114 episodes

War historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, presents this History Hit show about the most catastrophic wars in modern history. From the Seven Years War and the World Wars, to the Cold War and the War on Terror, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how conflict has shaped and changed our world. Each week, twice a week, James teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of ferocious global warfare, bloody revolutions, and violent ideological battles. Join us on the front line of military history.


Follow on Twitter @HistoryHitWW2.

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War historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, presents this History Hit show about the most catastrophic wars in modern history. From the Seven Years War and the World Wars, to the Cold War and the War on Terror, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how conflict has shaped and changed our world. Each week, twice a week, James teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of ferocious global warfare, bloody revolutions, and violent ideological battles. Join us on the front line of military history.


Follow on Twitter @HistoryHitWW2.

    The Battle of Okinawa

    The Battle of Okinawa

    The last major confrontation of the Second World War, and the largest amphibious assault of the Pacific theatre, the Battle of Okinawa ended in Allied victory but with massive casualties on both sides. To take us through the battle and explore the use of kamikaze pilots by the Japanese and the Atomic bomb by the United States, James welcomed Saul David onto Warfare. Saul is a professor of Military History at the Univ of Buckingham and author of Crucible of Hell.
     
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    • 45 min
    The British People and the Outbreak of World War Two

    The British People and the Outbreak of World War Two

    Our traditional understanding of the beginning of the Second World War in 1939 hinges on studies of Chamberlain and his fellow statesmen, but what about the general population? Frederick Taylor's latest book, 1939: A People’s History (The War Nobody Wanted), details the reactions and fears of ordinary British and German people in the face of the slide to war, between the Munich Crisis of September 1938 and Hitler’s invasion of Poland a little under a year later. In this episode, he and Dan discuss whether the British people were ready for war.
     
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    • 23 min
    Prince Philip's Military Service

    Prince Philip's Military Service

    During almost a century of life, Prince Philip dedicated seven decades to the service of Great Britain as the partner of Queen Elizabeth II. But in this episode of Warfare we’re going further back, to his time in the Royal Navy. Alex Churchill gives us a glimpse into the Duke of Edinburgh’s service during the Second World War, and the insight that this gives us into his character.


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    • 35 min
    Britain's Secret Army: The Resistance

    Britain's Secret Army: The Resistance

    What if the Battle of Britain had not been a success for the British? What was the plan had the Nazis successfully crossed the channel? Chris Pratt is the Curator of the Museum of the British Resistance Organisation, Parham Airfield. He joined James over a video call to talk about how the Auxiliary Units that made up the British resistance were formed, how they were trained and when, or whether, they came into use.


    The website for Parham Airfield Museum can be found here: http://www.parhamairfieldmuseum.co.uk/british-resistance-organisation/
     
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    • 28 min
    Kipling, Kingsley and Conan Doyle in the Boer War

    Kipling, Kingsley and Conan Doyle in the Boer War

    In early 1900, Rudyard Kipling, Mary Kingsley and Arthur Conan Doyle crossed paths in South Africa during the Anglo-Boer War. Motivated in various ways by notions of duty, service, patriotism and jingoism, they were each shaped by the theatre of war. Sarah LeFanu joined Dan Snow to explore the cultural legacies, controversial reputations and influence on colonial policy of these three British writers.
     
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    • 21 min
    From Nazi Gold to the Zinoviev Letter: Myth, Intrigue, and Conspiracy

    From Nazi Gold to the Zinoviev Letter: Myth, Intrigue, and Conspiracy

    Truth, rumour, conspiracy? Gill Bennett OBE had the job of sorting fact from fiction as chief historian of the Foreign Office from 1995-2005, and senior editor of its official history of British foreign policy, Documents on British Policy Overseas. During over thirty years as a historian at Whitehall, she provided historical advice to twelve foreign secretaries under six prime ministers, from Edward Heath to Tony Blair. In this conversation with James, Gill takes us through the biggest conspiracies of the World Wars. 


    Her book can be found here: https://www.amazon.com/Zinoviev-Letter-Conspiracy-that-Never/dp/0198767307
     
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    • 36 min

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