218 episodes

The Spectator's flagship podcast featuring discussions and debates on the best features from the week's edition. Presented by Lara Prendergast and William Moore.

The Edition The Spectator

    • News

The Spectator's flagship podcast featuring discussions and debates on the best features from the week's edition. Presented by Lara Prendergast and William Moore.

    The red line: Biden and Xi's secret Ukraine talks

    The red line: Biden and Xi's secret Ukraine talks

    On this week's podcast:

    Could China be the key to peace in Ukraine?

    In his cover piece for the magazine this week Owen Matthews reveals the covert but decisive role China is playing in the Ukraine war. He is joined by The Spectator's Cindy Yu, to discuss what Xi's motivations are (00:53). 

    Also this week: 

    Harriet Sergeant writes that the Iran is at war with its own children as it cracks down on young protesters. She is joined by Ali Ansari, founding director if the Institute for Iranian Studies, to consider the fragility of the Iranian regime (14:32). 

    And finally: 

    Julie Bindel says in the magazine this week that after recent controversy the Society of Authors is no longer fit for purpose. She is joined by historian, author, and former chair of the society Tom Holland, to debate whether it's time to replace the institution (23:56). 

    Hosted by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson. 

    • 37 min
    The squeeze: how long will the pain last?

    The squeeze: how long will the pain last?

    This week:

    How long will the pain last?

    The Spectator's economics editor Kate Andrews asks this in her cover piece this week, reflecting on Rishi Sunak and Jeremy Hunt's autumn statement. She joins the podcast with Professor David Miles, economy expert at the Office for Budget Responsibility, to discuss the new age of austerity (00:58).

    Also on the podcast:

    After Donald Trump announced that he will be running for office in 2024, Freddy Gray writes in the magazine about the never ending Trump campaign. He speaks to Joe Walsh, 2020 Republican presidential candidate, about whether Trump could win the nomination (18:42).

    And finally:

    In the arts lead in The Spectator Mathew Lyons celebrates the bleak brilliance of the Peanuts comic strip. He is joined by Christian Adams, political cartoonist at the Evening Standard and long-time fan of the strip (29:02). 

    Hosted by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson. 

    • 39 min
    Midterm madness

    Midterm madness

    On the podcast:

    In his cover piece for the magazine, The Spectator's deputy editor Freddy Gray says the only clear winner from the US midterms is paranoia. He is joined by The Spectator's economics editor Kate Andrews to discuss whether the American political system is broken (00:52).

    Also this week:

    Isabel Hardman writes that Ed Miliband is the power behind Kier Starmer's Labour. She is joined by former Labour advisor Lord Stewart Wood of Anfield, to consider whether Starmer is wise to lend his ear to the former Leader of the Opposition (12:48).

    And finally:

    King Charles III is known for his love of classical music, and Damian Thompson writes in this week's arts lead that he is the most musical monarch since Queen Victoria. He is joined by editor of Gramophone magazine Martin Cullingford, to examine the great royal tradition of musicality (25:32). 

    Presented by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson.

    • 37 min
    At sea: can Sunak navigate the migrant crisis?

    At sea: can Sunak navigate the migrant crisis?

    On this week's podcast:

    Can Rishi Sunak steady the ship?

    Patrick O'Flynn argues in his cover piece for The Spectator that the asylum system is broken. He is joined by Sunder Katwala, director of the think tank British Future, to consider what potential solutions are open to the Prime Minister to solve the small boats crisis (00:52).

    Also this week:

    Should we give Elon Musk a break?

    In the aftermath of his sensational purchase of Twitter, Mary Wakefield writes in defence of the tech billionaire. She is joined by James Ball, global editor of The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, to ask what his plans are for the social media platform (14:27).

    And finally:

    Ysenda Maxtone Graham writes in the magazine this week about the joy of hating the Qatar World Cup. She is joined by Spectator columnist Rod Liddle to lament why we may have to get used to tournaments like this one. (24:47). 

    Hosted by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson. 

    • 35 min
    Is Rishi ready?

    Is Rishi ready?

    On this week's podcast:

    We have a new prime minister, but is Rishi Sunak ready to take on the numerous problems that James Forsyth outlines in his cover piece for The Spectator this week? James is joined by writer and pollster Matt Goodwin to debate whether the Conservatives can turn it around in time for 2024 (00:50). 

    Also this week:

    Is the future of feminism conservative?

    Louise Perry writes for the magazine this week that there has been a rightward shift in feminist thought, spearheaded by mothers coalescing online. She is joined by Victoria Smith, author of Hags: The Demonisation of Middle-Aged Women (15:30).

    And finally:

    The Spectator's diary editor James Heale and the Sun's political editor Harry Cole, are the authors of the new book Out of the Blue: The Unexpected Rise and Rapid Fall of Liz Truss. Now immortalised as a Twitter meme, they discuss the agony of rewrites and trying to keep pace with Truss's doomed premiership (28:09). 

    Hosted by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson.

    • 37 min
    The lady vanishes

    The lady vanishes

    On this week's podcast: 

    After the markets saw off Kwarteng, Trussonomics and now Truss herself, James Forsyth writes in The Spectator that the markets will be driving British politics for the foreseeable future. He is joined by Britain economics editor at the Economist Soumaya Keynes to discuss the institutions now dictating government policy (00:56).

    Also this week:

    Looking ahead to the American midterms next month, are we heading for a 'red wave'? Freddy Gray says in his piece for the magazine that the Democrats could be in for a shellacking come November. He is joined by Washington editor at Spectator World, Amber Athey (13:41).

    And finally:

    Should the Parthenon Marbles be returned to Athens?

    In The Spectator this week, Noel Malcolm says this age-old question is far from simple. He is joined by Lord Vaizey, chair of the new advisory board The Parthenon Project, to consider whether we can really justify keeping the Elgin Marbles in the British Museum (21:00). 

    Hosted by William Moore. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson. 

    • 40 min

Top Podcasts In @@categoryName@@

The Spectator
The Spectator
The Spectator
The Spectator
That's Life!
The Spectator

You Might Also Like

The Spectator
The Spectator
The Spectator
The Telegraph
The Times
The Telegraph