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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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    • Daily News

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?

    Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?

    In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Laurence D. Fink, the founder of the world’s largest asset management company, sparked the shift toward climate-focused corporate policies in his annual letter to C.E.O.’s. Here’s what the letter said, and why it matters.Protecting the environment and tackling climate change have climbed the list of Americans’ political priorities this year as economic concerns have faded. But the issue is as partisan as ever.

    • 25 min
    The Field: An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada

    The Field: An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call “the best insurance in America” — the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike — members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders’s “Medicare for All” plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union’s leaders may affect his support in the state’s caucuses on Saturday.

    Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Mr. Sanders, who is betting on the Latino vote to win the nomination, is trying to convince Nevada’s union members his policies are in their best interest. His rivals are trying to capitalize on the fight.The Nevada Democratic Party has been scrambling to put in effect safeguards in its caucuses to avoid the technical issues that created a debacle in Iowa. Here’s how the caucuses will work.

    • 42 min
    The Latest: The Nevada Debate

    The Latest: The Nevada Debate

    Last night, the Democratic debate in Nevada revealed more open hostility and made more personal attacks than in any of the previous six debates in the race for the nomination. Today, we explore what these attacks reflect about the state of the Democratic race and the urgency that the candidates are feeling.

    “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

    • 8 min
    A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 2

    A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 2

    Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard about the government’s failure to crack down on the explosive growth of child sexual abuse imagery online. In the second half of this series, we look at the role of the nation’s biggest tech companies, and why — despite pleas from victims — the illicit images remain online. Guest: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at the The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times, spoke with the mother and stepfather of a teenager who was sexually abused as a child. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: The tech industry has recently been more diligent in identifying online child sexual abuse imagery, but it has consistently failed to shut it down, a Times investigation found. Facebook accounted for more than 85 percent of the imagery flagged by tech companies last year.Two sisters opened up about their lives after being sexually abused as children. Photos and videos of them online continue to remind them of the horrors they experienced.Here’s the first episode in this two-part series, describing how a finding from a tipster led to The Times’s monthslong investigation of online child abuse imagery.

    • 26 min
    A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 1

    A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 1

    Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse.

    A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem — and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Last year, tech companies reported over 60 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.Here are six takeaways from The Times’s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.

    • 23 min
    Michael Bloomberg’s Not-So-Secret Weapon

    Michael Bloomberg’s Not-So-Secret Weapon

    Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he’s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign — and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Who is Mr. Bloomberg? And where does he stand on the key issues?We took a look at how Mr. Bloomberg’s enormous wealth helped build a national political network, and an empire of influence, for his campaign.His run has proved complicated to cover for the media empire he owns.

    • 32 min

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