153 episodios

Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.

BSD No‪w‬ Allan Jude

    • Noticias tecnológicas

Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.

    391: i386 tear shedding

    391: i386 tear shedding

    Follow-up about FreeBSD jail advantages, Install Prometheus, Node Exporter and Grafana, Calibrate your touch-screen on OpenBSD, OPNsense 21.1 Marvelous Meerkat Released, NomadBSD 1.4-RC1, Lets all shed a Tear for 386, find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes, OpenBSD KDE Status Report, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Follow-up about FreeBSD jail advantages


    I’ll admit I ran a lot of justifications together into a single paragraph because I wanted to get to configuring the jails themselves. They’re also, by and large, not specific to FreeBSD’s flavour of containerisation, though I still think it’s easily the most elegant implementation. Sometimes the simplest solution really is the best one.




    History of FreeBSD part 4: TCP/IP


    How TCP/IP evolved and BSDs special contribution to the history of the Internet
    ***



    FreeBSD: Install Prometheus, Node Exporter and Grafana


    FreeBSD comes out of the box with three great tools for monitoring. If you need more info about how these tools work, please read the official documentation. I’ll explain the installation only and creating a simple dashboard.





    News Roundup

    Calibrate your touch-screen on OpenBSD


    I didn’t expected it but my refurbished T460s came with a touch-screen. It is recognized by default on OpenBSD and not well calibrated as-is. But that’s really simple to solve.




    Lets all shed a Tear for 386

    FreeBSD is designating i386 as a Tier 2 architecture starting with FreeBSD 13.0. The Project will continue to provide release images, binary updates, and pre-built packages for the 13.x branch. However, i386-specific issues (including SAs) may not be addressed in 13.x. The i386 platform will remain Tier 1 on FreeBSD 11.x and 12.x.





    OPNsense 21.1 Marvelous Meerkat Released


    For more than 6 years, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.




    NomadBSD 1.4-RC1

    We are pleased to present the first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4.





    find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes


    I've been using Unix for long enough that 'find | xargs' is a reflex. When I started and for a long time afterward, xargs was your only choice for efficiently executing a command over a bunch of find results.




    OpenBSD KDE Status Report

    OpenBSD has managed to drop KDE3 and KDE4 in the 6.8 -> 6.9 release cycle. That makes me very happy because it was a big piece of work and long discussions. This of course brings questions: Kde Plasma 5 package missing.
    After half a year of work, I managed to successfully update the Qt5 stack to the last LTS version 5.15.2. On the whole, the most work was updating QtWebengine. What a monster! With my CPU power at home, I can build it 1-2 times a day which makes testing a little bit annoying and time intensive.





    Tarsnap


    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions


    Karl - Firefox webcam audio solution
    Michal - openzfs
    Dave - bufferbloat





    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 38 min
    390: Commercial Unix Killer

    390: Commercial Unix Killer

    Did Linux kill Commercial Unix, three node GlusterFS setup on FreeBSD, OpenBSD on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Nano (1st Gen), NetBSD on EdgeRouter Lite, TLS Mastery first draft done


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Did Linux Kill Commercial Unix?


    Sales of commercial Unix have fallen off a cliff. There has to be something behind this dramatic decline. Has Linux killed its ancestor by becoming a perfectly viable replacement, like an operating system version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers?




    Wireguard: Simple and Secure VPN in FreeBSD


    A great article by Tom Jones about setting up Wireguard on FreeBSD
    ***



    Setup a Three Node Replicated GlusterFS Cluster on FreeBSD


    GlusterFS (GFS) is the open source equivalent to Microsoft's Distributed Filesystem (DFS). It's a service that replicates the contents of a filesystem in real time from one server to another. Clients connect to any server and changes made to a file will replicate automatically. It's similar to something like rsync or syncthing, but much more automatic and transparent. A FreeBSD port has been available since v3.4, and (as of this post) is currently at version 8.0 with 9.0 being released soon.




    News Roundup

    OpenBSD on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Nano (1st Gen)

    Lenovo has finally made a smaller version of its X1 Carbon, something I’ve been looking forward to for years.




    NetBSD on the EdgeRouter Lite

    NetBSD-current now has pre-built octeon bootable images (which will appear in NetBSD 10.0) for the evbmips port, so I decided to finally give it a try. I've been happily running OpenBSD/octeon on my EdgeRouter Lite for a few years now, and have previously published some notes including more detail about the CPU.




    “TLS Mastery” first draft done!




    Beastie Bits


    A Thread on a FreeBSD Desktop for PineBook Pro
    FOSSASIA Conference - March 2021(Virtual)
    WireGuard for pfSense Software
    NetBSD logo to going Moon
    ***
    ###Tarsnap
    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.
    ### Producer's Note
    > Hey everybody, it’s JT here. After our AMA episode where I mentioned I was looking for older BSD Retail Copies, I was contacted by Andrew who hooked me up with a bunch of OpenBSD disks from the 4.x era. So shout out to him, and since that worked so well, I figured I'd give it another shot and ask that if anyone has any old Unixes that will run on an 8088, 8086, or 286 and you're willing to send me copies of the disks. I've recently dug out an old 286 system and I’d love to get a Unix OS on it. I know of Minix, Xenix and Microport, but I haven’t been able to find many versions of them. I've found Microport 1.3.3, and SCO Xenix... but that's about it. Let me know if you happen to have any other versions, or know where I can get them.


    Feedback/Questions


    Christian - ZFS replication and verification
    Iain - progress
    Paul - APU2 device
    ***
    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 55 min
    389: Comfy FreeBSD Jails

    389: Comfy FreeBSD Jails

    A week with Plan 9, Exploring Swap on FreeBSD, how to create a FreeBSD pkg mirror using bastille and poudriere, How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS, Creating Comfy FreeBSD Jails Using Standard Tools, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    A Week With Plan 9


    I spent the first week of 2021 learning an OS called Plan 9 from Bell Labs. This is a fringe Operating System, long abandoned by it’s original authors. It's also responsible for a great deal of inspiration elsewhere. If you’ve used the Go language, /proc, UTF-8 or Docker, you’ve used Plan 9-designed features. This issue dives into Operating System internals and some moderately hard computer science topics. If that sort of thing isn’t your bag you might want to skip ahead. Normal service will resume shortly.




    Exploring Swap on FreeBSD

    On modern Unix-like systems such as FreeBSD, “swapping” refers to the activity of paging out the contents of memory to a disk and then paging it back in on demand. The page-out activity occurs in response to a lack of free memory in the system: the kernel tries to identify pages of memory that probably will not be accessed in the near future, and copies their contents to a disk for safekeeping until they are needed again. When an application attempts to access memory that has been swapped out, it blocks while the kernel fetches that saved memory from the swap disk, and then resumes execution as if nothing had happened.





    News Roundup

    How to create a FreeBSD pkg mirror using bastille and poudriere


    This a short how-to for creating a FreeBSD pkg mirror using BastilleBSD and Poudriere.




    How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS

    How do I install, set up and configure a FreeBSD 12 jail with VNET on ZFS? How can I create FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with /etc/jail.conf to run OpenVPN, Apache, Wireguard and other Internet-facing services securely on my BSD box?
    FreeBSD jail is nothing but operating system-level virtualization that allows partitioning a FreeBSD based Unix server. Such systems have their root user and access rights. Jails can use network subsystem virtualization infrastructure or share an existing network. FreeBSD jails are a powerful way to increase security. Usually, you create jail per services such as an Nginx/Apache webserver with PHP/Perl/Python app, WireGuard/OpeNVPN server, MariaDB/PgSQL server, and more. This page shows how to configure a FreeBSD Jail with vnet and ZFZ on FreeBSD 12.x.




    Creating Comfy FreeBSD Jails Using Standard Tools

    Docker has stormed into software development in recent years. While the concepts behind it are powerful and useful, similar tools have been used in systems for decades. FreeBSD’s jails in one of those tools which build upon even older chroot(2) To put it shortly, with these tools, you can make a safe environment separated from the rest of the system.





    Tarsnap


    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions


    Chris - USB BSD variant
    Jacob - host wifi through a jail
    Jordan - new tool vs updating existing tool
    ***
    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 41 min
    388: Must-have security tool

    388: Must-have security tool

    FreeBSD Q4 2020 Status report, a must-have security tool from OpenBSD, Bastille Port Redirection and Persistence, FreeBSD Wall Display Computer, etymology of command-line tools, GhostBSD 21.01.15 Release Notes, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    FreeBSD quarterly status report for Q4 2020



    Block spammers/abusive IPs with Pf-badhost in OpenBSD. A 'must have' security tool!


    Pf-badhost is a very practical, robust, stable and lightweight security script for network servers.
    It's compatible with BSD based operating systems such as {Open,Free,Net,Dragonfly}BSD and MacOS. It prevents potentially-bad IP addresses that could possibly attack your servers (and waste your bandwidth and fill your logfiles), by blocking all those IPs contacting your server, and therefore it makes your server network/resources lighter and the logs of important services running on your server become simpler, more readable and efficient.







    News Roundup

    Bastille Port Redirection and Persistence


    Bastille supports redirecting (rdr) ports from the host system into target containers. This port redirection is commonly used when running Internet services such as web servers, dns servers, email and many others. Any service you want to make public outside of your cluster will likely require port redirection (with some exceptions, see below).




    FreeBSD Wall Display Computer

    I've recently added a wall mounted 30" monitor for Grafana in my home. I can highly recommend doing the same, especially in a world where more work from home is becoming the norm.




    The etymology of command-line tools



    GhostBSD 21.01.15 Release Notes

    I am happy to announce the availability of the new ISO 21.01.15. This new ISO comes with a clean-up of packages that include removing LibreOffice and Telegram from the default selection. We did this to bring the zfs RW live file systems to run without problem on 4GB of ram machine. We also removed the UFS full disk option from the installer. Users can still use custom partitions to setup UFS partition, but we discourage it. We also fixed the Next button's restriction in the custom partition related to some bug that people reported. We also fix the missing default locale setup and added the default setup for Linux Steam, not to forget this ISO includes kernel, userland and numerous application updates.





    Beastie Bits


    Interview with Brian Kernighan
    ***
    ###Tarsnap
    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.

    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv

    • 49 min
    387: OpenBSD Broadcast Studio

    387: OpenBSD Broadcast Studio

    GNN's tips for surviving Cabin Fever and Coding from Home, Self-host a password manager on OpenBSD, Preliminary OpenBSD Support added to OBS, Dan's CURL tip of the Day, List of some Shell goodies for OpenBSD, and more


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    GNN's tips for surviving Cabin Fever and Coding from Home


    Forgive me if this seems off topic, but I was wondering if you had any advice for the majority of us who are now KFH (koding from home). I don't know how KV works day to day, but it seems pretty clear that the status quo has changed at most workplaces in the last several months, and it's hard to know if there are things we could be doing to stay productive while we're all at home, ordering delivery, and microwaving our mail. Does KV have any good guidance?





    Self-host a password manager on OpenBSD


    I’ve been using Rubywarden to store and access my passwords from OpenBSD workstations and iOS toys. But recent redondant failures from the iOS App and rubywarden not being maintained anymore led to the need for a new solution.
    I was investing on pass+pgp+git but it was quite complex.



    News Roundup

    Preliminary OpenBSD Support added to OBS



    Dan's CURL tip of the Day



    List of some Shell goodies for OpenBSD


    I'm sharing here some practices I'm following and some small tips/tools which facilitate my usage of OpenBSD in my day to day.
    Some are really specific to my usage, others could be re-used.





    Beastie Bits

    • [Traditional text mode games from BSD](https://github.com/msharov/bsd-games)
    • [FreeBSD Easter Eggs](https://twitter.com/freebsdfrau/status/972893680473317377)
    • [A prehistory and history of Unix Slide Deck](https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1BxnFiP_Hv3HJbbYRfSxpTym7GzqxJPQlTE6Ur5h1Al8/edit#slide=id.g951f86c343_0_95)
    • [How to use Android USB Tethering to get Internet on FreeBSD](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cAEmtrEZlV8)
    • [VPN'Othon #2 for CharmBUG](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/charmbug_event.md)




    Tarsnap


    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions

    • [Kev - Ramdisk](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/feedback/kev%20-%20ramdisk.md)
    • [John - new to freebsd](https://github.com/BSDNow/bsdnow.tv/blob/master/episodes/387/feedback/John%20-%20new%20to%20freebsd)





    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 43 min
    386: Aye, 386!

    386: Aye, 386!

    Routing and Firewalling VLANS with FreeBSD, FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS howto, pkgsrc-2020Q4 released, FreeBSD on Raspberry Pi 4 With 4GB of RAM, HardenedBSD December 2020 Status Report, and more


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Routing and Firewalling VLANS with FreeBSD


    In this article we are going to look at and integrate two network isolation technologies, VLANs and VNET. VLANs are common place, and if you have done some network management or design then you are likely to have interacted with them. The second are FreeBSDs VNET virtual network stacks, a powerful network stack isolation technology that gives FreeBSD jails super powers.
    Ethernet VLAN (standardised by IEEE 802.1Q) are an extension to Ethernet and provide an essential method for scaling network deployments. They are used in all environments to enable reuse of common infrastructure by isolating portions of networks from each other. VLANs allow the reuse of common cables, switches and routers to carry completely different networks. It is common to have data that must be separated from different networks carried on common cables until their VLAN tags are finally stripped at a gateway switch or router.





    How to set up FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with ZFS


    How do I install, set up and configure a FreeBSD 12 jail with VNET on ZFS? How can I create FreeBSD 12 VNET jail with /etc/jail.conf to run OpenVPN, Apache, Wireguard and other Internet-facing services securely on my BSD box?
    FreeBSD jail is nothing but operating system-level virtualization that allows partitioning a FreeBSD based Unix server. Such systems have their root user and access rights. Jails can use network subsystem virtualization infrastructure or share an existing network. FreeBSD jails are a powerful way to increase security. Usually, you create jail per services such as an Nginx/Apache webserver with PHP/Perl/Python app, WireGuard/OpeNVPN server, MariaDB/PgSQL server, and more. This page shows how to configure a FreeBSD Jail with vnet and ZFS on FreeBSD 12.x.





    News Roundup

    pkgsrc-2020Q4 released


    The pkgsrc developers are proud to announce the 69th quarterly release
    of pkgsrc, the cross-platform packaging system. pkgsrc is available
    with more than 24,000 packages, running on 23 separate platforms; more
    information on pkgsrc itself is available at https://www.pkgsrc.org/





    FreeBSD ON A Raspberry PI 4 With 4GB of RAM


    This is the story of how I managed to get FreeBSD running on a Raspberry Pi 4 with 4GB of RAM, though I think the setup story is pretty similar for those with 2GB and 8GB.1





    HardenedBSD December 2020 Status Report


    Happy New Year! On this the last day of 2020, I submit December's status report.





    Beastie Bits


    Christmas Cards The Unix Way - with pic and troff
    Fast RPI3 upgrade from source (cross compile)
    ***
    ###Tarsnap
    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions


    Robert - zfs question

    Neb - AMA episode.md

    Joe - puppet






    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 37 min

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