31 episodi

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet.
Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishing creatures, landscapes and elements in it. Close your eyes and open your ears as you travel from the impenetrable forests of Uganda to research bases in the Antarctic; the edges of the Thar Desert to the Shores of Lake Tahoe. You’ll get up close and personal with jewelled beetles in the Namib Desert and soar with eagles in Rajasthan as you experience tales of human emotion, of encounters with animals, of the strangest corners of the Earth and breath-taking marvels. All carefully gathered together and delivered into your ear by the good people at BBC Earth.
From the deepest caves in the world to the very edge of space the BBC Earth podcast transports you on an awe-inspiring journey in sound.

BBC Earth Podcas‪t‬ BBC Earth

    • Località e viaggi
    • 4.3 • 7 valutazioni

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet.
Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishing creatures, landscapes and elements in it. Close your eyes and open your ears as you travel from the impenetrable forests of Uganda to research bases in the Antarctic; the edges of the Thar Desert to the Shores of Lake Tahoe. You’ll get up close and personal with jewelled beetles in the Namib Desert and soar with eagles in Rajasthan as you experience tales of human emotion, of encounters with animals, of the strangest corners of the Earth and breath-taking marvels. All carefully gathered together and delivered into your ear by the good people at BBC Earth.
From the deepest caves in the world to the very edge of space the BBC Earth podcast transports you on an awe-inspiring journey in sound.

    The man-made forest that led to extinction

    The man-made forest that led to extinction

    There are few places on our planet that have not in some way been shaped by humans. We’re looking at how, for better or worse, we’ve made a mark on our world, and whether it’s possible to escape the influence of us.


    To begin, we travel to Aldabra - an idyllic coral atoll in the Indian ocean. It’s one of the most remote places in the world, home to giant tortoises and very little human intrusion. Yet even in this largely uninhabited spot, traces of humanity can be found.


    Next we’ll be exploring an island far away from anywhere else, right in the middle of the Atlantic. Ascension Island is an arid landscape. But it’s also home to a lush man-made tropical forest. What lessons can we learn from one of humanity’s largest ever landscaping projects?


    To finish, we’ll hear from journalist Judith D. Schwartz. She explains how human influence - even that thousands of years in the making - has and can be reversed. 


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    To find out more about David Attenborough’s stunning natural world series, A Perfect Planet, visit the BBC Earth website: bbcearth.com


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
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    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 27 min
    A wombat ate my homework

    A wombat ate my homework

    We’re exploring the theme of recovery, delving into times when we’ve stepped in to help save our natural world, and looking at the moments when it’s come to our rescue too.
     
    We’ll be starting off in the sea off the West Coast of Africa where a crew member from the latest David Attenborough series, A Perfect Planet, will take us behind the scenes on an eye-opening rescue mission.
     
    We’ll then meet the Bloom family, whose lives were turned around following a life-changing accident. The road to recovery came in the unexpected form of a mischievous Australian magpie.
     
    Finally, we’ll burrow into the world of wombats and meet a woman who has journeyed through much of life’s ups and downs with these four-legged creatures at her side.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    To find out more about David Attenborough’s stunning natural world series, A Perfect Planet, visit the BBC Earth website: bbcearth.com


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 33 min
    Saving a species through sound

    Saving a species through sound

    In this week’s episode of the BBC Earth podcast we’ll be looking to solve some of the natural world’s mysteries.


    Starting off in North West Honduras, we’ll hear from ethnobiologist and sound artist Ben Mirin who set out to discover the voice of a previously voiceless animal. The exquisite spike-thumb frog is a critically endangered species. Recording its voice could help save this frog. The only problem is, nobody actually knows what it sounds like.


    We’ll also be taken on a personal journey of discovery with a woman who has become known on the tiny island of Guam in Micronesia as the ‘Manta Mum’. Julie Hartup is a microbiologist who has spent over a decade studying the enigmatic Manta Rays. She explains how a simple hypothesis led to a beautiful discovery.


    Finally, we’ll speak to marine biologist Dr Edith Widder who has spent most of her career trying to communicate with the animals that live in our oceans.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    To find out more about David Attenborough’s stunning natural world series, A Perfect Planet, visit the BBC Earth website: bbcearth.com


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 32 min
    Fire ants floating for survival

    Fire ants floating for survival

    We're exploring what the natural world can teach us about teamwork. We'll learn how in some of the most remote locations and harshest conditions, strength can come in numbers.


    In the Amazon rainforests in Northern Peru, tiny creatures have found an ingenious way to tackle the annual floods. With the help of a crew member from the landmark series, A Perfect Planet, we'll be floating alongside fire ants forming a living raft.


    Tens of thousands of penguins make the journey from the sea to a spot in the Antarctic to breed. For them, sticking together is crucial for surviving such harsh conditions.


    Finally, we'll hear about slime mould. To prevent starving, genetically different strains of slime mould come together. But within this system exist loners. What can they teach us about the evolution of social behaviours?


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    To find out more about David Attenborough’s stunning natural world series, A Perfect Planet, visit the BBC Earth website: bbcearth.com


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 28 min
    Looking for mushrooms, finding happiness

    Looking for mushrooms, finding happiness

    We're journeying into hidden worlds, exploring nature that offers much more than what initially meets the eye. We travel to locations that continue to thrive against the odds.


    When Long Litt Woon's life drastically changed, she turned to the secretive world of mushrooms to manage her grief. She tells us how these visible fungi are just one tiny part of a vast and complex organism that lives beneath our feet.


    We'll hear how a crew member filming the latest David Attenborough series, A Perfect Planet, managed to document the life of a creature measuring the size of an apostrophe: the fig wasp.


    Finally we go to Ethiopia, where small pockets of forest surrounding churches continue to thrive.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth podcast.


    As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or a story that amazed, surprised or moved you…


    To find out more about David Attenborough’s stunning natural world series, A Perfect Planet, visit the BBC Earth website: bbcearth.com.


    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 26 min
    Baby iguanas born inside a volcano

    Baby iguanas born inside a volcano

    We’re back with new discoveries and awe-inspiring moments, taking you to a world far beyond your own four walls.


    The wildlife photographer and adventurer Tui De Roy explores one of the most hostile spots on Earth: the mouth of a volcano on Fernandina Island. The inside of the volcano is a barren place, but surprising life exists - in the form of tiny iguanas. 


    Jason Ward’s encounter with a Peregrine falcon from the window of his homeless shelter in the Bronx led towards a lasting love affair with the natural world. 
    The birder and science communicator explains how you don’t have to travel as far as you might think to get up close to nature. 


    Connections with the world around us can be found in even the most trying of times. 
    Elisabeth Bailey’s mystery illness led to an unlikely companionship with a forest snail. She shares some surprising facts about these creatures, including the sound of a wild snail eating.


    Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Earth Podcast. As ever, we love hearing from you on social media, so do share with us your favourite episode so far or story that amazed, surprised or moved you…
     
    Website: www.bbcearth.com
    Facebook: www.facebook.com/bbcearth/
    Instagram: www.instagram.com/bbcearth/
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/bbcearth
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 30 min

Recensioni dei clienti

4.3 su 5
7 valutazioni

7 valutazioni

Top podcast nella categoria Località e viaggi

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