172 episodi

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper

    • Arti visive
    • 5.0 • 3 valutazioni

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Let loose after lockdown: London’s best gallery shows

    Let loose after lockdown: London’s best gallery shows

    This week: after four long months, commercial art galleries are open again in England. We discuss some of the London shows with Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and take a tour of Rachel Whiteread’s exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery in Grosvenor Hill, London. And we talk to the artist Idris Khan, who has a new exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery, about his oil, watercolour and collage works made in the English countryside and using sheet music from Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. And in this episode’s Work of the Week we talk to the artist James Welling, whose latest photographic projects stem from direct encounters with ancient Greek objects, about Kore 674, an ancient Greek sculpture from 500 BCE in the Acropolis Museum, Athens.
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    • 1h
    Can Netflix help solve the Isabella Stewart Gardner art heist?

    Can Netflix help solve the Isabella Stewart Gardner art heist?

    On this week's podcast: the world’s greatest art heist. As a new Netflix documentary hits our screens, who stole the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Manet, among other items, and are we any closer to finding them? We talk to Jeff Siegel, producer of the new Netflix series This is a Robbery about the 1990 heist at the Gardner museum, in Boston, Massachusetts. As Denmark brings in the "coronapas", a form of vaccine passport, we talk to Axel Rüger of the Royal Academy of Arts in London about whether such a scheme could work in the UK's museums and galleries, and to Tania Coen-Uzzielli of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art in Israel, where they have a “green pass” scheme, from which museums are exempt. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Susan Foister, deputy director of the National Gallery in London, discusses Jan Gossaert’s Adoration of the Kings—the subject of a show at the gallery which has now been developed into an experience for smartphone users.
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    • 1h 13 min
    Has the drop in visitors changed museums forever?

    Has the drop in visitors changed museums forever?

    The Art Newspaper’s annual survey of museum attendance is out: just how many visitors and how much money have museums lost in the pandemic? And how have digital initiatives helped?
    José da Silva, exhibitions editor at The Art Newspaper, and one of the editors of our annual visitor figures survey, talks about the 77% global fall in visitor numbers and the huge losses in self-generated income in museums. And we talk to Chris Unitt, the founder of One Further, a digital consultancy for the arts industry, about museums’ work in the digital field, how effective it has been and how it might be used in the future.
    And, in excerpts from our sister podcast, A brush with... we hear Michael Armitage and Julie Mehretu discussing Titian and Velázquez.

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    • 58 min
    Benin bronzes: looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

    Benin bronzes: looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last

    This week: Germany announces that its museums will send the Benin bronzes back to Nigeria: will other nations follow? We talk to Catherine Hickley, who broke the story of Germany’s planned restitution of the bronzes in The Art Newspaper this week, and to Dan Hicks, whose book The Brutish Museums tells the story of British colonial destruction and looting that led to the bronzes’ collection by museums across the world. Also: a Van Gogh painting which had never been exhibited has just been sold at auction. We ask The Art Newspaper’s Martin Bailey about the painting and discuss his latest Van Gogh blog, about the tragic lives of Vincent’s sisters. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Rana Begum talks about Always Now (1981), by the painter Tess Jaray.
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    • 56 min
    The results are in: the real impact of Covid on the art market

    The results are in: the real impact of Covid on the art market

    On this week's podcast: the most influential annual art market report has just been published—so what does it tell us about the effects of a year of Covid-19 on the market? We talk to Clare McAndrew, the author of the The Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report.
    Also in this episode, we talk to the scholar of Dada and Surrealism, Dawn Ades, about her book on Marcel Duchamp—and we address the debate about who made Fountain (1917), the famous upturned urinal. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Jakob Fenger, a member of Danish artist collective Superflex, discusses a work by the Brazilian artist Cildo Meireles, Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project (1970).

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    • 1h 5 min
    UK culture war: how should museums confront colonialism?

    UK culture war: how should museums confront colonialism?

    This week, we focus on two books: Aimee Dawson talks to Alice Procter about the debate over contested heritage in the UK and her book The Whole Picture, a strident call for colonial histories to be told in museums. Jori Finkel speaks to Glenn Adamson about Craft: An American History, a radical reappraisal of craft's role in forging American identity. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Ben Luke talks to the critic Michael Peppiatt—curator of an exhibition uniting Frank Auerbach and Tony Bevan at Ben Brown Fine Arts in London—about Auerbach's EOW Sleeping IV (1967), in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.
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    • 1h 8 min

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