11 episodes

In 1911, just three decades after the sport of football came to India, a group of Bengali men sent shockwaves across the entire British Empire. The Amor Ekadosh, or “Immortal Eleven,” competing in one of the oldest football tournaments in the world, did so without boots on their feet. Unafraid to go toe-to-toe with their colonisers, they showed a country what freedom felt like–long before its citizens were free. Konkona Sen Sharma brings the remarkable story, once erased from history, to life. Learn more at https://luminary.link/barefoot

Barefoot Boys Luminary

    • Sports
    • 3.8 • 10 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

In 1911, just three decades after the sport of football came to India, a group of Bengali men sent shockwaves across the entire British Empire. The Amor Ekadosh, or “Immortal Eleven,” competing in one of the oldest football tournaments in the world, did so without boots on their feet. Unafraid to go toe-to-toe with their colonisers, they showed a country what freedom felt like–long before its citizens were free. Konkona Sen Sharma brings the remarkable story, once erased from history, to life. Learn more at https://luminary.link/barefoot

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    British Conceptions

    British Conceptions

    It’s 1857. British soldiers play football in the barracks of Bengal, but Bengalis—with their “delicate limbs”—aren’t welcome to play ball. How could India come to be known as “the Brazil of Asia”? In this episode, we meet the Immortal Eleven.

    Hear the entire series at https://luminary.link/barefoot

    • 19 min
    The Father of Indian Football

    The Father of Indian Football

    We meet Nagendraprasad Sarbadhikari, founding father of Indian football. He showed Indians that they could not only express their masculinity, but also beat the British at their own sport.

    No Boots? No Problem.

    No Boots? No Problem.

    Nagendra marries into the Sovabazaar family, and starts a football club in its name. The British are baffled when the Indians show up…barefoot.

    Mohun Bagan’s Palatial Origins

    Mohun Bagan’s Palatial Origins

    Three royal families set out to find a proper setting for a football club, and find it in the Mohun Bagan marble palace. Bagan’s start is rocky, but the winds of change—sporting and political—start to gather speed.

    Kicked Into Shape

    Kicked Into Shape

    Former army man Sailen Bose shakes things up at Mohun Bagan, kicking (literally) the players into shape. The British decide to partition Bengal, in furtherance of the strategy of ‘Divide and Rule,’ but Bengal rises in protest. For inspiration, people begin to look to indigenous scientific innovators, nationalist writers and…footballers.

    The Bhaduri Brothers

    The Bhaduri Brothers

    With the help of the Bhaduri Brothers, the Immortal Eleven ascend the ranks—all the way to the 1905 Gladstone Cup. Bengalis from all over travel to Chinsurah in the hopes of witnessing a victory against the British neatly packaged into a football tournament.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Sutapa Dutta ,

Enjoyed it immensely

Only Konkona could have given life to such a beautiful story.

Would have loved to find the names of the writers though in the description

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