25 episodi

An exploration of British slang for English learners, native speakers and anyone in between. Giving you a chance to hear, understand the origins and meanings of new slang and to use it immediately!

The Slang Podcast - Learn British English Now The Slang Podcast

    • Impara le lingue

An exploration of British slang for English learners, native speakers and anyone in between. Giving you a chance to hear, understand the origins and meanings of new slang and to use it immediately!

    Money Slang Special - What's the meaning of Pound, Quid, Nicker and Squid in British Slang?

    Money Slang Special - What's the meaning of Pound, Quid, Nicker and Squid in British Slang?

    In our most recent episodes we are discussing slang words for money! Something key when travelling to a different country or even speaking a new language! Today we will be examining slang words for the British Pound Coin.

    The most common slang word used for a pound is a quid, a word I use frequently to the confusion of my Italian friends. A quid is equal to 100 pence, and it is generally believed to come from the Latin phrase “quid pro quo,” which translates into "something for something," or an equal exchange for goods or services. It is always used in the singular, so one speaks of 'ten quid' or 'fifty quid', never of 'quids'. This is pretty widely used throughout the country, but a rather old term.

    What is a newer one I hear you ask? Well its the word nicker N-I-C-K-E-R, this term has much stronger London associations and dates from early this century. Not pluralised for a number of pounds, eg:

    - "It cost me twenty nicker"

    Its origins stem for the word N-I-C-K, a word we explored some episodes ago. If you have forgotten go back and check it out! As we found out then 'Nick' has a wide variety of meanings based on cheating, snatching, and stealing. Maybe, a one pound coin was viewed as an item of currency worth nicking and became known as a nicker.

    Last and maybe my favourite slang word for 1 pound is a squid S-Q-U-I-D, yes as in the eight armed sea creature. Not normally pluralised, still expressed as 'squid', not squids, e.g., 'Fifty squid'. The most likely origin of this slang expression is from a joke in 1960-70s about a shark who meets his friend the whale one day, and says:

    - "I'm glad I bumped into you - here's that squid I owe you.."

    So having a squid, quid or a nicker is usually always a good thing, especially if you are on your way to the pub!

    Next episode we will be exploring more ways to discuss money in slang, so don’t miss it!

    That’s our episode of the day, let’s catch up soon to talk more about slang terms for money. You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 min
    Money Slang Special - What's the meaning of Moolah, Bread, Dough and Wedge in British Slang?

    Money Slang Special - What's the meaning of Moolah, Bread, Dough and Wedge in British Slang?

    Today we will be talking about money, something universal….however us brits have found many words and phrases to use when talking about it.

    While the origins of these slang terms are many and various, certainly a lot of English money slang is rooted in various London communities, many sectors such as with street traders and gangs developed their own specific slang, which has produce some strange interpretations commonly used today.....so we are going to explore them now!

    Our first word for money is Bread B-R-E-A-D. In formal English this refers to the food but within slang it represents money. This term stems from cockney rhyming slang and metaphoric use of 'bread'. Bread or bread and honey rhymes with = money. Bread also has associations with money, in a metaphorical sense as it can traced back to the Bible. Bread in the sense of money is also linked with the expression 'earning a crust', which alludes to having enough money to pay for one's daily bread.

    Closely linked to this phrase, another word for money is dough D-O-U-G-H which appears to be based on "bread". Both words have been popular slang for money since the 1930s.

    They could be used like this:

    - "Do you have any dough? Or do we need to go to a bank?"
    - "Its ok I have some bread for a pint at the pub"

    Ok moving on to our next word for money which is Moolah M-O-O-L-A-H. If you have a lot of moolah, you're rich, you have plenty of cash. The word "Moolah" has an Indian origin. Moolah, in Hindi, means the root cause of something. This this slang word has many implications for the way we view money, that it is the root of all!

    Last but not least we have Wedge W-E-D-G-E. In formal english a wedge is a triangular shaped tool, used to split open an object. Its connotations with money arise from when coins could be split into quarters so exact weights could be measured. The shape of these sections was a wedge. Nowadays "a wedge" is a pay-packet amount of money or the amount someone earns.

    So there we go! Many ways to say money...

    Next time you are with an english speaker and they ask you for a wedge, some bread or a bit of moolah you know what they are talking about!

    Tune in to our next episode to find out how we can refer to a pound coin in slang, and trust me there are many ways.

    That’s our episode of the day, you can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 min
    Internet Slang Special - People on the internet (TROLL, LURKER, BAE)

    Internet Slang Special - People on the internet (TROLL, LURKER, BAE)

    Today we will be exploring more social media slang, in particular how do we identify the sea of people on social media, from trolls to baes...what are they and what do they mean?! Now is your chance to find out so lets get started...

    So in formal English a Troll T-R-O-L-L is a character from fairytales, usually an ugly creature depicted as either a giant or a dwarf. However online it means something much different or perhaps even worse.

    In Internet slang, a troll is a person who who deliberately starts arguments or says offensive things online, for the troll's amusement or a specific gain. Both the noun and the verb forms of "troll" are associated with Internet discourse. However, the word has also been used more widely. Media attention in recent years has equated trolling with online harassment. In a sentence we could use the verb like this:

    - "Someone left a nasty comment on my facebook post"
    - "Ignore them, they are just trolling you.’

    They are horrible people so watch out for them when you are online! Trolls usually post or respond to comments in a way that will annoy or anger the most people possible. There’s a saying online:

    - "Don’t feed the trolls."

    This means you shouldn’t interact with someone who is “trolling,” since it will only encourage them. You usually find trolls hanging out on forums, but they can be anywhere online, from your Facebook, to the comments section on a news article.

    Ok number two, someone who is not as bad as a troll but still seen in a negative light, a lurker spelt L-U-R-K-E-R. This is someone who visits a forum, blog or website often, but doesn’t leave any comments. The word stems from formal english as "to lurk" means to hide just out of sight. A lurker could also be one who never messages on group chats but simply reads. I must admit during busy work times I find myself doing the same on many group chats. The word could be used as so:

    - "On my new blog I really want my lurkers to comment, so I’m going to have a competition!"

    Ok last but not least we have bae B-A-E a term of affection for a romantic partner, thought to have come from "baby" or "babe". In fact "bae", is an acronym that stands for "before anyone else".

    You will find this word all over social media, especially if you are following a very cringey couple. Ironically and quite unromantically bae in Danish means poop and to worsen things it means "bye" in Icelandic.

    That's our episode of the day, you can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.

    • 3 min
    Internet Slang Special - English Social Media (AMA, IRL, GTG, BRB)

    Internet Slang Special - English Social Media (AMA, IRL, GTG, BRB)

    Today we will be exploring more social media slang! The internet is super important when learning a new language as social media is something that allows you to connect with people from all over the world.

    So let’s have a look now at how to navigate the rabbit hole that is social media abbreviations. As most online slang words are acronyms, they will be our focus for today.

    To start with we have AMA meaning ‘ask me anything’. The AMA was first made popular on the sharing forum and community, Reddit. Short for “Ask Me Anything,” an AMA is when someone, usually well-known or from an interesting background, goes online and answers questions posed by the community. I would suggest writing on another's or creating your own AMA as it is the perfect way to practice English!

    Ok our next is acronym is IRL meaning ‘in real life’ When you’re talking about something that exists offline, you can use IRL. For example: My screen name is PerfectChef because I’m a chef IRL. If you have been chatting to someone online you may want to take a risk and actually meet them IRL!

    To finish off this episode I want to tell you two ways of saying goodbye in internet slang! The first is GTG meaning got to go, showing the person you are talking to you are in a bit of a rush and will not be online from now on.

    The second is to show you will be gone for a bit but will be back soon BRB, meaning be right back, and that’s what we will be!

    That’s our episode of today. Next episode we will be looking at more social media slang especially for how we address people online, so make sure you give it a listen!

    You can find us on our website the https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 2 min
    Internet Slang Special - English Social Media (DM, SELFIE, FOMO, TBT)

    Internet Slang Special - English Social Media (DM, SELFIE, FOMO, TBT)

    Last episode we mastered internet slang and abbreviations but this episode we will become experts on slang specifically for social media.

    Even if you’ve mastered English vocabulary offline, you might find yourself scrolling through Social Media and getting pretty confused. Why do people keep asking me to DM them? Why is everyone hashtagging TBT? Let’s find out why now!

    Ok so our first is the easiest and for an English learner the most useful D-M, meaning direct message or a private message with a person on social media, especially Twitter or Instagram.
    So if you have found a mother tongue or fellow English learner on a group chat you may want to DM to share more conversations and discussions in english.

    Ok number two is selfie S-E-L-F-I-E. This is an english phrase but appears to have permeated the rest of the world. A selfie is a self-portrait, typically taken with a digital camera or smartphone, which may be held in the hand or supported by a selfie stick.

    They are often casual in nature (or made to appear casual). I'm sure all of you have taken one at some point in your life…. even if you don’t want to admit it!

    So for our third, we have FOMO F-O-M-O Fear of Missing Out. It basically symbolizes the feeling of being sad or anxious that something fun is happening without you. For example if you friends are all going on holiday but you have work you may be experiencing FOMO.

    For our last abbreviation today we have T-B-T meaning Throwback Thursday. If you use instagram you may have seen this once before. TBT is a hashtag used to share old pictures that are a "throwback" to the past. People use it when sharing old photos and videos of themselves for nostalgia or if they have found a selfie they took months ago and fancy a slight hit of self esteem.

    So now we nearly have the all social media slang you need at your fingertips….however not all of it! Next episode we will be looking at more social media slang so stay tuned.

    You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 min
    Internet Slang Special - English abbreviations (CBA, TBH, BTW, TMI)

    Internet Slang Special - English abbreviations (CBA, TBH, BTW, TMI)

    Today we will be exploring essential internet abbreviations.

    The more time you spend learning English, the more time you’ll spend reading and writing English on the internet. I know as a language learner this can be exciting but also very frustrating!

    You may be familiar with L-O-L (laugh out loud) or O-M-G (oh my god). But there are many more us brits use that are slightly less obvious.

    So to start, we will discuss an abbreviation used to decline or refuse offers. I use many of these frequently, the most being C-B-A meaning I can’t be asked, which means I do not want to because I do not have the energy or desire.

    It can be used as so if my friend asks me to go out for dinner late on a cold January evening I will often reply CBA, in short meaning no.

    Ok my second most used internet abbreviation is T-B-H translating to to be honest. A way of signifying you are about to tell the truth. It does not really add anything to a conversation but many people use it when they feel like what they’re about to say is extra honest, something they really believe, or something they’ve thought about thoroughly before saying.

    We could use it like this "TBH I don’t want to go to the party as I do not like the host." meaning if I am honest I don’t like the host of the party so I will not be attending.

    Ok number three, B-T-W... no I am not talking about a fake version of a BMW! BTW translates to By the Way. A way of introducing a new topic into conversation.

    For example I could text my flatmate "I will be back at four, BTW you need to go shopping as there is no food at home".

    Ok so on to our last abbreviation. T-M-I translating to "Too much information". A way of saying that something contains too many intimate details. For example if my brother is sick and starts describing how many times he has vomited today I may respond "TMI Joe, I know you are sick and don’t need to know everything".

    So they are our phrases of the day! Maybe now you can decode what your British friends are talking about!

    Don’t want to leave your bed?! Tell them: TBH I CBA to go to that party! Let them know!

    You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 min

Recensioni dei clienti

-A-L-3-X- ,

Great learning podcast!

I really enjoying learning British slangs, so I can finally understand my British friends! Well done Louisa! 👏 And thank you 🙏

mandolean ,

Super useful

It’s a nice and fresh addition to my English learning course. Plus I love the host voice!

mirkofabriano ,

This is terrific

This is so peng! Next time i’ll go to London i will use all the words that i learned here!

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