300 episodes

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

LSE: Public lectures and events London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    Pulling Away? A Social Analysis of Economic 'Elites' in the UK [Audio]

    Pulling Away? A Social Analysis of Economic 'Elites' in the UK [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Professor Lee Elliot Major, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Katharina Hecht | This event will launch a report from a research project at the International Inequalities Institute supported by the Sutton Trust to investigate whether British elites are pulling ahead, not just economically but also socially. Economic research has demonstrated that the richest 1 per cent in terms of income in the UK have increased their relative advantage since the 1980s but we know less about whether their social mobility and self-identities are becoming more exclusive and hence whether there is a more general process of ‘elites pulling away’. Lee Elliot Major (@Lem_Exeter) is Professor of Social Mobility, University of Exeter and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Katharina Hecht is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute (III). Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Engerland! Rossiya! Hyphenated-phantom-limb Nations on the Edges of Europe [Audio]

    Engerland! Rossiya! Hyphenated-phantom-limb Nations on the Edges of Europe [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | How have Britain and Russia dealt with loss of empire and what impact has it had on their self-understanding and politics? Britain and Russia have often been extremely suspicious of each other’s intentions, yet they share some fundamental things in common, beyond an unhealthy preoccupation with secret agents. Some claim that after 60 years Britain has still not adjusted to the post imperial era, and that this is reflected in Brexit - with its inability to accept that Ireland is a separate country, not to mention calls for an ‘Anglosphere’ or Empire 2.0 as an alternative to EU membership. The Russian loss of empire was a much more sudden affair in the early 1990s as 13 states became independent and Russia emerged from the polyglot Soviet carapace. Some claim that Russia is suffering from phantom limb syndrome, with President Putin pillaging the imperial past to create a new Russian identity, which does not mask the failure of his regime to diversify and modernise the Russian economy. The lecture will show how the imperial theme can be used to illumine trends in both societies. Michael Burleigh (@BurlM11) is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIDEAS

    • 1 hr 29 min
    Decolonising African Knowledge Systems [Audio]

    Decolonising African Knowledge Systems [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Professor Akosua Adomako Ampofo, Dr Wangui wa Goro, Dr Romina Istratii, | A crucial conversation with leading thinkers on current attempts to decolonise Eurocentric knowledge systems in Africa, and their role in challenging the enduring effects of colonialism in African and global society. To kick-start 2020’s acclaimed Africa Talks series, we are delighted to host Professor Akosua Adomako Ampofo, Dr Wangui wa Goro and Dr Romina Istratii to discuss decolonisation and African knowledge systems. Across Africa, governments, universities and activist groups are making spirited efforts to decolonise the Eurocentric systems of knowledge that continue to pervade the continent. But what does this mean and how can it be achieved? More than transforming how knowledge is taught and produced in the academy, the ‘decolonisation of African knowledge systems’ can be seen as a tool in a wider toolbox aimed at challenging the incessant sway of colonialism on understanding present-day African society. The speakers will examine some of the progress made in decolonising Africa’s knowledge systems, discussing present ideas on how these systems can be rethought, re-framed and reconstructed, and the complicated role played by global North-South knowledge exchange programmes in attempts to further the continent’s epistemological agency.

    • 1 hr 42 min
    How Change Happens [Audio]

    How Change Happens [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Professor Cass R. Sunstein | How does social change happen? Why is it so hard to anticipate? A key reason is the existence of hidden preferences, which may or may not be unleashed. Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. His latest book is How Change Happens. To pre-order a copy of How Change Happens, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to How Change Happens. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHowChangeHappens This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at How Change Happens. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

    • 1 hr 24 min
    Climate Litigation: achievements and challenges [Audio]

    Climate Litigation: achievements and challenges [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Professor Randall Abate, Dr Emily Barritt, Tessa Khan, Professor Hari Osofsky, Professor Jaqueline Peel, Dr Joana Setzer, Megan Bowman | Climate change litigation continues to expand across jurisdictions as a tool to strengthen climate action. But are courts prepared to protect the rights of future generations, wildlife and natural resources – collectively referred to as “the voiceless” - from the impacts of global climate change? This panel brings together leading scholars and practitioners in the field of climate litigation to discuss the potential and challenges for the law in addressing climate change. Randall Abate is Professor in the Department of Political Science and Sociology, Monmouth University. Emily Barritt (@emilymbarritt) is Lecturer in Tort Law and the Co-Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Kings College London. Megan Bowman is Associate Professor in Law, King’s College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law. Tessa Khan is a lawyer with the Urgenda Foundation and co-founder of the Climate Litigation Network. Hari Osofsky (@HariOsofsky) is Dean of Penn State Law and the Penn State School of International Affairs. Jaqueline Peel is Professor of Law, University of Melbourne. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Research Fellow, Grantham Research Institute, LSE. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Old Friends, New Beginnings: building another future for the EU-UK partnership [Audio]

    Old Friends, New Beginnings: building another future for the EU-UK partnership [Audio]

    Speaker(s): Dr Ursula von der Leyen | Join us for a lecture by Ursula von der Leyen, LSE alumna and President of the European Commission. Prior to her current position she was Germany's Minister of Defence, a position she held from 2013-19. Before she was appointed Minister of Defence, she served as Federal Minister of Labor and Social Affairs since November 2009. From 2005 to 2009, she was Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth. Dr von der Leyen (@vonderleyen) studied at Göttingen and Münster, Hanover Medical School and the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.

    • 51 min

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