366 episodios

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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    • 5.0 • 8 valoraciones

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    An elegy for Arecibo, and how our environments change our behavior

    An elegy for Arecibo, and how our environments change our behavior

    Science Senior Correspondent Daniel Clery regales host Sarah Crespi with tales about the most important work to come from 57 years of research at the now-defunct Arecibo Observatory and plans for the future of the site.

    Sarah also talks with Toman Barsbai, an associate professor in the school of economics at the University of Bristol, about the influence of ecology on human behavior—can we figure out how many of our behaviors are related to the different environments where we live? Barsbai and colleagues took on this question by comparing behaviors around finding food, reproduction, and social hierarchy in three groups of animals living in the same places: foraging humans, nonhuman mammals, and birds.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

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    • 23 min
    The uncertain future of North America’s ash trees, and organizing robot swarms

    The uncertain future of North America’s ash trees, and organizing robot swarms

    Freelance journalist Gabriel Popkin and host Sarah Crespi discuss what will happen to ash trees in the United States as federal regulators announce dropping quarantine measures meant to control the emerald ash borer—a devastating pest that has killed tens of millions of trees since 2002. Instead of quarantines, the government will use tiny wasps known to kill the invasive beetles in hopes of saving the ash.

    Sarah also talks with Pavel Chvykov, a postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, about the principles for organizing active matter—things like ant bridges, bird flocks, or little swarms of robots.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 23 min
    Areas to watch in 2021, and the living microbes in wildfire smoke

    Areas to watch in 2021, and the living microbes in wildfire smoke

    We kick off our first episode of 2021 by looking at future trends in policy and research with host Meagan Cantwell and several Science news writers. Ann Gibbons talks about upcoming studies that elucidate social ties among ancient humans, Jeffrey Mervis discusses relations between the United States and China, and Paul Voosen gives a rundown of two Mars rover landings.

    In research news, Meagan Cantwell talks with Leda Kobziar, an associate professor of wildland fire science at the University of Idaho, Moscow, about the living component of wildfire smoke—microbes. The bacteria and fungi that hitch a ride on smoke can impact both human health and ecosystems—but Kobziar says much more research is needed.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

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    • 25 min
    Breakthrough of the Year, top online news, and science book highlights

    Breakthrough of the Year, top online news, and science book highlights

    Our last episode of the year is a celebration of science in 2020. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor David Grimm about some of the top online news stories of the year—from how undertaker bees detect the dead to the first board game of death. (It’s not as grim as it sounds.)

    Sarah then talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the Breakthrough of the Year, scientific breakdowns, and some of the runners-up—amazing accomplishments in science achieved in the face of a global pandemic.

    Finally, Book Review Editor Valerie Thompson joins Sarah to discuss highlights from the books section—on topics as varied as eating wild foods to how the materials we make end up shaping us.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 41 min
    Making ecology studies replicable, and a turnaround for the Tasmanian devil

    Making ecology studies replicable, and a turnaround for the Tasmanian devil

    The field of psychology underwent a replication crisis and saw a sea change in scientific and publishing practices, could ecology be next? News Intern Cathleen O’Grady joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the launch of a new society for ecologists looking to make the field more rigorous.

    Sarah also talks with Andrew Storfer, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University, Pullman, about the fate of the Tasmanian devil. Since the end of the last century, these carnivorous marsupials have been decimated by a transmissible facial tumor. Now, it looks like—despite many predictions of extinction—the devils may be turning a corner.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 22 min
    How the new COVID-19 vaccines work, and restoring vision with brain implants

    How the new COVID-19 vaccines work, and restoring vision with brain implants

    Staff Writer Meredith Wadman and host Sarah Crespi discuss what to expect from the two messenger RNA–based vaccines against COVID-19 that have recently released encouraging results from their phase III trials and the short-term side effects some recipients might see on the day of injection.

    Sarah also talks with researcher Xing Chen, a project co-leader and postdoctoral scientist at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, about using brain stimulation to restore vision. Researchers have known for about 70 years that electrical stimulation at certain points in the brain can lead to the appearance of a phosphene—a spot of light that appears not because there’s light there, but because of some other stimulation, like pressing on the eyeball. If electrical stimulation can make a little light appear, how about many lights? Can we think about phosphenes as pixels and draw a picture for the brain? How about a moving picture?

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 21 min

Reseñas de clientes

5.0 de 5
8 valoraciones

8 valoraciones

Granugab ,

Excellent

I enjoy it very much while driving to work in the morning.

EdgarGuevaraCodina ,

Very informative

My weekly source of scientific discoveries, clearly discussed by top science journalists

AzirVaikar ,

Love it

Absolutely love the information discussed on this podcast.

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