7 episodes

HIV is one of the worst epidemics in human history, and has had a devastating impact on populations worldwide. Our HIV podcasts describe the leading efforts by NDM researchers to develop new treatments and possible vaccines for HIV, as well as to understand and prevent its transmission, to help reduce the global HIV disease burden and improve outcomes for patients worldwide.

HIV Oxford University

    • Courses

HIV is one of the worst epidemics in human history, and has had a devastating impact on populations worldwide. Our HIV podcasts describe the leading efforts by NDM researchers to develop new treatments and possible vaccines for HIV, as well as to understand and prevent its transmission, to help reduce the global HIV disease burden and improve outcomes for patients worldwide.

    • video
    Reducing HIV

    Reducing HIV

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a stigmatised group in Africa, but a predominant actor in the transmission of HIV. Professor Eduard Sanders is interested in putting together public health interventions to reduce HIV transmission in vulnerable populations, facilitating the early diagnosis of acute HIV infections and preventing its further spread. He also researches bacterial sexually transmitted infections in high risk populations, and HIV-1 early treatment trials. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    Can we eradicate HIV?

    Can we eradicate HIV?

    Dr John Frater talks about his research into finding a cure for HIV. It is increasingly apparent that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may not be the long-term solution to the management of HIV infection, and that other avenues need to be explored. As a result of various recent cases, the idea of eradicating HIV altogether is becoming less unimaginable to some scientists. Dr John Frater's work focuses on quantification of viral reservoirs, sequence analysis, immunology, as well as fundamental research into new approaches for the eradication of HIV. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    How can we live with HIV?

    How can we live with HIV?

    Dr Lucy Dorrell tells us how our immune system controls HIV and how we can live with this virus. There are currently around 91,000 people in the UK living with HIV/AIDS. HIV is a challenging target for a vaccine because it can mutate its genetic makeup. Dr Lucy Dorrell aims to develop immunotherapy to reduce dependence on antiretroviral therapy (ART), the current standard treatment for those infected with HIV-1. Worldwide, 9 million of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV/AIDS today are not able to access the ARTs which they are in immediate need of. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 3 min
    • video
    Aiming for a HIV vaccine

    Aiming for a HIV vaccine

    Professor Sir Andrew McMichael tells us about recent developments in the search for a vaccine against HIV. As HIV infection continues to spread, particularly in developing countries there is an urgent need for a vaccine. After investigating the immune response to flu virus, Professor Sir Andrew McMichael turned his attention to HIV. Professor McMichael's current lines of research include analysing early molecular events in HIV infection, T cell immune response to HIV and the use of vaccination to control HIV infection. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    HIV and children in Africa

    HIV and children in Africa

    Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones tells us about her work on HIV with children in Africa. HIV behaves very differently in children: while most adults are able to control the virus after infection, children often struggle to do so, resulting in an extremely high mortality rate. Professor Sarah Rowland-Jones aims to contribute to the design of vaccines and immunotherapies against HIV infection, including HIV-2 infection, for both adults and children, in developing countries where an effective vaccine is desperately needed. Her work mainly focuses on anti-viral immunity, and in particular how immune responses modify the outcome of HIV infection. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    HIV Vaccine Development

    HIV Vaccine Development

    Professor Tomas Hanke tells us about his research on HIV vaccine development. The enormous variations in HIV present big challenges in the development of a vaccine. Professor Tomáš Hanke focuses on the most conserved regions of the HIV-1 proteome, with the aim of developing a vaccine for both adult and mother-to-child transmission. Professor Hanke's group tests novel ideas and vaccine strategies, and focusses on a safe but rapid translation of the most promising laboratory results to phase I/II clinical trials in human volunteers. The ultimate goal is to develop a safe, effective and accessible HIV vaccine. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min

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