109 episodes

Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust & Wildlife Trusts ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natural world and how it inspires us as human beings. All episodes available at: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/
Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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Trees A Crowd David Oakes

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 4 Ratings

Ever wondered what happens when you fill a cello with bees? Or how robins have successfully colonised the outer-reaches of our universe? Or why the world is destined to be populated purely by female turtles? This podcast celebrates nature and the stories of those who care deeply for it. Join artist, actor and Woodland Trust & Wildlife Trusts ambassador David Oakes, for a series of informal, relaxed conversations with artists, scientists, creatives and environmentalists as they celebrate the beauty of the natural world and how it inspires us as human beings. All episodes available at: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/
Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Leigh Morris: Sexy carrots & feral wallabies - the adventures and curiosities hidden behind Manannan’s cloak

    Leigh Morris: Sexy carrots & feral wallabies - the adventures and curiosities hidden behind Manannan’s cloak

    Midway through the Isle of Man’s Manx TT motor-racing festival lies a day (terrifyingly aptly) branded as “Mad Sunday”. David Oakes chose this bacchanalian festival, one filled with inebriated petrol-heads and super-charged exhaust eruptions, to talk with the Manx Wildlife Trust’s CEO, Leigh Morris. Recorded in perhaps the only two quiet enclaves the island possessed that Mad Sunday, Leigh expands upon a journey that took him from horticultural nurseryman to the head of a Wildlife Trust that oversees the planet’s sole Unesco whole nation biosphere. Leigh’s journey - starting simply enough in Yorkshire, then Wales and Scotland - quickly expands into a life of volunteering and vocational placements in India and Nepal, Ethiopia and Oman, the Galapagos and St Helena… the list goes on. Whether upon an island paradise or beneath the waves, there is seemingly no habitat that hasn’t drawn Leigh’s attention. In his own words: “The more you know, the more you know you don’t know…” Armed with an insatiable curiosity, Leigh hopes to turn the Isle of Man, all 35 by 10 miles of it, into “what good looks like”. In this episode we discusses the sex-appeal of carrots, the rivakry of a petrol vs. electic (or even hydrogen) powereded TT, community conservation movements such as SeaSearch, and the hot potato of viewing agriculture as a very necessary part of our species’ ongoing environmental ambitions. Filter in a menagerie of rare Loaghtan sheep, Penguins, Sea Iguanas and the Isle of Man’s escaped feral Wallaby population, and you have a gloriously ambitious discussion about the state of the world, and where to take it next. Oh - and October’s episode is not sponsored by the Visit Isle of Man board… we promise!
    For further information on this and other episodes, visit: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/leigh-morris/
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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    • 1 hr 14 min
    Dr Amy-Jane Beer: The 3 R’s of Nature Writing - Reading, Roaming and the Radial symmetry of Sea Urchin larvae

    Dr Amy-Jane Beer: The 3 R’s of Nature Writing - Reading, Roaming and the Radial symmetry of Sea Urchin larvae

    Upon Salisbury Plain - nestled amongst exploding ordnance and dim-witted Tawny Owl fledgelings - the child that would become Dr Amy-Jane Beer found both a love for nature and a love for adventure. Training originally as a biologist, Amy grew into one of Britain’s best loved nature writers. Whether articles in British Wildlife, diary entires for the Guardian’s ‘Country Diary’, or her latest book “The Flow” (which explores our relationships with Britain’s numerous wild water ways), Amy’s writing exposes personal and oft-spiritual experiences to illuminate nature and science for wider audiences. An active participant of both the Right to Roam movement and the New Networks for Nature alliance (the former hoping to unlock the many health benefits attained through access to green spaces, and the latter exploring how creative inspiration can be drawn from British wildlife) Amy believes that a human right to linger, explore and create is “amazing compost” for the mind, body and soul. Amy is a scientist that places great value upon love, upon magic and upon the power of motherhood, as well as upon the intricacies of the radial symmetry of sea urchin larvae! Hopefully she will inspire you to seek the benefits of learning to trespass like a river. For further information on this and other episodes, visit: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/dr-amy-jane-beer/
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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    • 53 min
    Dr Gavin Broad: Broadening horizons with Darwin's wasps and other tales of cannibalism, incest and zombies

    Dr Gavin Broad: Broadening horizons with Darwin's wasps and other tales of cannibalism, incest and zombies

    Dr Gavin Broad’s love of nature was initially inspired by the birdlife of the Wirral. However, the summer lull in avian activity lead the 15-year-old Broad towards an interest in moths, and from there it was only a zombie caterpillar away from the creatures that were to inspire his professional identity and take him as far afield as Chile; Parasitoid wasps! “Darwin Wasps” account for 10% of all British insects - that’s over 7000 distinct wasps - and Broad insists that everyone can easily “admire them, if not like them.” What’s not to like about an insect that can inject its eggs through the bark of a tree and into another insect? Or one that can actively dictate the gender of its offspring to specifically regulate the extant population? Or one that can easily defeat a tarantula?! Quite. David heads to the Natural History Museum to talk Wasps, and to discuss Gavin’s involvement in sequencing the genomes of 70,000 British species - everything from Deep Sea Squid to Pine Marten - his appreciation for the work of Damien Hirst and the similarities it bears to the NHM’s hidden insect archives, and how we would all be far better off if we possessed the curiosity of bored Victorian clergymen. For further information on this and other episodes, visit: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/dr-gavin-broad
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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    • 57 min
    Lost on Lundy: The hidden treasures of a wildlife landmark; aka, “David adventures to Puffin Island!”

    Lost on Lundy: The hidden treasures of a wildlife landmark; aka, “David adventures to Puffin Island!”

    Since the late 1960s, Lundy Island - just off the north coast of Devon and measuring only half a mile wide at its widest point - has been owned and operated by two British charities; the National Trust and the Landmark Trust. Prior to this, Lundy was owned by wealthy megalomaniacs, pirates, gamblers, revolutionaries, neolithic fisher-people, and a whole array of wildlife. In this week's episode, David Oakes visits Lundy to speak with the island's current wildlife wardens, Rosie Ellis and Stuart Cossey. Rosie, a marine specialist, enthuses about the marine protected areas and no take zone that surround much of the island. These are waters that harbour grey seals, minke whales and basking sharks, as well as spiny lobsters, sea slugs, and a stunning array of rare corals. Stuart - the island's resident "bird guy" - explains that despite being named for one of the island's most colourful avian inhabitants ('lund' is the Old Norse word for 'Puffin'), Lundy is actually far more exciting due to its Manx Shearwater population. The majority of the UK's Manx Shearwaters breed on Lundy, and as such Stuart takes David out at sunset to ring a few of these amazing creatures. All of that, as well as pygmy shrews, the world's rarest cabbage, and a tale of why Rosie spent much of the Covid-19 lockdown on Lundy walking around collecting animal droppings, and you've got a tiny island (and brimming podcast) that punches far above its weight. For further information on this and other episodes, visit: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/lundy/
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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    • 42 min
    Bonus Beatrice: Bearded Seals & Ice Flowers - further stories from the ice sheets

    Bonus Beatrice: Bearded Seals & Ice Flowers - further stories from the ice sheets

    A little bonus Bea that we couldn't quite squeeze into this month's main episode. Enjoy!
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
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    • 4 min
    Beatrice von Preussen: All the little things that inspired an artist to travel from pole to pole

    Beatrice von Preussen: All the little things that inspired an artist to travel from pole to pole

    In her Brighton studio, the artist, explorer, science communicator and self-professed 'child', Beatrice von Preussen, explores her obsession with "little things". Whether tadpole, snail shell, wax-worm or fossilised prehistoric crustacean, Bea explains how it is the small things that have made her dream big. Here she discusses her journey to the arctic - where she spent weeks alone during the sun-drenched midsummer, armed with pencils, paper, (an emergency rifle for polar bear repellant), and the dream of using the world's most-northerly printing press. But whether etchings of newts, or being invited by the Spanish army to explore an active volcano in the antarctic, it is the joy of story-telling that inspires her, and drives her to teach the next generation about our inspirational planet. For further information on this and other episodes, visit: https://www.treesacrowd.fm/beatrice-von-preussen/
    Weekly episodes available early AND bonus content made free to forage by "Subscribtion Squirrels" on our Patreon.
    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

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