300 episodes

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

The Intelligence The Economist

    • Daily News
    • 4.6, 731 Ratings

Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

    Attention deficit: China’s campaign against Uighurs

    Attention deficit: China’s campaign against Uighurs

    Unparalleled surveillance, forced labour, even allegations of ethnic cleansing: atrocities in Xinjiang province carry on. Why are governments and businesses so loth to protest? The field of economics is, at last, facing up to its long-standing race problem. And how covid-19 is scrambling Scandinavians’ stereotypes about one another.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 23 min
    Into left field? America's chief justice

    Into left field? America's chief justice

    Recent Supreme Court rulings might seem like a leftward shift. But Chief Justice John Roberts is leaving loopholes for future conservative challenges. China’s video-sharing social network TikTok was wildly popular in India, until the government pulled the plug this week. And why high-end Bordeaux wines are so (relatively) cheap.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 23 min
    Unsettled question: Israel’s annexation threat

    Unsettled question: Israel’s annexation threat

    A once-fringe position on annexing the West Bank is now a real prospect. But both international support and opposition are lukewarm; not even Israelis think it a priority. For years, war-crimes allegations hung over Kosovo’s president. Now a court has weighed in—undercutting long-running territorial talks with Serbia. And why flashy homes in Sierra Leone’s capital are taxed the same as tin-roofed shacks.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    Two systems go: a new law grips Hong Kong

    Two systems go: a new law grips Hong Kong

    A sweeping new national-security law deeply undermines Beijing’s “one country, two systems” approach in the territory; under it, arrests have already been made. What next for Hong Kong’s activists and its businesses? Malawi’s overturned election is a ray of hope that democracy can survive both incumbents’ strongman tactics and covid-19. And the varied successes of pro- and anti-Trump tell-all books. 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 22 min
    The next threat: confronting global risks

    The next threat: confronting global risks

    Six months on from the first reports of the coronavirus, this special episode examines the catastrophic and even existential risks to civilisation. Work is already under way to head off future pandemics, but how to prepare—and who can take on preparing—for the gravest threats with the longest odds?
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 25 min
    States of alarm: America’s covid-19 surge

    States of alarm: America’s covid-19 surge

    An entirely predictable pattern is playing out: the states quickest to exit lockdowns are being hit hardest. Can the country get the virus reliably under control? The pandemic has led to staggering amounts of excess plastic waste, now washing up on shores near you. And the growing risks to South Korea’s tradition of bullfighting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
731 Ratings

731 Ratings

James99999 ,

Brilliant

I’m not interested in every storey but out of three subjects, there’s something everyday which I didn’t know or knew very little about and is great to get clued up on.

W-shaped Econ 101 ,

Great content for a reasonable price.

Yes, the ads are annoying (and if you haven’t figured how to skip it, you’re an IT dunce), however, for the quality of content, this is a good deal!
It’s miles better than other free news outlet there. Bloomberg is expensive and rubbish

dog FM ,

Interesting, informative & intelligent

There’s so much news and hysteria around it together with false news that it’s great to find a source that provides insight into two or three things a day

Top Podcasts In Daily News

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The Economist