168 episodes

You Must Remember This is a storytelling podcast exploring the secret and/or forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. It’s the brainchild and passion project of Karina Longworth (founder of Cinematical.com, former film critic for LA Weekly), who writes, narrates, records and edits each episode. It is a heavily-researched work of creative nonfiction: navigating through conflicting reports, mythology, and institutionalized spin, Karina tries to sort out what really happened behind the films, stars and scandals of the 20th century.

You Must Remember This Stitcher

    • TV & Film
    • 4.8, 1.1K Ratings

You Must Remember This is a storytelling podcast exploring the secret and/or forgotten histories of Hollywood’s first century. It’s the brainchild and passion project of Karina Longworth (founder of Cinematical.com, former film critic for LA Weekly), who writes, narrates, records and edits each episode. It is a heavily-researched work of creative nonfiction: navigating through conflicting reports, mythology, and institutionalized spin, Karina tries to sort out what really happened behind the films, stars and scandals of the 20th century.

    “It wasn’t sexism, then” (Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman, Episode 1)

    “It wasn’t sexism, then” (Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman, Episode 1)

    We’ll begin with a look at how Polly Platt’s legacy was appraised when she died in 2011. Then we’ll go back in time to tell Polly’s story from the start, beginning with her Revolutionary Road-esque childhood in Europe and America as the neglected daughter of two alcoholics; to her years studying scenic design in environments in which women weren’t welcome; the secret pregnancy that halted her formal education, and the early marriage that took her West and cemented her desire to tell stories through design. Throughout, we’ll talk about how Platt’s experiences, as the product of an American military family of the 1950s—and the daughter of a mother who had been forced to abandon a career for motherhood––shaped her view of gender roles and relations, and her idea of what it meant to be the wife of a important man.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Sneak Peek: Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman, Episode 1

    Sneak Peek: Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman, Episode 1

    Excited for the new season? We can hardly wait to share the untold story of Polly Platt, the secret weapon behind some of the most highly acclaimed films of the 1970s, '80s and '90s. This audio journey will feature interviews and intimate details about her trailblazing legacy and heartbreaking private life, including excerpts from her own unpublished memoirs dealing with her creative collaborations and relationship with her second husband, Oscar-nominated filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich. The new season premieres May 26. For now, please enjoy a taste of what's to come in this extended preview of episode 1. Actress Maggie Siff is featured as the voice of Polly Platt.

    • 22 min
    Season Trailer: Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman

    Season Trailer: Polly Platt, The Invisible Woman

    Polly Platt -- producer, writer and Oscar-nominated production designer -- lived an epic Hollywood life. And yet, if you know Platt’s name today, it’s probably because in 1970 her husband and creative collaborator Peter Bogdanovich had an affair with Cybill Shepherd while shooting the film that launched their careers, The Last Picture Show. But Platt was much more than a jilted wife: she was the secret, often invisible-to-the-public weapon behind some of the best films of the 1970s, '80s and '90s. Drawing on Platt’s unpublished memoir, as well as ample interviews and archival research, The Invisible Woman will tell Polly Platt’s incredible story from her perspective, for the first time. New episodes will begin releasing May 26.

    • 1 min
    159: Vanessa Williams, Whitney Houston and Hollywood’s Misogynoir Problem (Make Me Over, Episode 8)

    159: Vanessa Williams, Whitney Houston and Hollywood’s Misogynoir Problem (Make Me Over, Episode 8)

    In 1983, Vanessa Williams became the first black woman to win Miss America. In 1984, a few weeks from the end of her reign, she was forced to step down when she found out Penthouse was going to publish unauthorized nude images of her in their magazine. Williams went on to have a successful singing career and star in movies, but her career trajectory tells more than the story of a black beauty icon who overcame obstacles to make it in Hollywood. It's a story that echoes the legacies of racism, colorism, tokenism and misogynoir (the misogyny experienced specifically by black women) in 20th century Hollywood and how, as a result, black women — from Williams to Whitney Houston — have had to display exceptional talent to make the case that their images are worth circulating and celebrating as beautiful.


    This episode was written and performed by Cassie da Costa, an entertainment writer for The Daily Beast. She lives in Ojai, California.

    • 37 min
    158: The Hemingway Curse? Mariel and Margaux (Make Me Over, Episode 7)

    158: The Hemingway Curse? Mariel and Margaux (Make Me Over, Episode 7)

    A close look at the parallel lives of Margaux and Mariel Hemingway, sisters born with a world-famous last name that stood for both genius and self-destruction. Both rose to fame in the 1970s, Margaux as a supermodel and Mariel as an actress, and then both struggled with various demons. But while Margaux followed her grandfather's fate, Mariel confronted the family's dark legacy and reinvented herself as a mental health and wellness advocate.

     

    This episode was written and performed by Michael Schulman, a writer at The New Yorker and the author of "Her Again: Becoming Meryl Streep," a New York Times bestseller. His work has also appeared in Vanity Fair, the New York Times and other publications.

    • 44 min
    157: Cass Elliot, Carnie Wilson and Fat-Shaming in Rock and Pop (Make Me Over, Episode 6)

    157: Cass Elliot, Carnie Wilson and Fat-Shaming in Rock and Pop (Make Me Over, Episode 6)

    Cass Elliot didn’t die eating a ham sandwich. But the lasting power of that urban legend speaks to a far darker story. Elliot possessed one of the most influential voices of the 1960s. However, while her big break with The Mamas and The Papas and meteoric career changed the LA music scene forever, it also entrapped Elliot in a cycle of fat-shaming, sending her spiraling into catastrophic weight-loss regimens. In this episode, we’ll talk about the music industry’s complicated relationship with weight, how crash dieting likely led to the untimely death of this music legend, and the true legacy of Elliot in pop culture.


    This episode was written and performed by Lexi Pandell, a writer from Oakland, California. Her work has been published by The Atlantic, the New York Times, WIRED, The New Republic, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, Playboy and many others.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

Jonah8208 ,

Fascinating

I am a guy that detests the cult of Celebrity and its useless denizens that the plague the world media these days. But this Podcast, about the stories behind the real stars of Cinema is amazing, I was unaware I knew so little. Proper movie stars have always been a bit mysterious, that was always part of the appeal, with the veneer ripped away it turns out they were / are all actually human (sort of) with more flaws and less ability to deal with them than most of us. I have always known that when a great talent is bestowed with one hand an equally great handicap is bestowed with the other. This is real history disguised as a celebrity podcast, it is far more entertaining, informative and important in cultural history than you would imagine. Give it a go for eg you will be amazed at how much you don’t know about one of the all time superstars Marylin Monroe just for starters.

peanut.gallery ,

Content superb, delivery challenging

I am absolutely addicted to this podcast for the fascinating topics and excellent research – I can just about tune out the strained, slow diction and vocal fry (honestly, it's so engaging you can generally listen past them) but what bothers me is the occasional misuse of a word (hollowed to mean hallowed) or pronouncing a name 2 or 3 ways over one episode. And mispronunciation of a word the way one does when you've read it but never heard it. Would be magic if the someone on the team could spot these before publishing and do a few tiny retakes so this smart, well written 'cast is as slick and polished as it truly deserves to be!

Bug Humbah ,

One of my favourite podcasts

Fascinating and well researched. Other reviewers are right about the narrator having an odd pace to her voice and over enunciating some words, but you adjust and stop noticing if you just give it a shot.

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