87 episodes

Each week, Colleen Dulle goes behind the headlines of the biggest Vatican news stories with America’s Rome correspondent Gerard O’Connell. They'll break down complicated news stories that have a whole lot of history behind them in an understandable, engaging way. Colleen and Gerard will give you the inside scoop on what people inside the Vatican are thinking, saying—and planning.

Inside The Vatican America Media

    • Christianity
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

Each week, Colleen Dulle goes behind the headlines of the biggest Vatican news stories with America’s Rome correspondent Gerard O’Connell. They'll break down complicated news stories that have a whole lot of history behind them in an understandable, engaging way. Colleen and Gerard will give you the inside scoop on what people inside the Vatican are thinking, saying—and planning.

    Update: Vatican releases handbook on sex abuse

    Update: Vatican releases handbook on sex abuse

    Today the Vatican released its long-awaited handbook, or “vademecum,” on how bishops and superiors of religious orders should handle allegations of sexual abuse against minors by clergy.
    This is the first time that all of the Vatican’s guidelines for handling abuse, from reporting to investigating and taking juridical action have been put together in one step-by-step format. In this special update episode of “Inside the Vatican,” host Colleen Dulle unpacks what’s new in the handbook and why it took a year and a half for the Vatican to develop this document.
    Links from the show:
    Vatican publishes handbook for bishops and religious superiors to guide response to abuse allegations

    • 5 min
    Is the church getting closer to ordaining women deacons?

    Is the church getting closer to ordaining women deacons?

    In April of this year, the Vatican announced the creation of a new commission to study the female diaconate, following up on Pope Francis’ promise to reopen the question at the behest of the Amazonian bishops.
    Pope Francis had set up a previous commission to study the roles of female deacons in the early church in 2016. Though that commission’s final report had not been published, the pope described its findings as inconclusive and the members as “toads from different wells.”
    This week, on our last episode of “Inside the Vatican” before our summer hiatus, producer Colleen Dulle speaks with one of that commission’s members, Hofstra University Professor Phyllis Zagano. We discuss the church’s history not only of ordaining women deacons, but also the recent history of the conversation around ordaining them again.
    When the new commission was named in April, some who favor reinstituting the female diaconate expressed concern that the many of the new commission’s members opposed ordaining women deacons. On this week’s show, Ms. Zagano, who favors ordaining women deacons, gives her take on the new commission: “Looking at the membership, they are, interestingly enough, qualified to answer a single question that I think still needs to be determined on behalf of the Holy Father, which is, what is the ministry of the diaconate today? … And if you describe that, then what about that can a woman not do?”
    Links from the show:
    Pope Francis has set up a new commission to study women deacons
    Women: Icons of Christ by Phyllis Zagano, via Paulist Press
    Review: Phyllis Zagano makes the case for women deacons
    Video: Women Deacons: Past, Present, Future with Phyllis Zagano and Bernard Pottier, S.J.
    Inside the Vatican Listener Survey

    • 21 min
    Benedict XVI makes surprise trip to Germany

    Benedict XVI makes surprise trip to Germany

    Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI left Italy for the first time in seven years last week, traveling to Germany to visit his ill brother, Georg. This week on “Inside the Vatican,” Gerry explains the challenges travel poses for the emeritus pope and why Benedict returned to the Vatican after only a few days.
    Since it is Colleen and Gerry’s last episode together before the summer break, the two also look ahead to the next few months. Gerry explains how the Pope spends his summers, and Colleen and Gerry discuss what’s next for the Vatican’s ongoing coronavirus response and the long-awaited Vatican report on former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick.
    Inside the Vatican will release a few special episodes this summer, beginning with an interview next week with researcher Phyllis Zagano about the two papal commissions to study women deacons.
    Finally, don’t forget to take our Inside the Vatican listener survey!
    Links from the show:
    Benedict XVI makes surprise visit to gravely ill brother in Germany Benedict XVI returns to Vatican after visiting his brother in Germany Podcast: What does the pope do on vacation? Inside the Vatican Listener Survey

    • 19 min
    Why is the Vatican silent on Archbishop Viganò?

    Why is the Vatican silent on Archbishop Viganò?

    Last week, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò was back in the spotlight after President Donald Trump tweeted promoting an open letter that Viganò had written to him. The letter praised Mr. Trump for “defending the right to life” and expressed Archbishop Viganò’s belief in a number of conspiracy theories, including the idea of a “deep state” group undermining the American government and a parallel group within the Catholic church.
    Archbishop Viganò has published many such letters since his original 11-page “testimony,” published in 2018, accusing a number of top church officials of knowing about abuse by former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, blaming a “homosexual network” in the Vatican for the abuse crisis, and calling on Pope Francis to resign. 
    The Vatican has been relatively tight-lipped in response to the archbishop: When journalists asked Pope Francis about the “testimony,” the pope refused to comment beyond saying, “Read that statement attentively and make your own judgment,” adding, “I think the statement speaks for itself, and you have a sufficient journalistic ability to make a conclusion.” Many of the archbishop’s claims have since been called into question, and the Vatican is conducting its own investigation into Mr. McCarrick.
    On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican reporter Gerard O’Connell and producer Colleen Dulle discuss why the Vatican has remained quiet in response to Archbishop Viganò and whether that is likely to change following President Trump’s endorsement.
    The hosts also discuss Pope Francis’ message for the World Day of the Poor, along with the new fund he established with the mayor of Rome and the governor of Lazio to aid workers who had not previously been eligible for government assistance.
    Links from the show:
    President Trump tweeted about Archbishop Viganò. So, who is he? Archbishop Viganò is aligning with Trump to stay in the spotlight. Pay him no attention. From 2018: Cardinal Marc Ouellet responds to Viganò charges, accuses him of blasphemy From 2018: It is time for Archbishop Viganò to meet the press Pope Francis’ message for the World Day of the Poor amid pandemic: We are all responsible Pope Francis sets up new fund for workers left out of coronavirus support

    • 22 min
    How Laudato Si’ changed American Catholics’ minds on climate change

    How Laudato Si’ changed American Catholics’ minds on climate change

    It’s been five years since the release of “Laudato Si’,” and Pope Francis has called for a year of prayer and study on the encyclical’s themes of integral human ecology—that is, the importance of protecting the environment and the poor, who are most directly affected by climate change and the destruction of nature.
    But five years out, as the church works with new resolve to implement “Laudato Si’,” it is worth asking: Did the document make a difference the first time around?
    On this episode of Inside the Vatican, I speak with Sam Winter-Levy and Bryan Schonfeld, two Princeton University doctoral candidates in sociology, who recently released a paper studying the impact of “Laudato Si’.” The two examined data sets from a survey of Americans’ opinions on climate change from before and after the encyclical’s release, and they found that among churchgoing Catholics, there was a significant shift towards belief that climate change is real and caused by humans, and that there is a moral imperative to take action on it.
    We discuss their findings, and what the results reveal about the role religious leaders like Pope Francis can have in shaping public opinion.

    Read more:
    Who can convince Americans to follow the science on coronavirus? Religious leaders. | The Washington Post Full Paper: Factual or Moral Persuasion in the United States? Evidence from the Papal Encyclical on Climate Change Website: Bryan Schonfeld Website: Sam Winter-Levy

    • 16 min
    Pope Francis: You can’t be racist and call yourself pro-life

    Pope Francis: You can’t be racist and call yourself pro-life

    Pope Francis spoke out on the police killing of George Floyd last week as protests against racism spread across the globe. This week on Inside the Vatican, veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O’Connell describes the protests in Europe and the change of heart some Europeans have had about racism in their countries.
    Pope Francis made his position on the death of George Floyd clear as he called two American bishops to thank them for speaking out against racism. One, Bishop Mark Seitz of El Paso, had been photographed kneeling with a Black Lives Matter sign; the other was Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. On the show, Gerry and producer Colleen Dulle unpack the pope’s statement that “we cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life.”
    The hosts also give an update on the recent arrest of one of the two Italian real estate brokers who profited from the Vatican’s controversial London real estate deal. Gerry explains what role Gianluigi Torzi, the broker who was arrested, played in the deal and what questions remain to be answered in the Vatican’s ongoing investigation.
    Links from the show:
    Pope Francis calls U.S. bishops to offer prayers amid George Floyd protests Pope Francis on the death of George Floyd: We cannot tolerate racism and claim to defend life Vatican arrests businessman in shady London real estate deal Podcast: The Vatican’s $200 million London real estate scandal, explained

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Christianity

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by America Media