160 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Visual Arts

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

    What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

    This week: as Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are sworn in as the president and vice president of the United States, what might their administration do for the visual arts? We talk to Jori Finkel, a regular contributor to The Art Newspaper and The New York Times from Los Angeles. We explore an extraordinary story linking QAnon, the far-right conspiracy theory and hate group, and how its origins may lie in the activities of a collective of radical Italian artists in the 1990s, the Luther Blisset Project, with Eddy Frankel, the Culture editor of Time Out and founder of the art and football magazine OOF. And in this week’s Work of the Week, we actually look at 20 works: Alphonse Mucha’s Slav Epic, with Mucha’s grandson, John.


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    • 51 min
    The white supremacist art in the US Capitol

    The white supremacist art in the US Capitol

    This week, we look at white supremacist art in the Capitol in Washington and discuss the legacy of Hannah Arendt. Plus, we look at a record-breaking auction sale of a Batman comic. 
    Sarah Beetham, chair of liberal arts and assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, discusses the statue of the Confederate General Robert E. Lee that was removed from the Capitol building two weeks before right-wing mobs, incited by President Donald Trump and other Republican lawmakers, attacked the Capitol and filled it with white supremacist imagery like the Confederate flag. A further eight Confederate statues remain in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall today.
    With the riots in Washington as a backdrop, we talk to two artists, Peter Kennard and Vivienne Koorland, who feature in an exhibition programme dedicated to Hannah Arendt at Richard Saltoun in London this year. They discuss the the political theorist's legacy and her affect on their work.
    And as a copy of the first ever comic featuring Batman sells for $2.2m at auction, we ask Ed Jaster, the Senior Vice President at Heritage Auctions, what makes this item so special.


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    • 1 hr 2 min
    2020: The year in review

    2020: The year in review

    It’s the final episode of 2020 and so, as we always do as the year comes to an end, we’re reviewing the last 12 months in the art world. And what a year it’s been. Host Ben Luke was joined by three of The Art Newspaper’s correspondents on the frontline reporting the huge events of the year and their effects on the art world. Anna Brady is our art market editor, Louisa Buck is our contemporary art correspondent, and Gareth Harris is our chief contributing editor. Inevitably, as we tackled the year’s events, two major global events dominated the discussions: the coronavirus pandemic and the death of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter and the fight for racial justice.
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    • 1 hr 16 min
    Brexit: how will it change the art market?

    Brexit: how will it change the art market?

    The Brexit deadline is imminent and the UK and the European Union are desperately seeking an agreement. But what are the implications either way for the art trade? We asked the writer and art market specialist Ivan Macquisten and former Conservative MEP and current chief executive of the British Chamber of Commerce in Brussels, Daniel Dalton. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the curator Neville Wakefield tells us about the planks made by John McCracken, who’s suddenly gained a new audience because he was initially rumoured to be the artist behind that shiny monolith in the Utah desert.


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    • 54 min
    Contemporary public art: who is it for?

    Contemporary public art: who is it for?

    This week, we look at contemporary public art, as debate has raged about various works in recent weeks. Who is public art for and why does it continue to provoke such strong reactions? Host Ben Luke talks to Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and James Lingwood from the visionary producers of public works, Artangel, about art by Christoph Büchel, Jeremy Deller, Maggi Hambling, Rachel Whiteread, Marc Quinn and Mark Wallinger; the artist Olaf Breuning tells us about a public work he has made for a hospital in Miami; and for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Tom Sachs talks about Mondrian's Broadway Boogie-Woogie in the Museum of Modern Art, New York.


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    • 57 min
    Is the future of museums in Africa?

    Is the future of museums in Africa?

    This week we look at museums and Africa: we explore the future of museums and African institutions’ central role in it and we look at the 19th-century looting of the Benin Bronzes and what it tells us about museums and colonialism, then and now. We talk to Sonia Lawson, the founding director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo, and András Szántó, the writer of the new book The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues. We also speak to Dan Hicks, professor of contemporary archaeology at the University of Oxford and curator at the Pitt Rivers Museum there, about his book The Brutish Museums, focusing on the Benin Bronzes. And for our Work of the Week, Christopher Riopelle of the National Gallery in London talks about a painting of Copernicus by the Polish artist Jan Matejko, which is coming to the National for an exhibition next year.
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    • 1 hr 15 min

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