFFERSON AMES
    This 1940s detective story is an old fashioned pastiche but amusing critique of the war time American private eye genre. It is not politically correct nor dose it shun from being controversial about how the author, chose to write at the time. So, if you can listen with an open ear you might find it a humorous snapshots on times gone by.
     
    Narrated by Malcolm Clarke
    Recorded and produced by Nigel Killick
    Please click the Music link to hear more music from Dazie Mae: 
    Artist: Dazie Mae
     
    Malcolm also narrated an Englishman in Brazil
    Malcolm Clarke is an English actor who has married a Brazilian and moved to a small city called Curitiba which is the capital city of the Brazilian state of Paraná, located in southern Brazil.  In his narration  Malcolm gives a vivid impression of his new life and surroundings.  Painting a colourful picture of his new city and the people. Giving us an insight into an Englishman's impression  of the rich and diverse cultures of Brazil. 

    Malcolm sent us more of his observations and thoughts about his new adopted country.
    An Englishman in Brazil by Malcolm Clark Part 1
    An Englishman in Brazil by Malcolm Clark Part 2
    An Englishman in Brazil by Malcolm Clark Part 3
    An Englishman in Brazil by Malcolm Clark Part 3
    An Englishman in Brazil by Malcolm Clark Part 4
    Also
    Fear by Achmed Abdullah narrated by Malcolm Clarke Recorded
    and produced by Nigel Killick 
    THE fact that the man whom he feared had died ten years earlier did not in the least lessen Stuart McGregor’s obsession of horror, of a certain grim expectancy, every time he recalled that final scene, just before Farragut Hutchison disappeared in to the African jungle to his death. McGregor stood, spectrally motionless, waiting for the screams to come from the jungle. 
    http://peopletalk.libsyn.com/fear-by-achmed-abdullah
     
     
     

    • 32 min
    THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER

    THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER

     

    THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER 

    by Washington Irving (1783-1859) New England

    The morality play is a genre of Medieval and early Tudor theatrical entertainment.

    In their own time, these plays were known as interludes, a broader term given to dramas with or without a moral. Morality plays have a type of hidden meaning, in which the main human character is met by the devil in various disguises who tempts and entices the mortal and tricks him into selling his soul to the Devil in return for worldly goods and therefore choosing an evil life over a Godly path.

    THE DEVIL AND TOM WALKER follows in the long tradition of variety plays.

    This is a peopletalk audio production©2015.

    Narrated by Pipp Hamilton

    Recorded & Produced by Nigel Killick

    ------------------------------

    About Pipp Hamilton

    Pipe Hamilton started recording in 2013 with National Talking Newspapers and Magazines on a weekly basis with the material ranging from Saga to the Morning Star, later to become RNIB Newsagent. Then, in 2014, he went on a day's basic voiceover course with the intention of picking up some pointers to improve his listeners' experience.

    To his surprise, because he had not heard his own recorded voice in that way before, he was encouraged to return in March 2015 to record a narrative and a commercial reel.

    In the meantime, he had agreed to be one of the narrators in a local amateur dramatics production, set in the First World War. The piece he was given was Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen. On the last night, he was approached and asked to record the piece to be used in training potential officer material in the British Army.

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    You can buy the Music used in this production at:

    Kosta T: 5-Exaltations

    http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Kosta_T/5-Exaltations

    Kai Engel: The Scope

    http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Kai_Engel/The_Scope/

    Pipp Hamilton photo by Rebecca Byford

    • 38 min
    An audio interview with Cynthia Killick about her book “A Sound Revolution”.

    An audio interview with Cynthia Killick about her book “A Sound Revolution”.

     
     It’s a true story of intrigue, victory and betrayal, a story of industrial espionage  and corporate greed, counterfeiting and corporate wrongdoing. 
     
    It’s the story of an audio invention that revolutionised the world music business; a story that could have come straight out of the pages of a thriller novel.  It is not fiction, but a true story told by Marie Louise Killick's daughter Cynthia Killick.   
     
    In 1957, our mother Marie Louise Killick’s long legal fight was vindicated by the Royal Courts of Justice, in London, against Pye Radio. The court upheld her claims that Pye had infringed her patent rights covering a gramophone record stylus worth ten’s of millions of pounds. After her victory, Pye insured themselves for £2,500,000 with the Prudential Insurance Company to protect their retailers from possible claims for selling their counterfeit stylus around Britain.
     
    Pye had lost, but in 1959 Marie was manoeuvred into bankruptcy. She began a three year battle with the Official Receiver in an attempt to prevent him from taking over her damages claim against Pye Radio and settling for the derisory sum of £4,300, when she was owed millions. Marie never received a penny in damages. 
     
    Her stylus was a revolution in sound reproduction quality. The gemstone was ground to a flat at its tip and this rode on the sides of the record groove, dramatically reducing distortion, surface noise and wear and tear to the gramophone record. Decca declared ’Sapphox’ to be the best thing on the market and offered her £750,000 in 1945 for her British patent rights.
     
     
    In the late 1940s Pye Radio realised that the patent rights protecting her invention were not for sale. They then swamped the market with a counterfeit product, squeezing her business out of its growing profits.
     
    Marie would not give up the fight even when she was ’kidnapped’ off the street and locked away in a mental asylum. 
     
    Marie paid a heavy price for her passion to bring to music lovers superb sound reproduction, and the world benefited enormously from her invention. 
     
    Introduction narration by Nick Wyard  
    Book narration by Teresa Critchley
     
    Produced by Nigel Killick 
    You can buy Cynthia Killick’s book at this link: “A Sound Revolution”
    at lulu.com. 
     
    Or search for…. 
     
    “A Sound Revolution”
    in Lulu search box or the Book ISBN 9781291468304
     
     
    Music: Attribution-NonCommercial-No 3 United States
    Music from: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/MIT_Symphony_Orchestra/
    “La Traviata, Brindisi (Verdi)” (by MIT Symphony Orchestra)
    “Manon Lescaut, Intermezzo (Puccini)” (by MIT Symphony Orchestra)
    “Chopin: Three Mazurkas, Op. 59” (by Jonathan Biss)

    • 53 min
    Fear by Achmed Abdullah

    Fear by Achmed Abdullah

    Fear by Achmed Abdullah

    THE fact that the man whom he feared had died ten years earlier did not in the least lessen Stuart McGregor’s obsession of horror, of a certain grim expectancy, every time he recalled that final scene, just before Farragut Hutchison disappeared in to the African jungle to his death. McGregor stood, spectrally motionless, waiting for the screams to come from the jungle. 

     

    Fear by Achmed Abdullah

    Narrated by Malcolm Clark and Produced by Nigel Killick

    A peopletalk short audio story production© copyright 2015.  





     





     

    • 27 min
    A Will to Kill for by Emil Petaja

    A Will to Kill for by Emil Petaja

     

     

    A Will to Kill For by Emil Petaja. This short fictional story is in the long tradition of pulp fiction. It's a story of greed and murder but with a good twist at the end.

     

     

    Narrated by Tim Danko and produced by Nigel Killick with music by Benjamin Orth

     

     

    About Tim Danko.

     

    After a successful career in technology and management consulting, Tim has returned to the work he so loved in college – voiceover.  During college, this meant working in both commercial and public radio, now it means audiobooks and long-form narration.

     

    Tim focuses on contemporary mysteries, science fiction, faith and spirituality, and business.  Currently, he works mostly with independent authors and publishers.  He has studied with the highly respected coaches, directors, and voice actors Patrick Fraley, Scott Brick, and Paul Alan Ruben.  His voice has been described as warm and engendering trust.

     

    Tim lives in Pennsylvania in the United States with his wife, Sally.

     

     

    Here is a link to the music on ccmixter.org by Benjamin Orth, featuring Jacinda Espinosa.

     

    http://ccmixter.org/files/Benjamin_Orth/31696

    • 27 min
    The 1929 Great Depression, hard times and Bootlegging

    The 1929 Great Depression, hard times and Bootlegging

     
     
    Recorded by Kay Barbour on an iPod, edited & produced by Nigel Killick
     
    Here is an interview between Dorotha Miller 94 years old and her daughters 
    Kay Barbour about Dorotha early life and her Father who had to become was a Bootlegger and outlaw after the Great Depression of 1929. These were hard and dangerous times. It was also around the time of Bonnie and Clyde.
     
     
     
     
     
    Dorotha Miller was born in Huntington West Virginia in 1921 and will be 94 in May. Her family wasn't necessarily poor but what we call today as the "working poor". Sometimes her father had a job and sometimes he didn't. Bootlegging was what he did to make up the difference. It was easy money but it came with a risk and he spent some time in and out of jail as you will tell from her story.
     
    Then after the stock market crash in 1929, bootlegging became a way to make money to put food on the table. She tells a story about her aunt getting arrested for bootlegging during the depression after her husband died.  Her aunt ( her fathers sister) lived way up in the hills of West Virginia and had five kids to feed and no way to get a job. Not only did she not have any skills but even able bodied men could not get a job.
     
    There was no such thing as Social Security or Welfare or any other "safety net" for people in this situation. So she started bootlegging; selling whiskey out of her home out of desperation to provide for her children. She got busted by the police and went to jail for a year. She was afraid the authorities would try to take her children away and put them in orphanages so she asked my mother's mother(my grandmother) to go get the children and try to find homes for them till she got out of jail.
     
    Times were hard and lots of people did not have jobs so she knew that one family could not take all five children. So the children were split up among cousins, grandparents and aunts & uncles. One of the older girls stayed in my mother's home. And a year later when she got out of jail she got her children and went right back to bootlegging! What else was she going to do? But this time she was smarter and knew what to do to not get busted again!
     
    The point is that a lot of bootlegging and moonshining was done during the depression as a way to make money when people were out of jobs.
     
    Dorotha Miller also says that there was a famous Irish bootlegger, who's made his money this way.  Dorotha talks about this with great indignation in her voice! Her father spent time in jail and was looked down on for what he did but other people, well connected people made millions during the Depression time and are looked upon a respectable members in the American society today!  

    • 29 min

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