85 episodes

Each week we talk to academic experts around the world to help unpack the context behind the headlines – and hear from scholars carrying out brand new research about how the world works. A podcast from The Conversation.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Conversation Weekly The Conversation

    • News
    • 4.8 • 32 Ratings

Each week we talk to academic experts around the world to help unpack the context behind the headlines – and hear from scholars carrying out brand new research about how the world works. A podcast from The Conversation.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Treating mental illness with electricity

    Treating mental illness with electricity

    Mental illnesses like obsessive compulsive disorder, depression and addiction are notoriously hard to treat and often don't respond to drugs. But a new wave of treatments that stimulate the brain with electricity are showing promise on patients and in clinical trials. We talk to three experts and one patient about the history of treating mental illness, how new technology and deeper understanding of the brain are leading to better treatments and where the neuroscience of mental illness is headed next. 
    Featuring Rachel A. Davis, a psychiatrist and researcher at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in the US and her patient Moksha Patel, a physician and professor at the University of Colorado who has severe obsessive compulsive disorder. We also hear from Joseph J. Fins, a neuroethicist and professor of medicine at Wei Cornell Medical College, part of Cornell University in the US and Jacinta O'Shea, a neuroscientist and associate professor at the University of Oxford.
    This episode was produced by Katie Flood, Dan Merino and Mend Mariwany. It was written by Katie Flood and Dan Merino. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Eloise Stevens does our sound design and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Full credits for this episode are available here. A transcript will be available soon. Sign up here for a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.
    Further reading:
    Deep brain stimulation can be life-altering for OCD sufferers when other treatment options fall shortPatients suffering with hard-to-treat depression may get relief from noninvasive magnetic brain stimulationBrain stimulation can rewire and heal damaged neural connections, but it isn’t clear how – research suggests personalization may be key to more effective therapies
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    • 38 min
    Uncharted Brain 3: the role viruses may play in Alzheimer’s

    Uncharted Brain 3: the role viruses may play in Alzheimer’s

    There are many competing theories about what causes Alzheimer's disease. For more than 30 years, Ruth Itzhaki has been accumulating evidence that viruses are involved in its development in the brain. We investigate in the In the third and final part of Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia.
    Featuring Ruth Itzhaki, professor emeritus of molecular neurobiology at the University of Manchester in the UK, Dana Cairns, a postdoctoral research fellow at Tufts University in the US and Davangere P. Devanand, director of geriatric psychiatry and professor of psychiatry and neurology, Columbia University Medical Center in the US.
    The series is hosted by Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware and was initially published via The Anthill podcast from the team at The Conversation in the UK.
    Uncharted Brain was produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. The Conversation Weekly theme music is by Neeta Sarl.
    Further reading:
    My work investigating the links between viruses and Alzheimer’s disease was dismissed for years – but now the evidence is buildingWe’ve been studying the same people for 76 years – this is what we’ve found out about Alzheimer’s diseaseAlzheimer’s disease: surprising new theory about what might cause it

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    • 27 min
    Uncharted Brain 2: the family trauma of dementia from sports injuries

    Uncharted Brain 2: the family trauma of dementia from sports injuries

    In the second of a three-part series, Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia, we explore chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a form of dementia that athletes from a whole range of sports can develop. We hear about the toll it can take on family members, who are often unaware of what’s happening to their loved ones.
    Featuring Matthew Smith, a senior lecturer in sport and exercise psychology at the University of Winchester in the UK and Lisa McHale, director of family relations at the Concussion Legacy Foundation.
    The series is hosted by Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware and was initially published via The Anthill podcast from the team at The Conversation in the UK.
    Uncharted Brain was produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. The Conversation Weekly theme music is by Neeta Sarl.
    Further reading:
    Sport-induced traumatic brain injury: families reveal the ‘hell’ of living with the conditionThe risk of concussion lurks at the Super Bowl – and in all other sportsTackling in children’s rugby must be banned to curb dementia risks
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    • 25 min
    Uncharted Brain 1: a lifelong study unlocks clues to Alzheimer’s

    Uncharted Brain 1: a lifelong study unlocks clues to Alzheimer’s

    This week we're running a three-part series called Uncharted Brain: Decoding Dementia exploring new research searching for answers to how dementia works in the brain and the damage it leaves behind. 
    The series is hosted by Paul Keaveny and Gemma Ware and was initially published via The Anthill podcast from the team at The Conversation in the UK.
    In the first episode, we explore how a study which began just after the end of the second world war is revealing new insights into the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Featuring Marcus Richards, professor of psychology in epidemiology and Jonathan Schott, professor of neurology, both at UCL in the UK and David Ward, one of the cohort study participants.
    Uncharted Brain was produced by Tiffany Cassidy with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. The Conversation Weekly theme music is by Neeta Sarl.
    Further reading:
    We’ve been studying the same people for 76 years – this is what we’ve found out about Alzheimer’s diseaseAlzheimer’s disease: surprising new theory about what might cause itNew Alzheimer’s drug slows cognitive decline – and may be available as early as next year


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    • 29 min
    Africa's stolen objects: what happens after they return

    Africa's stolen objects: what happens after they return

    Momentum is growing for objects stolen during the colonial era that are now held in museums in Europe and North America to be returned to the places and communities that they were taken from. We talk to three experts about what happens to these objects once they're returned and the questions their restitution is raising about the relationship between communities and museums in Africa. 
    Featuring John Kelechi Ugwuanyi, senior lecturer in archaeology and tourism at the University of Nigeria in Nsukka, Farai Chabata, visiting lecturer in heritage studies at the University of Zimbabwe and senior curator of ethnography for the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe and Aribiah David Attoe, lecturer in philosophy at the University of Witwatersrand.
    This episode was produced by Mend Mariwany and Katie Flood. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Eloise Stevens does our sound design and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Full credits for this episode are available here. A transcript will be available soon. Sign up here for a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.
    Further reading
    Germany is returning Nigeria’s looted Benin Bronzes: why it’s not nearly enough3D printing is helping museums in repatriation and decolonisation efforts‘Restitution’ of looted African art just continues colonial policies - much more is at stake
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    • 33 min
    How to depolarize deeply divided societies

    How to depolarize deeply divided societies

    From the US, to Brazil, to India, deepening political polarisation is used as a frame through which to see a lot of 21st century politics. But what can actually be done to depolarise deeply divided societies, particularly democracies? In this episode we speak to a political scientist and a philosopher trying to find answers to that question. 
    Featuring Jennifer Lynn McCoy, professor of political science at Georgia State University in the US and Robert B. Talisse, professor of philosophy at Vanderbilt University in the US.
    This episode was produced by Mend Mariwany and Katie Flood. The executive producer is Gemma Ware. Eloise Stevens does our sound design and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Full credits for this episode are available here. A transcript will be available soon. Sign up here for a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.
    Further reading and listening:
    Democratic and Republican voters both love civility – but the bipartisan appeal is partly because nobody can agree on what civility isExtreme political polarization weakens democracy – can the US avoid that fate?Brazil election: what I saw on the streets made me cautiously optimistic

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    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
32 Ratings

32 Ratings

MonstaDave ,

News, but not as you know it

This is a refreshingly different to relaying global affairs and research news. Top academics are interviewed each week by editors who bring depth and perspective. In a world of misinformation, this is vital listening. Subscribe!

Abby Beall ,

Amazing!

Such an informative and fascinating podcast. Absolutely love it!

Mm160324 ,

Accessible introduction

Accessible introduction to current academic discussions

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