618 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence The Economist

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    • 4.6 • 965 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Bench marks: weighing recent SCOTUS rulings

    Bench marks: weighing recent SCOTUS rulings

    The court’s term is not quite over, with contentious rulings still pending. We examine the latest decisions to gauge how its new conservative justices have affected its ideological bent. As a former Mauritanian president heads to jail we examine the country’s efforts to tackle corruption and bridge deep societal divides. And the long philosophical reach of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s only book.
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    • 22 min
    Hunger strikes: North Korea’s food shortages

    Hunger strikes: North Korea’s food shortages

    An admission that the country’s food situation is “tense” is a rare glimpse into the compounding effects of pandemic policies and crop failures. Adherents of wild conspiracy theories in America tend to be white, and often evangelical. But Hispanic Americans are getting conspiracy-curious too. And the moonshine that’s made from an Indian flower with a deep history.
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    • 19 min
    Drop it when it’s hot: the Fed’s consequential hint

    Drop it when it’s hot: the Fed’s consequential hint

    The merest mention of future interest-rate rises from America’s central bank sent markets into a tizzy. We consider the merits and the effects of signalling early and often. Europe’s drug use dipped when the pandemic began, but soon rebounded; we examine the rising potency of the continent’s drugs and drug syndicates. And data reveal what makes work-from-home productivity so low.
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    • 22 min
    A vote with no confidence: Ethiopia’s untimely election

    A vote with no confidence: Ethiopia’s untimely election

    The northern region of Tigray, consumed by war and facing famine, will not vote today. It is all a far cry from what Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed once promised. Italy has piles of cash and a new ministry to guide it through a green revolution; we examine its plans and its challenges. And a rare conservation success off Australia’s coast.
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    • 21 min
    Press to exit: Hong Kong’s media arrests

    Press to exit: Hong Kong’s media arrests

    The raid of an outspoken pro-democracy newspaper, carried out under the city’s newish security law, has further spooked its media outlets. We ask what remains of press freedom. Our correspondent visits Europe’s and Africa’s largest slums to see how a grinding pandemic has affected their residents. And how Somaliland’s curious, silent camel-trading method is changing.
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    • 22 min
    A hardline act to follow: Iran’s presidential election

    A hardline act to follow: Iran’s presidential election

    The supreme leader is consolidating theocratic power and ensuring a hardline legacy. Voters know they have little meaningful choice; many will simply stay home. A trial shows the life-saving power of an antibody therapy for the most severe covid-19 cases—suggesting that seemingly failed earlier drugs need revisiting. And why a faded folk-music tradition in Norway is experiencing a revival. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
965 Ratings

965 Ratings

Yannis04 ,

Quality, consistent

The economists’ podcasts in general are good quality, informative. Besides Jason Palmer has one of the most enchanting voices.

Rob Mansfield ,

Keep to the left

If you’re looking for a left leaning only version of every topic, then this is the podcast for you

just love podcasts ,

Consistently insightful

Always topical , consistently insightful and with a delightfully naive presentation which makes it refreshingly different from other more heavyweight news analyses ...

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