22 episodes

I am lucky. As part of the TRIUM Global EMBA team, I get to interact with some of the most interesting and informed people on the planet. This is never more true than in the conversations I have at the margins of the official program – exchanges with people who enrich, educate and entertain. TRIUM Connects seeks to reproduce those moments in a series of recorded conversations on topics from the worlds of business, economics, leadership and political economy. I hope the podcast gives people a ‘taste’ of what make the TRIUM experience so special and lets me share a little of my luck! – Matt Mulford
— Disclaimer: The views expressed in this podcast are solely those of the host and his guests and do not necessarily represent those of the TRIUM Global EMBA program or its three alliance schools (NYU Stern, the LSE, or HEC Paris). The content herein is intended solely for the entertainment of the listener and the host and should not be relied upon in making any decisions.

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TRIUM Connects TRIUM Global EMBA

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 16 Ratings

I am lucky. As part of the TRIUM Global EMBA team, I get to interact with some of the most interesting and informed people on the planet. This is never more true than in the conversations I have at the margins of the official program – exchanges with people who enrich, educate and entertain. TRIUM Connects seeks to reproduce those moments in a series of recorded conversations on topics from the worlds of business, economics, leadership and political economy. I hope the podcast gives people a ‘taste’ of what make the TRIUM experience so special and lets me share a little of my luck! – Matt Mulford
— Disclaimer: The views expressed in this podcast are solely those of the host and his guests and do not necessarily represent those of the TRIUM Global EMBA program or its three alliance schools (NYU Stern, the LSE, or HEC Paris). The content herein is intended solely for the entertainment of the listener and the host and should not be relied upon in making any decisions.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    E22 - It’s All About the People

    E22 - It’s All About the People

    What does being a fabulously successful, early stage VC investor have in common with being a world class CEO? The answer, according to Jihoon Rim, my guest for this episode, is the ability to select the right people and then, largely get out of their way and let them do their jobs.
    Jihoon, after a stint at Softbank, founded his own VC firm – Kcube Ventures – in 2012 with an initial fund of USD 10M. In 2021, when the fund was liquidated, it returned more than USD 1B. In 2015, Jihoon was appointed the CEO of Kakao. In the 2.5 years of his leadership, Kakao’s revenues and operating profits more than doubled (from USD 932M to USD 1.972B and USD 88M to USD 165M, respectively). Such successes led to Jihoon being recognised in 2017 Korea’s number 1 CEO (by Insight Korea), and in 2018 as one of Korea’s Top Ten Heros (by Maeil Broadcasting Network).
    He joined NYU’s Stern School of Business as an Adjunct Professor in 2019 where he teaches some of the most highly regarded elective courses in the entire School.  Between 2018 and 2022, he completed his Doctorate degree. This was all completed before he turned 43 years old.
    In this episode we discuss what Jihoon looked for when investing in founders and how he took the lessons from that world and applied them in his role as CEO of Kakao. We also discuss how people routinely misunderstand the nature and scope of tech companies’ powers – which he believes is too great, and how transparency will play a crucial role if we ever want to do something about this problem. Finally, we explore why Korean content has been so successful on the international entertainment stage.
    Jihoon is smart, articulate, highly accomplished and wonderfully humble. His candour and honesty in our discussion was refreshing. He is proof that wisdom does not need to rely on age. This episode is, in my mind, an exemplar of how a good leader sees the world and their role in it. Enjoy the conversation!
    Citations
    Frans Johansson (2014) The Click Moment: Seizing Opportunity in an Unpredictable World. Penguin

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    • 1 hr 8 min
    E21 - Adding a 'P' to ESG

    E21 - Adding a 'P' to ESG

    Over the last 10-20 years we have seen the rise and rise of populist and nationalist movements in democracies across the world. This, in part, reflects a growing dissatisfaction with the state of our democratic institutions. Many people just don’t believe that democracy delivers for them.
    My guest for this episode is Professor Alberto Alemanno. To combat the ever-increasing attraction of illiberal political movements, Alberto believes we need to work towards creating a more even playing field between companies and citizens in our civil society. If we could do that, so the argument goes, we would have a healthier polity and more effective democratic institutions.
    A specific step toward these goals would be to expect private firms to make public all of their political activity – adding a ‘P’ for politics – to their existing ESG reporting requirements. As part of this, firms would need to report their support and membership of trade associations and the policies those associations work for and against. Like holding firms responsible for the ESG of companies in their supply chains, this type of political reporting would hold firms responsible for the interventions in the political system made on their behalf by others. Alberto argues that this would stop companies from playing a double game of supporting one policy publicly while simultaneously working to stop that policy through their support of other organisations and associations. The idea is a fascinating one, and Albertos knowledge and passion of the issues it raises shine through in our conversation.
    Alberto is the Jean Monnet Professor of European Union Law & Policy at HEC Paris. He is also the founder of the civic startup, The Good Lobby, whose mission is to equalize access to power by strengthening the advocacy capacity of civil society and making corporate political influence more accountable and sustainable. He sits on the board of several civil society organizations, such as Friends of Europe, European Alternatives, VoxEurop, Access Info Europe, as well as the citizens’ campaigning movement We Move, which operates transnationally.
    I hope you enjoy the episode!
    Citations
    Alemanno, A. (2017) Lobbying for Change: Find Your Voice to Create a Better Society. Icon Books.Heimans, J. & Timms, H. (2019) New Power: Why Outsiders are Winning, Institutions are Failing, and How the Rest of Us Can Keep Up in the Age of Mass Participation. Picador.The Good Lobby (www.thegoodlobby.eu)Mancur Olson (1974) The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. Harvard University Press (revised edition).
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    E20 - War in Ukraine: The Limits and Strengths of an Interdependent World

    E20 - War in Ukraine: The Limits and Strengths of an Interdependent World

    I am joined in this episode by Professor Mick Cox of the LSE to discuss the unfolding tragic war in Ukraine. How do we possibly make sense of what is happening? What kind of end can we imagine when losing is not an option for anyone? What does winning or losing even mean in this situation? Is this the end the age of international order, growing prosperity, and relative peace created by a rules-based international system? If so, what will take its place? Will China play the role of the peacemaker in the interests of maintaining global stability, or will its alliance with Russia start a new age of ‘big power’ spheres of influence and a cold war…or even a ‘hot’ war? Mick and I address these questions and more. Our thoughts and sympathies go out to all who are suffering in this epic tragedy.  
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    • 1 hr 5 min
    E19 - Social Media and Social Pathology: Why and How to Hold Platforms Responsible for Harm

    E19 - Social Media and Social Pathology: Why and How to Hold Platforms Responsible for Harm

    I am joined in this episode by Professor Vasant Dhar where we talk about why social media platforms should be regulated and how we would go about doing so. Vasant argues that we have failed to install any rules of the game when it comes to holding platforms responsible for their demonstratable contribution to social ills. This, according to Vasant, leads to some truly egregious gaps in our ability to avoid negative outcomes and hold those responsible liable for their actions. For example, in our current settings, a social platform could be shown to be responsible for tens of thousands cases of depression, leading to hundreds of suicides but still to have not violated any rule or law and be completely free of liability. Vasant brings more than 30 years of study and research in this area to the table.
    Vasant is a professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business and the Center for Data Science. He is the former Editor-in-Chief of the journal Big Data and the founder of SCT Capital, one of the first machine-learning-based hedge funds in New York City in the 90s. His research focuses on building scalable decision making systems from large sources of data using techniques and principles from the disciplines of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning.
    Citations
    Bail, Chris (2021) Breaking the Social Media Prism: How to Make Our Platforms Less Polarizing. Princeton University Press.Dhar, Vasant – Brave New World Podcast. See bravenewpodcast.com.Haidt, Jonathan (2021) ‘The dangerous experiment on teen girls,’ The Atlantic, November 21.Kramer, D., Guillory, J.E., and Hancock, J.T. (2014) ‘Emotional contagion through social networks,’ Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: 111(24), pp. 8788-8790.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    E18 - Stewards of the Future: Can and Should we Count on Boards to do the Right Thing?

    E18 - Stewards of the Future: Can and Should we Count on Boards to do the Right Thing?

    Increasingly, company boards are expected to incorporate environmental, social and governance issues into their strategic choices and performance criteria. How, exactly, should they do this? One approach is to integrate the entire costs/benefits of the firm’s activities, including those which are currently unpaid-for externalities, into its balance sheet. But is that really possible? Or, even desirable?
    In this episode I discuss this issue – and others! – with my guest, Helle Bank Jorgensen. Helle is an internationally recognized expert on sustainable business practices, with a 30-year record of turning environmental, social, and governance (ESG) risks into innovative and profitable business opportunities. She is the founder and chief executive of Competent Boards, which offers online climate and ESG programs that draw on the experience of over 150 renowned board members, executives, and investors.
    Helle is also the author of the newly published book, Stewards of The Future: A Guide for Competent Boards. This book shows boards must have the insight and foresight to ask the right questions of management on complex issues such as climate change, ESG, corruption, cybersecurity, human trafficking and supply-chain resilience to realize long-term profits and sustainability.
    Citations

    Jorgensen, Helle Bank (2022) Stewards of The Future: A Guide for Competent Boards. Barlow Publishing.Cornell, Bradford and Damodaran, Aswath (2020), Valuing ESG: Doing Good or Sounding Good? (March 20, 2020). NYU Stern School of Business, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3557432 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3557432
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    • 1 hr 13 min
    E17 - Supply Chain Management in Transition: What has COVID taught us about the weaknesses of how we manage supply chains?

    E17 - Supply Chain Management in Transition: What has COVID taught us about the weaknesses of how we manage supply chains?

    How should we view the current crisis in our supply chains? Did the external shock of COVID create severe, but relatively temporary problems? If so, then we should, slowly but surely, see a return to how things were before, with ‘just in time’ principles driving supply chain design and execution. Or, has the crisis revealed fundamental structural weaknesses in our pre-COVID practices? If so, we should expect significant changes in supply chain designs in a post-COVID world. Which do you predict?
    Professor Michel Fender of HEC Paris, one of the world’s experts on supply chain management, joins me in this episode to talk about this question and a number of other related issues. The general theme of the discussion is on how supply chain management, once seen through a logistics lens as merely a support function, has evolved into one of the most important strategic factors determining success in competition and, ultimately, value creation for all stakeholders. 
    I hope you enjoy the conversation!
    Citations
    Fender, M. (2020) Next Generation Supply Chains: The Guide for Business Leaders. London: Choir Press.Read, L. (1958), ‘I Pencil: My Family Tree as Told to Leornard E. Read,’ The Freeman. 
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    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

StudentPLRM ,

Excellent

Well presented, informative thank you.

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