300 episodes

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

The Inquiry BBC

    • News
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

    Should we learn to live with Covid?

    Should we learn to live with Covid?

    As new students start at universities in many countries around the world, governments are grappling with how to contain a second wave of Coronavirus. Already many universities have put lectures online and students are being told to stay in their rooms. But is this fair? Covid-19 is a deadly virus but not so much for the young. Can or should we keep the world locked down until there’s a vaccine or cure? Or, Tanya Beckett asks: should we learn to live with Covid?


    (Students wait to start their entrance exams outside the University of Madrid, Spain. Credit: Eduardo Parra/Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Are shares in Elon Musk’s Tesla vastly overvalued?

    Are shares in Elon Musk’s Tesla vastly overvalued?

    In 2018, the electric car maker, Tesla, was struggling to get the Model 3 electric vehicle off the production line. Its CEO, tech entrepreneur Elon Musk, was working up to 22 hours a day on the factory floor, trying to solve a host of problems on the car he’d bet the company on. It was close to running out of money.

    Two years later, the company’s doing better. It says it will grow 30-40% this year.

    No surprise then that Tesla’s share price has gone up. But the amount may surprise you – up eight fold in the last year, to $400 a share. Making it the most valuable car company in the world.

    It’s now worth more than Toyota, Volkswagen and Honda put together. But yet it still manufactures only a fraction of the cars they make.

    So are shares in Elon Musk’s Tesla vastly overvalued? Sumant Bhatia finds out from our expert witnesses, who include a Tesla owner who’s a shareholder and superfan, a fund manager who thinks the shares are in a bubble, an investor with millions of dollars in Tesla and an expert in electric vehicles.

    • 22 min
    Is Kanye West really running for US president?

    Is Kanye West really running for US president?

    In July, billionaire musician Kanye West announces on Twitter that he’s standing as a candidate in November’s US presidential election. After a scramble to meet the registration deadlines, his name is on the ballot in fewer than 20 states. His manifesto is confusing, his motive unclear.

    In the past, Kanye West has been a vocal supporter of president Donald Trump. And it seems his campaign is being run largely by those with close ties to the Republican party. The Democrats say his entry in the race as an independent third party candidate is a dirty trick by Republicans. Others claim it’s simply a publicity stunt to promote his new album.

    But, in battleground states, where every vote counts, could his celebrity status have a significant impact on the election result?

    How seriously should we take Kanye West’s run for president? Kavita Puri finds out from our expert witnesses, who include professors of African-American studies at US universities, a Washington-based politics reporter and a Democratic pollster and strategist.


    (Kanye West at the 2020 Vanity Fair Oscar Party, Beverly Hills, California. Photo: Rich Fury/Getty Images)

    • 23 min
    Will the US presidential debates change the course of the election?

    Will the US presidential debates change the course of the election?

    On the 29th September the two US presidential candidates Donald Trump and Joe Biden will take part in the first of three 90-minute live televised debates ahead of the presidential election in November.

    Tanya Beckett asks can the debates affect the outcome of the election?



    (Composite image of Joe Biden (Credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters) and Donald Trump (Credit: John G Mabanglo/EPA)

    • 23 min
    Can the world stop online fraud?

    Can the world stop online fraud?

    Online fraud takes many forms, from deceptive e-mails and websites which trick us into paying money to the wrong bank account, to romance scams and malicious software copying our bank and credit card details.

    It's regarded by criminals as a highly lucrative and relatively low risk crime, so why is it so easy for fraudsters to manipulate our personal data and steal our money, what can be done to end online fraud?

    Charmaine Cozier talks to some of those trying to disrupt the scammers and protect the public.

    Guests:
    Rachel Tobac, Ethical Hacker CEO of SocialProof Security
    Muhammad Imran, Criminal Intelligence Officer, Interpol Financial Crimes Unit
    Stéphane Konan, Cyber Security Consultant & African Government Advisor
    Tamlyn Edmonds, Fraud Prosecutor, Edmonds Marshall McMahon


    (Laptop owned by an online romance scammer, Accra, Ghana. Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson / Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Will votes be safe in the US presidential election?

    Will votes be safe in the US presidential election?

    President Trump says opening up November’s election to more postal voting will make it more vulnerable to fraud and election interference. Many more Americans are expected to avoid going in person to polling stations because of the coronavirus pandemic and will rely on postal voting to ensure their voices are heard.

    Tanya Beckett examines President Trump’s claims and how the US postal service will cope with millions of ballots.

    Producer: Sharon Hemans and Diane Richardson

    (A voter drops off a mail-in ballot at a collection box outside Cambridge City Hall, Mass. USA. Credit: Lane Turner / Getty Images)

    • 22 min

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