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Hosted by Molly Wood, “Marketplace Tech” demystifies the digital economy. The daily radio show and podcast uncovers how tech influences our lives in unexpected ways and provides context for listeners who care about the impact of tech, business and the digital world. Transforming breaking news to breaking ideas, Marketplace Tech uncovers themes that transcend the hype in an industry that’s constantly changing. Reporting from Oakland, California host Molly Wood asks smart questions that connect the dots and provide insight on the impact of technology to help listeners understand the business behind the technology rewiring our lives.
Molly has spent two decades covering the tech industry on all platforms and is known as a pioneer in podcasting. She is an IDEAS contributor at Wired and  has been recognized for her dynamic reporting by the Webbys, the National Magazine Awards, and is a Gracie Award winner. Prior to joining Marketplace, she was a tech columnist at The New York Times and before that an executive editor at CNET. The Marketplace Tech daily news podcast is available worldwide on platforms including Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.

Marketplace Tech American Public Media

    • Technisch nieuws

Hosted by Molly Wood, “Marketplace Tech” demystifies the digital economy. The daily radio show and podcast uncovers how tech influences our lives in unexpected ways and provides context for listeners who care about the impact of tech, business and the digital world. Transforming breaking news to breaking ideas, Marketplace Tech uncovers themes that transcend the hype in an industry that’s constantly changing. Reporting from Oakland, California host Molly Wood asks smart questions that connect the dots and provide insight on the impact of technology to help listeners understand the business behind the technology rewiring our lives.
Molly has spent two decades covering the tech industry on all platforms and is known as a pioneer in podcasting. She is an IDEAS contributor at Wired and  has been recognized for her dynamic reporting by the Webbys, the National Magazine Awards, and is a Gracie Award winner. Prior to joining Marketplace, she was a tech columnist at The New York Times and before that an executive editor at CNET. The Marketplace Tech daily news podcast is available worldwide on platforms including Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.

    It’s official: TikTok’s days in the U.S. are numbered

    It’s official: TikTok’s days in the U.S. are numbered

    Late Thursday, President Trump signed an executive order, banning the social media app TikTok in 45 days. TikTok is owned by the Chinese company ByteDance and the administration says a Chinese company having access to Americans’ data is a national security threat. Trump also put a clock on WeChat, the popular Chinese texting app.  Kimberly Adams speaks with Shira Ovide, who covers technology at The New York Times, and she says this could have implications far beyond social media.

    • 8 min.
    A federal judge mourning her son calls for increased data privacy

    A federal judge mourning her son calls for increased data privacy

    In July, federal Judge Esther Salas was deliberately targeted in her home in New Jersey. A gunman shot and killed her son and gravely wounded her husband. This week, Salas released a statement, speaking about how personal information, like her home address, was available online, making it easy for her attacker to find her. The judge called for better laws to protect the personal information of federal judges and their families, but the internet can make it relatively easy for anyone to track down the address, phone number and other personal details of people online, which can translate into real-life risk. So, what is the law surrounding our personal information online? Kimberly Adams speaks with Carrie Goldberg, a lawyer who leads a victims’ rights firm in New York.

    • 7 min.
    Using startups to improve media diversity

    Using startups to improve media diversity

    With popular attention focused, at least for now, on racial justice, a new initiative wants to put more people of color in newsroom leadership by helping them start their own media companies. Kimberly Adams speaks with Erika Alexander, co-founder and chief creative officer of Color Farm Media. Many will know her as the character Maxine Shaw from the ’90s sitcom “Living Single.” Color Farm Media is partnering with Google to run a boot camp for entrepreneurs who want to launch digital news startups.

    • 8 min.
    Outsourcing election cybersecurity to volunteers

    Outsourcing election cybersecurity to volunteers

    It’s Election Day in a half-dozen states, and another opportunity for election officials to sort out just how to run elections in a pandemic. As roughly 8,000 jurisdictions prepare for November, one concern is cybersecurity and if their systems can withstand any kind of hacking. Some of these folks don’t have the strongest security background, so they need training on setting up things like secure passwords and two-factor authentication. To help, the University of Chicago created a program called Election Cyber Surge to connect election officials with cybersecurity experts. Kimberly Adams speaks with Maya Worman, the executive director of the initiative.

    • 6 min.
    A new hotline helps gamers with harassment and bullying

    A new hotline helps gamers with harassment and bullying

    Video games have become a huge release for lots of people, especially the many who are entering their sixth month of some sort of coronavirus lockdown. Sales of video games are up 26% from a year ago. But online harassment has been a problem in gaming for years, and in June, dozens of women accused streamers — people who broadcast their gaming on Twitch or YouTube — of sexual harassment, abuse or assault. Now, a longtime video game activist is launching a hotline for people who play games or work in the games industry to get support. Molly speaks with Anita Sarkeesian, the executive director of the nonprofit media site Feminist Frequency.

    • 8 min.
    Online learning requires internet access and a device — for teachers, too

    Online learning requires internet access and a device — for teachers, too

    There are new tools to help with online learning, but a recent report from Common Sense Media and Boston Consulting Group found that at least 15 million students in the United States lack either a device or internet access, and 9 million kids lack both. Those disparities are worse in rural communities and Black, Latinx and Native American households. Hundreds of thousands of K-12 teachers also lack hardware or internet access. Molly spoke with Elizabeth Gettelman Galicia, vice president for policy at Common Sense Media.

    • 6 min.

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