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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • 今日のニュース

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Swing Issue That Could Win a Swing State

    The Swing Issue That Could Win a Swing State

    Three Rust Belt swing states are critical to winning the presidency this year — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, there is one issue that could be decisive: fracking natural gas.

    Opposition to fracking could be fatal for a candidate in the state, yet front-runners for the Democratic nomination have committed to banning fracking nationwide if elected. We went to western Pennsylvania, where fracking affects residents daily, to see whether electability in the state could really be reduced to this single issue.

    Guests: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times, traveled to Pennsylvania with Andy Mills and Monika Evstatieva, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Our investigative team revealed how immense amounts of methane, the primary gas acquired by fracking, are escaping from oil and gas sites nationwide, worsening global warming.What is fracking? And why is it so harmful to the communities that come in contact with the toxins it leaves behind?

    • 31分
    Harry and Meghan. (And Why Their Saga Matters.)

    Harry and Meghan. (And Why Their Saga Matters.)

    In a moment of national insecurity, with the future of the United Kingdom seemingly hanging in the balance, a new royal couple offered the vision of a unified, progressive future. But the same forces that pushed for Britain to leave the European Union have now pushed Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, to leave the country.

    Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: A wish to carve out more “progressive” roles has led to the loss of perks, privileges and titles — a more thorough break than the Duke and Duchess of Sussex seem to have expected.The couple’s push for greater independence has resurfaced the same questions that animated the Brexit debate.Black Britons expressed support for Harry and Meghan. “Thank God they are free,” one Londoner said. “All of this is about her race. I know it because as a Caribbean woman who did not grow up here, I have experienced it myself.”

    • 27分
    The Latest: ‘Let Us Begin’

    The Latest: ‘Let Us Begin’

    Opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial are underway. For House impeachment managers, that means an opportunity to formally make their case, uninterrupted, for three straight days. For President Trump’s lawyers and Republican allies, that means three straight days of sitting in the Senate chamber, bound by a vow of silence.

    “The Latest” is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.

    • 5分
    The Moderates’ Impeachment Moment

    The Moderates’ Impeachment Moment

    After nearly 12 hours of vicious debate, the Senate voted early Wednesday to adopt the rules that will govern the rest of the impeachment trial. But in a Republican-controlled chamber, why weren’t they the rules that Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, had originally wanted?

    Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

    Background reading: Voting along party lines, Senate Republicans blocked Democrats’ efforts to subpoena witnesses and documents related to President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine.As the trial began in earnest, Mr. Trump was 4,000 miles away, touting the United States’ economic growth at the World Economic Forum, an elite gathering of business leaders in Davos, Switzerland.

    • 23分
    Lessons From the Last Impeachment Trial

    Lessons From the Last Impeachment Trial

    As President Trump’s impeachment trial resumes this afternoon, we look back two decades to a time when Google was in its infancy, Y2K was stoking anxiety and partisanship in Congress was not quite so entrenched. That year, 1999, was the last time the Senate considered whether a president had committed high crimes and misdemeanors. So what has changed since the Senate trial of President Bill Clinton, and why is this impeachment such a different story?

    Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

    Background reading: Four journalists at The Times tell their stories of covering the last impeachment trial.Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, announced rules to try to implement a speedy trial. Here’s how the framework differs from the Clinton precedent.

    • 35分
    Bernie's Big Bet

    Bernie's Big Bet

    The Obama coalition has become almost mythic within the Democratic Party for having united first-time voters, people of color and moderates to win the presidency in 2008. This year, Senator Bernie Sanders is betting that he can win with the support of young voters and people of color — but without the moderates.

    To do that, he’s counting on winning over and energizing the Latino vote. The ultimate test of whether he will be able to do that is in California, where Latinos are the single biggest nonwhite voting bloc. While young Latinos in California overwhelmingly support Mr. Sanders, to become the Democratic nominee, he will need the support of their parents and grandparents as well.

    Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national political correspondent who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The New York Times, traveled to California with Jessica Cheung and Monika Evstatieva, producers on “The Daily,” to speak with Latino voters. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

    Background reading: Though Mr. Sanders is a 78-year-old white senator from Vermont, in California, some Latino supporters are calling him “Tío Bernie,” as if he were an uncle or a family friend.Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren, the two leading progressive candidates, sparred publicly in the last debate.

    • 36分

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imhasanshamim

Love the show

hey..wanted to thank you for the show. love d way you organize and make it simple for people like me

Tina Oliver

Innovative news reporting

A wonderful show that filled a gap between print stories and the audio world. Helps me to understand more when I hear the voices of the refugees, sexual harassment victims and those displaced from homes due to hurricanes and wild fires.

focusdis

Gold standard

Others have stated but this is really the gold standard of podcast intertwined with journalism.

I know many people love bashing the NYT but the episode on opioids with the interview with the addict and police gives you a personal emotional impact lost in print.

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