16 episodes

The What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast brings you the latest on evidence-based practice to improve outcomes for children, young people and families. In each episode we’ll be discussing different interventions, what the evidence says about their effectiveness, and what this means for people working with and for children and young people who have a social worker.
We’ll be hearing from academics, senior leaders, social workers and experts by experience.

WWCSC Talks What Works For Children's Social Care

    • Non-Profit
    • 4.2 • 5 Ratings

The What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast brings you the latest on evidence-based practice to improve outcomes for children, young people and families. In each episode we’ll be discussing different interventions, what the evidence says about their effectiveness, and what this means for people working with and for children and young people who have a social worker.
We’ll be hearing from academics, senior leaders, social workers and experts by experience.

    Inclusion and Care in Schools During Covid with Rachael Pryor -Bristol City Council

    Inclusion and Care in Schools During Covid with Rachael Pryor -Bristol City Council

    Thank you for listening to the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast - COVID-19 special. In this episode we are delighted to be joined by Rachael Pryor, Head of Service, Inclusive City and Virtual School Headteacher at Bristol City Council.

    In this episode, Rachael discusses how lockdown helped herself and her team think differently about how they organise their time more effectively, in particular with children who are being educated outside of the local authority. Rachael also considers the complexities of assessing when it is right for children, families and carers to take up the opportunity to return to school.

    Listen to the episode to hear more about how Rachael and the HOPE School team are working to encourage positive cultures in schools, so they are inclusive and understanding of attachment and trauma.

    Follow the HOPE School on Twitter

    @HOPE4CiC

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 18 min
    Communication, cooperation, calmness and coffee breaks

    Communication, cooperation, calmness and coffee breaks

    Thank you for listening to the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast - COVID-19 special. In this episode we are delighted to be joined by three of the senior leaders from Telford and Wrekin Council - Clive Jones, the out-going Executive Director, Children’s and Family Services; Jo Britton, who is is taking over the role and has been Director of Children’s Safeguarding and Family Support at the Council; and Heather Loveridge, Director of Education and Skills.

    In this episode, Clive, Jo and Heather discuss the difficulties involved in working together when we’re physically apart, the importance of regular communication - with the community, workforce, and children and families - and bringing data about vulnerable learners together.

    They also discuss how it was vital that, having assessed the needs of each family, they then discussed this with the families to ensure they were happy with the outcome and were getting the support they needed.

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 33 min
    Relationships and partnerships - Jenny Turnross discusses how Birmingham are responding to COVID-19

    Relationships and partnerships - Jenny Turnross discusses how Birmingham are responding to COVID-19

    Thank you for listening to the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast - COVID-19 special.

    In this episode, Michael Sanders, Chief Executive of What Works for Children’s Social Care, talks to Jenny Turnross, Director Of Practice at Birmingham Children’s Trust.

    In her conversation with Michael, Jenny discusses how forming a partnership operation group with all departments working with children and families allowed Birmingham Children’s Trust to cut through bureaucracy and achieve a commitment that all partners would continue to offer the same level of service to children and families.

    Jenny shares how the Trust is planning on turning the resource hub which offered food parcels and supermarket vouchers to support children, families and care-leavers who were struggling during COVID-19 into a long term resource for the community.

    Jenny discusses the balance of providing a mix of virtual and in-person support that responds to both the constraints of containing future infection spikes, and the needs of the people of Birmingham.

    Keep up to date with what’s happening in Birmingham on Twitter - @Bhamchildtrust

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 35 min
    Julia Hassall, Rochdale - resilience and Skype discos during lockdown

    Julia Hassall, Rochdale - resilience and Skype discos during lockdown

    Thank you for listening to the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast - COVID-19 special.

    In this episode, Michael Sanders, Chief Executive of What Works for Children’s Social Care, talks to Julia Hassall, the Assistant Director for Children’s Social Care in Rochdale.

    Julia discusses how Rochdale’s relational approach to practice guided their response to COVID-19, how they embraced creative solutions - such as recordings of lullabies, direct work through windows, Easter egg deliveries to see difficult to reach families, and weekly Skype discos.

    Julia also talks about the importance of ensuring practitioners feel cared for by the organisation they work for, so they in turn can continue to care for the families and children they are working with in a creative and supportive way, and how Rochdale have helped colleagues maintain resilience through coaching sessions.

    Keep up to date with what’s happening in Rochdale on Twitter - @RochdaleCouncil

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 28 min
    Social work during COVID-19 with Richard Devine, a social worker in BANES

    Social work during COVID-19 with Richard Devine, a social worker in BANES

    Thank you for listening to the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast - COVID-19 special.

    In this episode, Michael Sanders, Chief Executive of What Works for Children’s Social Care, talks to Richard Devine, a Social Worker for Bath and North East Somerset (@RichardDevineSW).

    Richard discusses the impact of remote working, the cumulative effect of ‘mildly difficult’ situations and missing the moments of reflection and decompression while driving between appointments. Richard and Michael also explore how new working arrangements, such as switching to phone conversations, have changed relationship dynamics between families and social workers.

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 21 min
    Special Edition - in conversation with Dr Peter Sidebotham about the new Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel report

    Special Edition - in conversation with Dr Peter Sidebotham about the new Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel report

    In this special episode of the What Works for Children’s Social Care podcast, Michael Sanders, Chief Executive of What Works for Children’s Social Care,  is talking with Dr Peter Sidebotham, who led the Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel review of sudden unexpected death in infancy in families where children are considered at risk of significant harm, which was published this week.

    Despite the huge reduction in the incidence over the last 20-30 years, sudden unexpected death in infancy is still the biggest cause of death for infants, outside the neonatal period, with a high proportion of incidents occurring in families with identified vulnerabilities - such as over-crowding, parental drug and alcohol misuse and mental health issues.

    Michael and Peter discuss the findings of the report, next steps and the  importance of good, relationship-based social work in reducing the risk of sudden unexpected death in infants.

    Find out more about the Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/child-safeguarding-practice-review-panel

    Read the report:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safeguarding-children-at-risk-from-sudden-unexpected-infant-death

    Follow the Children Safeguarding Practice Review Panel on Twitter

    @CSPR_Panel

    If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for upcoming topics, please get in touch by emailing info@whatworks-csc.org.uk

    You can also follow us on Twitter @whatworksCSC

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

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