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Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!

*See our new math and science youtube show called "Turing Rabbit Holes" at youtube.com/turingrabbitholespodcast ! The Breaking Math Podcast team has teamed up with Particle Physicist and Science Fiction Author Dr. Alex Alaniz to deliver a show about science and society. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

Breaking Math Podcast Breaking Math Podcast

    • Wetenschap

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!

*See our new math and science youtube show called "Turing Rabbit Holes" at youtube.com/turingrabbitholespodcast ! The Breaking Math Podcast team has teamed up with Particle Physicist and Science Fiction Author Dr. Alex Alaniz to deliver a show about science and society. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    RR38: The Great Stratagem Heist (Game Theory: Iterated Elimination of Dominated Strategies)

    RR38: The Great Stratagem Heist (Game Theory: Iterated Elimination of Dominated Strategies)

    This is a rerun of one of our favorite episodes while we change our studio around.

    Game theory is all about decision-making and how it is impacted by choice of strategy, and a strategy is a decision that is influenced not only by the choice of the decision-maker, but one or more similar decision makers. This episode will give an idea of the type of problem-solving that is used in game theory. So what is strict dominance? How can it help us solve some games? And why are The Obnoxious Seven wanted by the police?

    Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.or

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Diane Baca]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 33 min.
    61: Look at this Graph! (Graph Theory)

    61: Look at this Graph! (Graph Theory)

    In mathematics, nature is a constant driving inspiration; mathematicians are part of nature, so this is natural. A huge part of nature is the idea of things like networks. These are represented by mathematical objects called 'graphs'. Graphs allow us to describe a huge variety of things, such as: the food chain, lineage, plumbing networks, electrical grids, and even friendships. So where did this concept come from? What tools can we use to analyze graphs? And how can you use graph theory to minimize highway tolls? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.

    Episode distributed under an Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 30 min.
    P9: Give or Take (Back-of-the-Envelope Estimates / Fermi Problems)

    P9: Give or Take (Back-of-the-Envelope Estimates / Fermi Problems)

    How many piano tuners are there in New York City? How much cheese is there in Delaware? And how can you find out? All of this and more on this problem-episode of Breaking Math.

    This episode distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike-Noncommercial 4.0 International License. For more information, visit creativecommons.org

    Featuring theme song and outro by Elliot Smith of Albuquerque.


    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 31 min.
    60: HAMILTON! [But Not the Musical] (Quaternions)

    60: HAMILTON! [But Not the Musical] (Quaternions)

    i^2 = j^2 = k^2 = ijk = -1. This deceptively simple formula, discovered by Irish mathematician William Rowan Hamilton in 1843, led to a revolution in the way 19th century mathematicians and scientists thought about vectors and rotation. This formula, which extends the complex numbers, allows us to talk about certain three-dimensional problems with more ease. So what are quaternions? Where are they still used? And what is inscribed on Broom Bridge? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.

    This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org.

    The theme for this episode was written by Elliot Smith.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 29 min.
    59: A Good Source of Fibers (Fiber Bundles)

    59: A Good Source of Fibers (Fiber Bundles)

    Mathematics is full of all sorts of objects that can be difficult to comprehend. For example, if we take a slip of paper and glue it to itself, we can get a ring. If we turn it a half turn before gluing it to itself, we get what's called a Möbius strip, which has only one side twice the length of the paper. If we glue the edges of the Möbius strip to each other, and make a tube, you'll run into trouble in three dimensions, because the object that this would make is called a Klein flask, and can only exist in four dimensions. So what is a fiber? What can fiber bundles teach us about higher dimensional objects?



    All of this, and more, on this episode of Breaking Math.



    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 47 min.
    58: Bringing Curvy Back (Gaussian Curvature)

    58: Bringing Curvy Back (Gaussian Curvature)

    In introductory geometry classes, many of the objects dealt with can be considered 'elementary' in nature; things like tetrahedrons, spheres, cylinders, planes, triangles, lines, and other such concepts are common in these classes. However, we often have the need to describe more complex objects. These objects can often be quite organic, or even abstract in shape, and include things like spirals, flowery shapes, and other curved surfaces. These are often described better by differential geometry as opposed to the more elementary classical geometry. One helpful metric in describing these objects is how they are curved around a certain point. So how is curvature defined mathematically? What is the difference between negative and positive curvature? And what can Gauss' Theorema Egregium teach us about eating pizza?

    This episode distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For more information, go to creativecommons.org

    Visit our sponsor today at Brilliant.org/BreakingMath for 20% off their annual membership! Learn hands-on with Brilliant.

    [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Meryl Flaherty]


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    This episode is sponsored by
    · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

    Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

    • 45 min.

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