155 episodios

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
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The Week in Art The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Artes visuales
    • 5.0 • 1 valoración

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Is the future of museums in Africa?

    Is the future of museums in Africa?

    This week we look at museums and Africa: we explore the future of museums and African institutions’ central role in it and we look at the 19th-century looting of the Benin Bronzes and what it tells us about museums and colonialism, then and now. We talk to Sonia Lawson, the founding director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo, and András Szántó, the writer of the new book The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues. We also speak to Dan Hicks, professor of contemporary archaeology at the University of Oxford and curator at the Pitt Rivers Museum there, about his book The Brutish Museums, focusing on the Benin Bronzes. And for our Work of the Week, Christopher Riopelle of the National Gallery in London talks about a painting of Copernicus by the Polish artist Jan Matejko, which is coming to the National for an exhibition next year.
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    • 1h 15 min
    Rewriting the Thanksgiving myth: the Mayflower and the Wampanoag, 400 years on

    Rewriting the Thanksgiving myth: the Mayflower and the Wampanoag, 400 years on

    It’s Thanksgiving on 26 November, so this week, we look at the myths behind this American holiday, and particularly the story of the Mayflower, the ship that landed in Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts, 400 years ago. We talk to Jo Loosemore, the curator of the exhibition Mayflower 400: Legend and Legacy at The Box in Plymouth, about the voyage, the settlement and decolonising the story. And then we get the in-depth perspective of Steven Peters, the co-founder of the creative agency Smoke Sygnals and a member of the Wompanoag nation, the native inhabitants of the region around Plymouth Colony, who along with other tribes, had lived there for 10,000 years before the Europeans arrived. Steven curated the exhibition Our Story: The Early Days of the Wampanoag Tribe and the Pilgrims Who Followed at the Provincetown Museum in Massachusetts. For this episode’s Work of the Week, the painter Chantal Joffe explores Paula Modersohn-Becker’s Self-Portrait, Age 30, 6th Wedding Day.
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    • 1h
    Where art fairs still happen: the Shanghai buzz

    Where art fairs still happen: the Shanghai buzz

    This week: we speak to our China correspondent Lisa Movius in Shanghai about the fairs and other events opening in the city this week. And we look at a rare museum event opening in Europe: Tate Britain’s Winter Commission, which—because it’s on the facade of the building—opens to the public this week; Louisa Buck meets the latest artist to take on the commission, Chila Kumari Singh Burman. And for this week’s Work of the Week, we focus on Art is… by Lorraine O’Grady, a performance made in 1983 that inspired the video made for the triumphant candidates in the US election, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.
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    • 49 min
    US election: How Trump’s presidency has affected the arts

    US election: How Trump’s presidency has affected the arts

    As the ramifications of the US election are set to continue for weeks, where do we stand in the art world? We look at the economics and the response of artists and art communities over the last four years and into the future. We talk to Felix Salmon, the chief financial correspondent at Axios, about the economic situation and its potential effects; Carolina Miranda of the Los Angeles Times reflects on individualism and collective action in the cultural sphere; and the Mexican artist Pedro Reyes talks about his project in New York City, Mañanaland, timed to coincide with the election. For this week’s Work of the Week, Martin Rowson, a cartoonist for the Guardian and the Daily Mirror, among others, talks about William Hogarth’s Gin Lane (1751), drawing President Trump, and the power of satire to address moments of crisis.


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    • 1h 9 min
    Has coronavirus helped unmask the real prices of art?

    Has coronavirus helped unmask the real prices of art?

    This week: like the rest of the art world, the market has been upended by the pandemic. But has the turmoil forced it to be any more transparent? Do we know any more about the actual price of art? Ben Luke is joined by Georgina Adam, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper and art market specialist, to discuss transparency and the market. Also this week, we talk to David Blayney Brown, the curator of Turner’s Modern World, a new show at Tate Britain in London. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist John Stezaker talks about a grisaille painting, Christ and the Woman Taken in Adultery, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, in the Courtauld collection but currently on display at the National Gallery in London.


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    • 1h 7 min
    The great museum sell-off: should public collections deaccession to survive Covid-19?

    The great museum sell-off: should public collections deaccession to survive Covid-19?

    Following a historic relaxation of deaccessioning laws in the US, we probe the moral quandaries faced by museums forced to sell-off parts of their collections to stay afloat. We speak to Christopher Bedford, the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art in Maryland, which has announced it is to sell three works; to Georgina Adam about what this all means for the art market, and to James H. Duff, a former director of the Brandywine River Museum and chair of the Professional Issues Committee of the Association of Art Museum Directors, for an overview of the history of deaccessioning. Plus, in our latest work of the week, artist Jennifer Packer discusses a Buddhist mural in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
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    • 1h 6 min

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