63 episodi

This podcast might not actually kill you, but it covers so many things that can. Each episode tackles a different disease, from its history, to its biology, and finally, how scared you need to be. Ecologists and epidemiologists Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke make infectious diseases acceptable fodder for dinner party conversation and provide the perfect cocktail recipe to match

This Podcast Will Kill You Exactly Right

    • Scienze biologiche
    • 5.0, 6 valutazioni

This podcast might not actually kill you, but it covers so many things that can. Each episode tackles a different disease, from its history, to its biology, and finally, how scared you need to be. Ecologists and epidemiologists Erin Welsh and Erin Allmann Updyke make infectious diseases acceptable fodder for dinner party conversation and provide the perfect cocktail recipe to match

    Ep 50 Antibiotics: We owe it all to chemistry!

    Ep 50 Antibiotics: We owe it all to chemistry!

    Fifty episodes. That’s fifty (sometimes) deadly viruses, bacteria, protozoa, parasites, and poisons. And don’t forget the fifty quarantinis to accompany each! What better way to celebrate this momentous occasion than talking about something that may actually save you: antibiotics. In this, our golden anniversary episode, our ambition tempts us to tackle the massive world of these bacteria-fighting drugs. We explore the various ways that antibiotics duel with their bacterial enemies to deliver us from infection, and we trace their history, from the early years of Fleming and Florey to the drama-laden labs of some soil microbiologists. Finally, we end, as we always do, with discussing where we stand with antibiotics today. Dr. Jonathan Stokes (@ItsJonStokes), postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Jim Collins’ lab at MIT, joins us to talk about some of his lab’s amazing research on using machine learning to discover new antibiotics, which prompts us to repeat “that is SO COOL” and “we are truly living in the future.” We think you’ll agree.

     

    To read more about using machine learning to uncover antibiotic compounds, head to the Collins’ lab website, the Audacious Project site, or check out Dr. Stokes’ paper: 

    Stokes, Jonathan M., et al. "A deep learning approach to antibiotic discovery." Cell 180.4 (2020): 688-702.

    • 1h 59 min
    COVID-19 Ch 11: Modeling

    COVID-19 Ch 11: Modeling

    The eleventh episode of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series has arrived, and just in time. Have you found yourself trying to sift through headlines claiming “this model predicts that” and “that model predicts this”, but you’re not sure where the truth really lies? Then this episode is for you. With the help of Dr. Mike Famulare from the Institute for Disease Modeling (interview recorded April 29, 2020), we walk through the basics of mathematical modeling of infectious disease, explore some of the current projections for this pandemic, and discuss some guidelines for evaluating these headline-making models. As always, we wrap up the episode by discussing the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we’ve listed the questions below:
    What is a math model and what are some of the goals of mathematical modeling?
    So talking specifically now about infectious disease models, can you walk us through what the basic components are of an infectious disease model, like an SIR model?
    Where do you get the data that you use to estimate the parameters in an SIR model - what is based on actual data and what has to be estimated?
    Infectious disease outbreaks often have a curve-like shape, with the number of infected individuals on the y-axis and time on the x-axis. Can you explain why infectious disease epidemics tend to follow a curve?
    Can you talk us through some of the assumptions that you have to make when you're constructing one of these models and how that kind of relates to the uncertainty inherent within models? How might that uncertainty affect interpretation?
    What are some examples of the various ways we use infectious disease models in public health policy? Can you talk about how models might be used at various stages of a pandemic to guide public health measures? How might our use of models early on in a pandemic be different from the middle of one?
    Speaking specifically about COVID-19 now, can you talk about what a basic model for this pandemic might look like? 
    Are models for COVID-19 using only lab-confirmed cases of the disease or clinical-confirmed cases as well?
    Looking back on these earlier models of COVID-19, what can we take away from the performance of these models?
    Is there any agreement among models as to what policies might be the best in terms of keeping cases and deaths as low as possible? 
    For those of us who have no background in mathematical or statistical modeling, are there guidelines that we should use to evaluate these models or compare them? What should we (as in the general public) be taking away from these models?
    Are there any positive changes you hope to see come out of this pandemic, either as a member of the community or as a math modeler?

    For a deeper dive into the wonderful world of infectious disease models, we recommend checking out this recent video from Robin Thompson, PhD of Oxford Mathematics titled “How do mathematicians model infectious disease outbreaks?” The video was posted on April 8, 2020.

     

    • 1h 21 min
    Ep 49 Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Triple EEEk!

    Ep 49 Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Triple EEEk!

    In 2019, eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes, made headlines in much of the US as cases skyrocketed compared to previous years. But why is this disease so feared and even more importantly, why is it on the rise? Those are just a couple of the questions we seek to answer on this week’s episode. From the nitty gritty on what this virus does to your body to centuries-long forest dynamics in Massachusetts, we connect the disease ecology dots of EEE. We promise, the biology and history of eastern equine encephalitis is much more exciting than its etymology.

    • 1h 9 min
    COVID-19 Chapter 10: Schools

    COVID-19 Chapter 10: Schools

    In the tenth episode of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series on COVID-19, we continue our exploration of the diverse impacts of this pandemic by taking a look at how education and schooling has been affected, with a particular focus on the United States. Massive school closures and transition to distance learning has revealed vast inequities in access to basic educational needs and has highlighted the importance of public schools as more than just a place to learn. We are joined by journalist Jennifer Berkshire (Twitter: @BisforBerkshire) and education historian Dr. Jack Schneider (Twitter: @Edu_Historian), producers of Have You Heard, a podcast on educational policy and politics, to examine the current challenges in delivering educational content during this pandemic and some implications for the future of public schools (interview recorded April 17, 2020). As always, we wrap up the episode by discussing the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we’ve listed the questions below:
    Have we seen anything like this before, like with the 1918 influenza pandemic and school closures due to polio epidemics?
    What are some of the services that public schools in the US provide? And how is this pandemic revealing that schools are more than just a place to learn? 
    Can you talk briefly about the inequalities in education and access and their historical roots?
    Are these inequalities unique to the United States or are there other countries where similar inequalities are seen or being revealed by this pandemic?
    Who is being left out in this switch to distance learning?  
    Can you discuss how well distance learning works across different age groups?
    Do you think that this epidemic will make policymakers and politicians see the economic value of schools? Or is it going to further decrease funding to schools and result in the dismantling of the public school system? How do you think our definition of school will change after this pandemic?
    What was the trajectory of funding for public schools before this pandemic?
    How well does distance learning seem to work? 
    When schools re-open, what kind of effects are we going to see on current students? Specifically, how do we recover when some kids will have continued to learn during this pandemic and others will likely have fallen further behind? 
    What positive changes do you hope to see come out of this?

    • 1h 6 min
    COVID-19 Chapter 9: Economics

    COVID-19 Chapter 9: Economics

    Episode 9 of our Anatomy of a Pandemic is here, and this week we’re stepping outside our public health sphere to examine COVID-19 from an entirely different perspective, that of an economist. Pandemics don’t happen in a vacuum, and the ripples of their impact extend far beyond those of public health, as nearly every person can attest to today. We’ve seen headlines about a global recession and high rates of unemployment, but what do those things actually mean? Have we seen something like this before or is this uncharted territory? And most importantly, what can we expect? We were curious to know the answers to these questions but we lack the expertise to take them on ourselves, so we asked economist Martha Gimbel, Manager of Economic Research at Schmidt Futures to join us on this episode about the economic impacts of COVID-19 (interview recorded April 14, 2020). A caveat: this episode focuses mostly on the economic impact of the pandemic in the US. As per usual, we wrap up the episode by discussing the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we’ve listed the questions below:
    What are some of the indicators that we use to know how the economy is performing, and what were the trends we were seeing in the months before this pandemic hit?
    Could you take us through a timeline of the economic impact, starting with the first signs that the pandemic was having an impact on the global economy? What industries felt the pandemic first, and where do we stand now?
    Could you break down the impact that we’re seeing on the global economy, the US economy, large corporations, small businesses, and the average consumer?
    Was there a global recession after the 1918 influenza pandemic? If not, what makes these current circumstances unique?
    Which countries or industries are the most vulnerable and why?
    Are certain countries or industries proving to be more resilient in the face of this global recession?
    Can you talk about the gig economy here and how our reliance on low-paid workers with no protection from their employers has impacted our own economic resilience?
    Can you talk about the implications of the numbers of unemployment insurance filings that we’re seeing and just how staggering they are?
    Are the current benefits offered through the unemployment system going to be enough to keep people at home and not seeking work in situations that put them at higher risks of exposure?
    Are there any general trends or predictions in terms of how long this recession will continue and what it will take to recover? How will we know when we have “recovered”?
    Are you seeing any innovative solutions that people are proposing or starting to implement in terms of a social safety net?
    What positive changes do you hope this pandemic will bring about?
    Where is the money for the stimulus checks coming from?
    Is that $1200 check going to be enough to keep people going for the next few months?

    • 1h 9 min
    Ep 48 Botulism: Why are you the way you are?

    Ep 48 Botulism: Why are you the way you are?

    You don’t look surprised to see this in your podcast feed - or is that just the botox? This week we’re taking a tour of the wonderful world of Clostridium botulinum and the toxin it produces, at once both poison and prescription. First, we delve into how botulinum toxin acts to paralyze your muscles and under what circumstances you might encounter it. Then we iron out the wrinkles of the why of botulinum toxin, an answer that involves migratory birds, maggots, and marshes. The story continues with blood sausages, an unfortunate funeral party, and a massive shift from toxin to treatment as the therapeutic potential of botulinum toxin is explored. And the best part of this episode? Georgia. Hardstark. You’ve heard the always amazing, ever hilarious, and one of our personal heroes Georgia Hardstark on My Favorite Murder, but now listen to her share her firsthand experience with getting botox facial injections. This episode ranks among our top favorites we've ever recorded, and we hope you love it as much as we do!

    • 1h 27 min

Recensioni dei clienti

5.0 su 5
6 valutazioni

6 valutazioni

QueenMargot97 ,

Amazing!

From an italian med student, I love this podcast!

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