102 episodes

The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University is a university-wide center that works to advance the understanding of development challenges and offer viable solutions to problems of global poverty.

CID is Harvard’s leading research hub focusing on resolving the dilemmas of public policy associated with generating stable, shared, and sustainable prosperity in developing countries. Our ongoing mission is to apply knowledge to and revolutionize the world of development practice.
WWW.CID.HARVARD.EDU

Harvard Center for International Development Harvard University

    • News

The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University is a university-wide center that works to advance the understanding of development challenges and offer viable solutions to problems of global poverty.

CID is Harvard’s leading research hub focusing on resolving the dilemmas of public policy associated with generating stable, shared, and sustainable prosperity in developing countries. Our ongoing mission is to apply knowledge to and revolutionize the world of development practice.
WWW.CID.HARVARD.EDU

    The Value of Complementary Coworkers

    The Value of Complementary Coworkers

    In today’s world, most workers are highly specialized, but this specialization can come at a cost – especially for those on the wrong team. New research by Growth Lab Research Director Frank Neffke assesses the importance of the skills of coworkers. Finding coworkers who complement and not substitute one’s skills can significantly impact earning potential. The impact is equal to having a college degree. Coworker complementarity also drives careers and supports urban and large plant wage premiums.

    Learn more about this new research on The Value of Complementary Coworkers: https://growthlab.cid.harvard.edu/academic-research/complementarity

    About Frank Neffke: Frank Neffke is the Research Director of the Growth Lab at the Center for International Development. He joined the team in 2012.

    His research focuses on economic transformation and growth, from the macro level of structural change in regional and national economies to the micro level of firm diversification and the career paths of individuals. This research has shed light on topics ranging from structural transformation and new growth paths in regional economies, economic complexity and the role of cities, local labor markets, the importance of division of labor, human capital and teams in modern economies, the consequences of job displacement and the future of work.

    Before joining the CID, Frank worked as an assistant professor at the Erasmus School of Economics in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

    He holds a Ph. D. in Economic Geography from Utrecht University and Master degrees in Econometrics and Philosophy from the University of Amsterdam.

    • 19 min
    A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

    A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

    On this week's Speaker Series podcast, we are joined by Zainab Qureshi, the LEAPS (Learning and Educational Achievement in Pakistan Schools) Senior Program Manager at the Center for International Development’s EPoD (Evidence for Policy Design). Zainab will be speaking about EPoD’s research on alleviating system-level constraints to improve student learning outcomes in Pakistan.

    // Originally recorded on December 6, 2019.

    About the talk:
    School enrollment is up in Pakistan, but student learning outcomes remain vastly sub-standard. At same time, widespread local entrepreneurship has dramatically changed Pakistan's education landscape, with 42% of school-going children now attending low cost private schools. Transformational research by the LEAPS program shows that improving education quality will require moving beyond the traditional approach of input augmentation towards a new, systems-based approach that explores how to catalyze innovation in the entire education ecosystem and help schools help themselves.

    This talk will outline the Learning and Educational Achievement in Pakistan Schools (LEAPS) team’s research on how to alleviate system-level constraints to improve student learning outcomes. Lead researchers on LEAPS are Prof. Tahir Andrabi (Pomona), Prof. Jishnu Das (Georgetown) and Prof. Asim Ijaz Khwaja (Harvard Kennedy School).

    About the Speaker:
    Zainab Qureshi is the LEAPS Senior Program Manager at EPoD, overseeing implementation of Education and policy research in Pakistan. She has previously worked at various organizations across the Education sector in Pakistan, implementing low cost Education delivery programs and developing an alternate model of education for low income schools. She holds a Master’s in Education (Ed.M.) from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA in Economics and International Development from McGill University.

    • 11 min
    Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

    Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

    How important are social constraints and information gaps about the labor market in explaining the low rates of female labor force participation (FLFP) in societies that are undergoing change, but have conservative gender norms? To answer this question, we conducted a field experiment embedded in a survey of female university students at a large public university in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We randomly provided one subset of individuals with information on the labor market and aspirations of their female peers (T1), while another subset was provided with this information along with a prime that made the role of parents and family more salient (T2). We find that expectations of working among those in the Control group are quite high, yet students underestimate the expected labor force attachment of their female peers. We show that information matters: relative to the Control group, expectations about own labor force participation are significantly higher in the T1 group. We find little evidence that dissemination of information was counteracted by local gender norms: impacts for the T2 group are significant and often larger than those for T1 group. These impacts are primarily driven by students who report wanting to share their responses with their parents. However, T2 leads to higher expectations of working in a sector that is more culturally accepted for women (education).

    With Monira Essa Aloud (King Saud University), Sara Al-Rashood (King Saud University), Ina Ganguli (University of Massachusetts Amherst) and Basit Zafar (Arizona State University)

    //Interview originally recorded on 11/8/2019. Ina Ganguli sat down with a CID Student Ambassador to discuss experimental evidence from EPoD sponsored work on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women.

    About the Speaker: Ina Ganguli is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Associate Director of the UMass Computational Social Science Institute (CSSI). Her primary research areas are labor economics and the economics of science and innovation. She holds a PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University, a Masters in Public Policy from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern University. She is a Research Affiliate of the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard University (LISH) and a Research Fellow at the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics (SITE) at the Stockholm School of Economics. In 2018 she received the Russian National Prize in Applied Economics and previously received honorable mention for the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research Dissertation Award. She has been a U.S. Embassy Policy Specialist Fellow in Russia, Azerbaijan and Tajikistan, a Fulbright Scholar in Ukraine, and a Bundestag International Parliamentary Program Fellow in Germany.

    • 15 min
    Venture Capital in Developing Markets

    Venture Capital in Developing Markets

    What does it take to grow entrepreneurial ecosystems in the developing world? The talk will share some lessons from our experience at Alter across 14 markets in SE Asia and Africa. Specifically, the talk will focus on three aspects of early-stage entrepreneurship in such markets: (i) thin capital markets and the implications for early stage companies and ventures; (ii) the demand-supply gaps in the high-skill labor market (and the role of the diaspora); and (iii) the potential for using a network-based sourcing and investment model within small, dense ecosystems.

    // Interview recorded on October 25, 2019.

    In this Speaker Series podcast, CID Student Ambassador Valeria sits down for a discussion with Ozair Ali, co-founder and COO of Alter Global - a network of tech entrepreneurs across emerging cities in the world. Ozair works with entrepreneurs to provide them with access to talent and capital. Ozair has previously worked at the Central Bank of Pakistan and at CID at Harvard University. He holds an MBA from Stanford University and an MPA/ID from Harvard University.

    Podcast edited by Charles Hua '22

    • 16 min
    Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

    Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

    Support for gender equality has increased globally, and studies of this trend usually examine individual- and/or country-level factors. However, this overlooks subnational variation. City-dwellers are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment, leadership, and leisure.

    Alice Evans, lecturer at Kings College London, sat down with Salimah Samji, Director of the Building State Capability program at CID to discuss her investigation into the causes of rural–urban differences through comparative, qualitative research in Cambodia.

    Dr. Alice Evans is a Lecturer at King's College London as well as a Research Associate at CID’s Building State Capacity program. She researches social norms and how they change and is currently writing a book on how societies come to support gender equality.

    Interview originally recorded on October 30, 2018.

    • 16 min
    Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

    Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

    We are at a crossroads in the humanitarian community. Despite global commitments made in 2016 to shift power away from international to local actors to lead during crisis response, little has changed. We know that humanitarian action led by responsible governments in crisis-affected countries, assisted and held accountable by civil society, can more quickly save lives and act more appropriately to meet the needs of local populations. Simply put, governments and civil society in crisis-affected contexts should be leading humanitarian action wherever possible, with international actors assuming a supporting role. How do we get there? Fatema will share examples from recent crises in Mozambique, Indonesia, and the Philippines and explore how we can transform global humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership.

    In this CID Speaker Series podcast, CID student ambassador Mark sits down with Fatema Sumar, VP for Global Programs at Oxfam America to discuss the need for transformation in humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership.

    // Interview recorded on October 11, 2019.

    About the Speaker:
    Fatema Z. Sumar joined Oxfam America in 2018 as Vice President of Global Programs, where she oversees our regional development and humanitarian response programs. Fatema comes to Oxfam with a distinguished career in the U.S. government, leading U.S. efforts to advance sustainable development and economic policy in emerging markets and fragile countries. Most recently, she served as Regional Deputy Vice President for Europe, Asia, Pacific, and Latin America at the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where she managed investments focused on international growth and poverty reduction. Prior to MCC, she served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asia at the U.S. Department of State and as a Senior Professional Staff Member on the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

    Fatema holds a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and a Bachelor of Arts in Government from Cornell University. She studied abroad at the American University in Cairo.

    • 22 min

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