25 episodes

Science is experiencing a revolution. Preprints have accelerated the sharing of scientific findings and helped to make academia more equitable. Join our host, immunologist and open-science advocate Dr Jonny Coates, as he gets the “director's cut” from early career researchers, discussing their science, career journey and thoughts on academic life and much more. Preprints in Motion brings you the hottest science directly from the freshest experts. So, plug-in, sit back and join us as we dive into the fast-paced world of preprints.

Produced and Edited by Dr Emma Wilson & Dr John D Howard

Preprints in Motion Preprints in motion

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Science is experiencing a revolution. Preprints have accelerated the sharing of scientific findings and helped to make academia more equitable. Join our host, immunologist and open-science advocate Dr Jonny Coates, as he gets the “director's cut” from early career researchers, discussing their science, career journey and thoughts on academic life and much more. Preprints in Motion brings you the hottest science directly from the freshest experts. So, plug-in, sit back and join us as we dive into the fast-paced world of preprints.

Produced and Edited by Dr Emma Wilson & Dr John D Howard

    Episode 24: Baby hearts, inflammation and precarious postdocs

    Episode 24: Baby hearts, inflammation and precarious postdocs

    This week we discuss placental inflammation and heart development with postdoc Eleanor Jayne Ward and PI Suchita Nadkarni (@SciSuchita) from Queen Mary, University of London. In this preprint, the authors show that during embryonic heart development, neutrophils (innate immune cells) can sometimes cause placental inflammation. This inflammation leads to a loss of barrier function. In turn, this allows maternal monocytes (innate immune cells that develop into macrophages) to migrate into the embryonic heart. These monocytes alter the tissue resident embryonic macrophages and damage cardiac tissue. This cardiac damage continues postnatally. We discuss this and how limiting placental inflammation was enough to promote normal cardiac development. We also talk about the precarity of postdocs and why making research/postdoc a recognised profession would be an important step forward.

    Read the full preprint on bioRxiv https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.03.10.482611v1.full

    Visit the Nadkarni lab website https://www.qmul.ac.uk/whri/people/academic-staff/items/nadkarnisuchita.html

    Read more about the reasons scientists preprint https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/833400v1

    This episode was hosted by Jonny Coates, produced by Emma Wilson and edited by John D Howard.

    If you enjoyed this show then hit the subscribe button and leave a review (on Apple Podcasts or Spotify). If you love what we are trying to do then buy us a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/preprints! Any contribution is greatly appreciated.

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 49 min
    Episode 23: Tanycyting: Characterising a neural stem cell niche in the hypothalamus

    Episode 23: Tanycyting: Characterising a neural stem cell niche in the hypothalamus

    This week we discuss a population of stem cells called tanycytes which line hypothalamus in the brain with Alex Moore (@alexthemessiah) an Operational Research Analyst in the Civil Service & Kavitha Chinnaiya a Post Doc from the University of Sheffield (@sheffielduni).  Tanycytes are population of cells which line the 3rd ventricle in the hypothalamus, self renew and give rise to neurons and glia within the brain. We speak to them about the key findings of their paper which includes expanding on their roles as stem cells, as well as further characterising them with a variety of markers including NrCAM. To do this they evoked a range of techniques including the use of spheroids and single cell RNA sequencing and we chatted to them about those. We also find out about working in the Civil Service and all the skills that PhD offers that helped with this move from academia.

    Read the full preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.12.15.472761v1.full

    This episode was hosted by Jonny Coats, produced by Emma Wilson and edited by John D Howard .

    If you enjoyed this show then hit that subscribe button and leave a review (on Apple Podcasts or Spotify). If you love what we are trying to do then buy us a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/preprints! Any contribution is greatly appreciated.

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 55 min
    Episode 22: Caloric Restriction: The Difference Sex and Age Can Make

    Episode 22: Caloric Restriction: The Difference Sex and Age Can Make

    CW:// This week's episode touches on some themes revolving around caloric restriction which some listeners may find difficult.

    This week we speak to Ben Thomas @BenThomasSci, a final year PhD student at the University of Edinburgh @EdinburghUni about the benefits of caloric restriction, the impact in male and female mice as well as the effect of age. We highlight the ingrained sexisim within the biological sciences: often only male mice are used and we discuss how this can impact the results of various studies.

    In addition, we discuss the Edinburgh Open Research Initiative @edinburgh_open which promotes awareness and training of open research principles and lobby’s for these to become formalized within the University of Edinburgh. We also discuss how incentives in science have led to a potentially flawed system and how his experience as a teacher has helped him in academic science.

    Read the full preprint:
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.02.20.481222v1.full

    Other links:


    https://www.witworks.co.uk/
    https://edopenresearch.com/

    This episode was produced by Emma Wilson and edited by John D Howard .

    If you enjoyed this show then hit that subscribe button and leave a review (on Apple Podcasts or Spotify). If you love what we are trying to do then buy us a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/preprints! Any contribution is greatly appreciated.

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 57 min
    Episode 21: Science in motion: How journalists’ approach using preprints

    Episode 21: Science in motion: How journalists’ approach using preprints

    This week we discuss how journalists approach using preprints with Alice Fleerackers (@FleerackersA), a PhD student at the Simon Fraser University (@SFU). She tells us how she went behind the scenes and to examine the decision making process of journalists on whether to use preprints or not, how they contextualized the science, and what practices they use to evaluate preprints. We discuss the benefits of preprints and highlight the importance of science communication and our role as scientists to prevent the spread of misinformation.

    Read the full preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.02.03.479041v1.full

    This episode was produced by Emma Wilson and edited by Jonny Coates and John D Howard.

    If you enjoyed this show then hit that subscribe button and leave a review. If you love what we are trying to do then buy us a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/preprints!

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 53 min
    Episode 20: Mini Brains - Organoids as 3D Brain Models

    Episode 20: Mini Brains - Organoids as 3D Brain Models

    This week we discuss organoids and assembloids as models of neurodegenerative diseases with Sònia Sabaté Soler (@scisonias), a PhD student from the University of Luxembourg (@uni_lu). Find out about how 2D stem cells cultures are differentiated into complex 3D midbrain organoids which contain multiple cell types. We also discuss how microglia can be incorporated into the organoids to generate assembloids, mimicking the human brain more robustly. As always we speak about pre-printing and academic culture. We touch on some of the limitations on academia partially with reference to women in STEM and the potential of permanent post docs. .

    Read the full preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2022.01.21.477192v1.full

    This episode was produced by Emma Wilson and edited by John D Howard .

    If you enjoyed this show then hit that subscribe button and leave a review. If you love what we are trying to do then support us on buy me a coffee https://www.buymeacoffee.com/preprints. Any contribution is greatly appreciated.

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 46 min
    Episode 19: John Inglis & Richard Sever on the Creation of BioRxiv

    Episode 19: John Inglis & Richard Sever on the Creation of BioRxiv

    A really exciting special episode this week, as we talk to co-founders of BioRxiv (@biorxivpreprint) and MedRxiv (@medrxivpreprint) Richard Sever (@cshperspectives) & John Inglis (@JohnRInglis). We discuss how they met and started with BioRxiv along with the challenges they faced. We then chat about the considerations when accepting or rejecting preprints, or why certain papers are rejected from BioRxiv (they don’t just accept everything).  We also touch on the impact COVID 19 and the pandemic had on preprints as well as discuss the fraudulent papers and how they don’t tend to be pre-printed. If you’ve ever been concerned about preprints this is a great episode to learn more about how preprint servers work and what the future may hold for BioRxiv from the key people in the field.

    Other links

    BioRxiv - https://www.biorxiv.org/
    MedRxiv - https://www.medrxiv.org/
    Company Biologist - https://www.biologists.com/
    preLights - https://prelights.biologists.com/
    Cold Spring Harbour Lab Press - https://www.cshlpress.com/
    Vixra - https://vixra.org/

    This episode was produced by Jonny Coates and Emma Wilson and edited by John D Howard .

    If you enjoyed this show then hit that subscribe button and leave a review. If you love what we are trying to do then support us on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/preprintsinmotion where tiers start at as little as £1 a month!

    For the latest podcast news and updates follow us on Twitter @MotionPod or visit our website; www.preprintsinmotion.com.

    Produced by JEmJ Productions (find us on Twitter: Jonny @JACoates, Emma @ELWilson92, John @JohnDHoward8) and generously supported by ASAPbio (https://asapbio.org | @asapbio_).

    • 1 hr 12 min

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