2 episodes

Polar Pod explores the big themes in polar research today. Created by the Oxford University Polar Forum.

Polar Pod Oxford University Polar Forum

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Polar Pod explores the big themes in polar research today. Created by the Oxford University Polar Forum.

    Carbon in the Ground 2: The Great Freezer of the North

    Carbon in the Ground 2: The Great Freezer of the North

    In this episode, we take a close look at permafrost and how it is responding to climate change. This matters because the permafrost is acting as a giant freezer for vast quantities of carbon-rich organic matter--if the freezer thaws, microbial decomposition can lead to this carbon ending up in the atmosphere, causing further warming. So, how resilient is permafrost to change? 
    We also discover how, as the ground thaws, it changes shape, and what this means for people's homes and infrastructure. We then learn about the importance of including local and Indigenous communities in the process of science conducted on their land. 
    Our brilliant guests on this episode were Professor Chris Burn and Dr Loeka Jongejans.
    Your Polar Pod team is Sam Cornish, Roberta Wilkinson and Jihad Zgheib.

    • 27 min
    Carbon in the Ground 1: A spaghetti bolognese of organic matter

    Carbon in the Ground 1: A spaghetti bolognese of organic matter

    Carbon-rich organic matter is just like spaghetti bolognese: a tangle of carbon chains that's vulnerable to being eaten. In order to keep your spag bol safe, special conditions are required (tupperware, fridge), and it's just the same for organic matter in the ground.

    Why does this matter? As the climate warms, so does the very ground beneath our feet. And where that ground is frozen (large parts of Canada, Alaska and Siberia) warming can lead to thawing, allowing carbon-rich soil to come out of the freezer and be attacked by hungry microbes. As microbes consume organic matter in the soil, they produce greenhouse gases, which have the potential to further warm the climate more, leading to a possible positive feedback effect. 

    In this episode, the first of a 5-part series on carbon in the ground, we explore how carbon gets into the ground in the first place, and what conditions enable it to stay there, locked away--or not, as the case may be. 

    Listen in for canine and culinary analogies as our guests serve up bitesized facts with lashings of context.

    Our wonderful guests on this episode were Professor Chris Burn, Dr Loeka Jongejans and Dr Jeppe Kristensen. We'll be hearing more from them in other episodes in this mini-series.

    Your Polar Pod team is Sam Cornish, Roberta Wilkinson and Jihad Zgheib.

    • 24 min

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