296 episodes

What you need to know about money each week and what the news means for you, from the UK's best financial website.

This is Money Podcast This is Money

    • Investing

What you need to know about money each week and what the news means for you, from the UK's best financial website.

    Are tax returns too taxing - and could you not know you need to do one?

    Are tax returns too taxing - and could you not know you need to do one?

    Are tax returns too taxing, why did new overdraft rules backfire, are challenger banks biting and what are the cars that hold their value best? We answer these questions on this week’s This is Money podcast. 
    It’s tax return time. The organised will have safely filed their tax returns long ago, but there are still plenty of people who don’t yet feel the last minute has arrived.
    But what if you are meant to fill in a tax return and don’t realise?
    On this week’s podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost discuss the ten reasons that people may have to fill a tax return in, even though they are employees paid through PAYE.
    The team also discuss whether much of the tax return is really needed, or whether people are needlessly spending time filling in an over complicated form for an overly complex system.
    Also on this week’s podcast is the overdraft row that’s blown up on the back of the FCA’s attempt to improve borrowing and bank’s deciding that 39.9 per cent rates sounded about right.
    The team discuss whether the challenger banks are starting to bite and why people are attracted to them.
    The ten cars that should hold their value best are also revealed, from a Dacia to a Bentley.
    But remember that even the best of these will lose you 35 per cent.
    And finally, Simon tells us about the new episode of the Making the Money Work podcast with London 2012 Olympic-medal winning boxer Anthony Ogogo.

    • 51 min
    Making the Money Work: Boxer Anthony Ogogo on what happened after the London Olympics

    Making the Money Work: Boxer Anthony Ogogo on what happened after the London Olympics

    The Making the Money Work podcast talks to Olympic bronze medal winner and former professional boxer Anthony Ogogo about how people fund a boxing career and whether an Olympian makes much money.

    • 26 min
    Has Santander signalled the end of current accounts with benefits?

    Has Santander signalled the end of current accounts with benefits?

    Santander is to cut the rate of interest customers can earn with its 123 current account.
    It will mean one of Britain's most popular accounts will have dropped from a top tier 3 per cent when it launched in 2012 to 1 per cent.
    Why has the high street banking giant done this and could it result in an exodus of people moving? Does it signal the end of current accounts with benefits?
    It is also capping the level of cashback customers can earn while putting a blanket 39.9 per cent overdraft rate in place – following a similar move from its banking rivals.
    Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost take a look at what it means for the current account market, whether there are other – better – accounts to switch to and how it managed to become so popular.
    Also on this week's podcast, we look at the rise of the buy now, pay later form of credit and whether it is another debt trap to watch out for.
    Why have nearly 40,000 people put in retrospective planning applications? And can you really hide a castle behind a haystack…
    Lastly, the love affair with car buyers and SUVs shows no signs of abating – sales continue to grow at a faster rate than any other group.
    We list the five reasons, allegedly, not to snap one up and whether you should consider an alternative.

    • 56 min
    Is this the plan that will finally help savers?

    Is this the plan that will finally help savers?

    Savers had a resoundingly duff deal over the decade that just ended, as they paid the price for the borrowing binge that proceeded it.
    Understandably, many feel somewhat aggrieved – like a moderate drinker who got the hangover that should have gone to the party animal.
    But it’s not just ‘emergency’ low interest rates that turned permanent that delivered the pain, banks and building societies paying little respect to loyal customers and undermining them with rock bottom rates on legacy accounts has also played a major part.
    Now, the financial watchdog has a plan to deal with the so-called loyalty penalty. A standard savings rate across all easy access accounts and Isas, with the ability to offer better rates over limited periods, for example, 12 months.
    When bonus time was up, that standard rate would act a floor to protect savers against the 0.01 per cent-paying accounts of this world.
    Is this a solution to the problem, or just some tinkering that all but mandates bonus accounts and does nothing to tackle saver inertia?
    Simon Lambert, Sarah Davidson and Georgie Frost tackle the plan to improve the savings market on this week’s podcast – and discuss whether this is a wise idea for a new decade or a recipe for more of the same.
    Also, on this week’s podcast, as a decade ends and one begins, we look at the property market: what happened to house prices in the 2010s and how did it compare to the 2000s, 1990s and 1980s, and also what will happen this year and in years to come?
    The team also look ahead to the 11 March Budget and what may crop up for our personal finances, along with the growing population of over-90s and how we look after our nonagenarians properly.
     
     

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Making the Money Work: Kiko Matthews on how you fund rowing the Atlantic

    Making the Money Work: Kiko Matthews on how you fund rowing the Atlantic

    This bonus podcast episode is from This is Money's new special series Making the Money Work, in partnership with the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. Andi Peters and Simon Lambert talk to record-breaking Atlantic solo rower Kiko Matthews.

    • 28 min
    The biggest financial stories of 2019

    The biggest financial stories of 2019

    Does Woodford trump Brexit and the election, were you more concerned about the wealth gap, or do all those pale into insignificance next to the challenges of climate change?
    On this week’s podcast, Simon Lambert, Georgie Frost and Tanya Jefferies discuss the money stories that shaped the final year of a tumultuous decade.
    Fallen star fund manager Neil Woodford dominated the financial headlines after his fund was frozen at the start of June, with investors still waiting to find out how much they will get back as it is wound down.
    That saga was enough to push Brexit and politics out of the main headlines for a while, but they loomed large over the whole year. 
    January triggered a period of fretting over no deal, March saw the Brexit deadline come and pass, summer saw Theresa May out the door of Number 10 Downing Street and Boris Johnson in, only for the new Prime Minister to miss his own Brexit deadline and gamble on an election that he won handsomely.
    Where does that take us next – and will the set of negotiations we are about to enter into with the EU, after Brexit finally happens on 31 January 2020, prove even tougher.
    The election also brought campaigning on wealth and inequality – and this topic has also never been far from the agenda in 2019, whether it’s the gap between rich and poor or young and old. 
    Should we worry more about it? What is triggering the problem? How much do high house prices have to do with it?
    The team discuss that and the defining global issue of the year: climate change. How will countries stepping up their attempts to reduce carbon emissions shape the next decade – and does it present an investment opportunity?
    We hope you enjoy this final podcast of 2019, thanks for listening, and have a very merry Christmas. We’ll be back in the next decade.

    • 54 min

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