31 episodes

The independent-minded book review magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal. Good-humoured, unpretentious and a bit eccentric, it’s more like a well-read friend than a literary magazine.

Come behind the scenes with the staff of Slightly Foxed to learn what makes this unusual literary magazine tick, meet some of its varied friends and contributors, and hear their personal recommendations for favourite and often forgotten books that have helped, haunted, informed or entertained them.

Slightly Foxed Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly

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    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

The independent-minded book review magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal. Good-humoured, unpretentious and a bit eccentric, it’s more like a well-read friend than a literary magazine.

Come behind the scenes with the staff of Slightly Foxed to learn what makes this unusual literary magazine tick, meet some of its varied friends and contributors, and hear their personal recommendations for favourite and often forgotten books that have helped, haunted, informed or entertained them.

    Jim Ede’s Way of Life

    Jim Ede’s Way of Life

    In this twentieth-century story of a quest for beauty, the writer Laura Freeman introduces us to Jim Ede, a man who, in creating Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge, changed the way we look at art. We follow Jim from the trenches of the First World War to Lady Ottoline Morrell’s literary parties in Bloomsbury and a curating job at the Tate. He collected artworks by his friends Ben Nicholson and David Jones, acquired the estate of the sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska and designed a house in Tangiers that became a sanctuary for soldiers. These were stepping stones towards Jim turning derelict slum cottages into a home and gallery, a space for both tea and tours. And, as ever, we share recommendations for reading off the beaten track.Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 45 minutes; 18 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.


    A Way of Life: Kettle’s Yard, Jim Ede is available from the Kettle’s Yard shop

    Ottoline Morrell: Life on the Grand Scale, Miranda Seymour is published in a Faber Finds edition. Second-hand copies are available. (12:59)

    Savage Messiah: A Biography of the Sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, H. S. (Jim) Ede is out of print (14:55)

    David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, Thomas Dilworth (19:40)

    Three Tales, Gustave Flaubert (37:55)

    Lady into Fox, David Garnett (38:53) 

    Indelicacy, Amina Cain (40:26)

    Transient Desires, Donna Leon (42:15)
    Related Slightly Foxed Articles

    Living Art, Mark Haworth-Booth on A Way of Life: Kettle’s Yard, Jim Ede, Issue 42 (28:00)Other Links


    Kettle’s Yard House and Galleries, Cambridge

    Tangier Days: the Edes in Morocco, 1936-52 (22.29)

    Bookshop.org (2:16)

    Heffers Bookshop, Cambridge (33:50)
    With thanks to Kettle’s Yard and Paul Allitt for the photo used for this episode’s cover artwork.

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 45 min
    A Poet’s Haven

    A Poet’s Haven

    The artist Barrie Cooke had fishing in common with Ted Hughes, and mud and art in common with Seamus Heaney. Dr Mark Wormald, a scholar on the life and writings of Ted Hughes, has brought to light an extraordinary haul of poems, letters and drawings documenting a decades-long triangular friendship and a shared love of poetry and nature. He describes the spine-tingling discovery of Barrie’s cardboard box stuffed with correspondence and traces its history, starting with the first supper at Barrie’s Kilkenny home, and then at Jerpoint, also on the River Nore, where the trio forged their friendship, Seamus began Station Island and a poet’s haven flourished. From Ted’s dream of a burning fox man, climbing into Carrowkeel passage tombs and visits from Robert Lowell and Tom Paulin to fishing diaries, pike spoons and a stuffed trout, subsurface treasures are dredged up as our literary sifting takes us off the beaten track.Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 46 minutes; 20 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.


    River, Ted Hughes (6:46)

    Lupercal, Ted Hughes (12:56) 

    Station Island, Seamus Heaney (14:34) 

    On Seamus Heaney, R. F. Foster (15:09) 

    Birthday Letters, Ted Hughes (20:13) 

    Crow, Ted Hughes (20:42) 

    Opened Ground, Seamus Heaney (25:15) 

    The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath And Ted Hughes, Janet Malcolm (39:50) 

    A Celtic Miscellany, selected and translated by Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson (41:38) 

    The Mission House, Carys Davies (43:12) 

    Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath, Heather Clark (45:48)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles


    Through the Looking Glass, Jane Feaver on life at Faber and Faber, Issue 55
    Other Links


    For more information about the Barrie Cooke archive, visit the Cambridge University website 

    Barry Cooke’s portrait of Ted Hughes, National Portrait Gallery (5:50)

    Kilkenney Arts Week (33:47)

    Keats-Shelley House, Rome (37:34)

    The Slightly Foxed Best First Biography Prize 2020 (45:48)

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 46 min
    An Odyssey through the Classics

    An Odyssey through the Classics

    Daisy Dunn, historian and biographer of Catullus and Pliny, sets our scene in ancient Rome and Greece, entertaining the Slightly Foxed team with literature of love and war, satire and myth, and amplifying echoes of the classics through the ages. We begin with Homer’s monsters and memorials of fallen men, then take a tour of the ancient world, from Catullus’ erotic poetry and Lysistrata’s sex strike to the eruption of Vesuvius and Suetonius’ lives of extraordinary emperors. In a more contemporary turn, F. Scott Fitzgerald borrows Gatsby from the Satyricon, and Mary Renault writes historical novels and lovers’ names in wine. And there’s the usual round-up of recommended reading from off the beaten track.Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 39 minutes; 54 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.


    Catullus’ Bedspread: The Life of Rome’s Most Erotic Poet, Daisy Dunn

    In the Shadow of Vesuvius: A Life of Pliny, Daisy Dunn

    The Odyssey, Homer, translated by Emily Wilson (7:57)

    The Iliad, Homer, translated by E. V. Rieu (8:08)

    Homer on Life and Death, Jasper Griffin is out of print (9:02)

    The Silence of the Girls, Pat Barker (11:01)

    Memorial, Alice Oswald (11:42)

    The Last of the Wine, Mary Renault (16:37)

    The Twelve Caesars, Suetonius, translated by Robert Graves (19:07)

    I, Claudius, Robert Graves (21:00) 

    Pompei, Robert Harris (22:15) 

    The Satyricon, Petronius, translated by P. G. Walsh (23:48)

    The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald (24:47)

    Rosemary Sutcliff’s Roman and post-Roman novels, Slightly Foxed Cubs (28:19)

    Candide, Voltaire (34:26)

    When the Lights Go Out, Carys Bray (35:27) 

    The Diary of a Provincial Lady, E. M. Delafield (37:03) 

    The Emperor’s Babe, Bernadine Evaristo (37:40)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles



    How Homer Taught Me to Read, Adrian Thorpe on Homer, Odyssey and Iliad, Issue 30

    Hadrian to the Life, Caroline Chapman on Marguerite Yourcenar, Memoirs of Hadrian, Issue 2 (21:42)

    Scaling Gibbon’s Everest, Richard Crockatt on Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Issue 68

    Travels with the Father of History, Justin Marozzi on Herodotus, Histories, Issue 20

    Brave Old World, Lawrence Sail on Voltaire, Candide, Issue 10 (34:26)

    Other Links


    Daisy Dunn

    The Greek Play, Cambridge (28:27)

    Gladstone’s Library (31:37)

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 39 min
    Dr Wiener’s Library

    Dr Wiener’s Library

    Anthony Wells worked at The Wiener Holocaust Library in London for a decade. In this episode he leads the Slightly Foxed editors into the history of the library, which holds one of the most extensive archives on the Holocaust and the Nazi era. We travel to Germany, Amsterdam, New York and Tel Aviv, but it is people rather than places that the library remembers with its annals of personal stories. Dr Alfred Wiener, a German Jew who fought in the First World War, was one of the first to note the rise of the Nazi Party, and he began to assemble an archive of information in order to undermine their activities. From downfall by documentation in the Nuremberg Trial to a tracing service made up of millions of records, we learn how The Wiener Library ensures that those who disappeared are not forgotten.


    With thanks to The Wiener Library for the image used for this episode’s cover artwork: Member of staff, Mrs Walter at The Wiener Library in 1952Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 37 minutes; 6 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.


    The Ratline, Philippe Sands (11:39)

    An Englishman in Auschwitz, Leon Greenman is out of print (14:25)

    Dinner of Herbs: Village Life in 1960s Turkey, Carla Grissmann (28:00)

    Hope against Hope, Nadezhda Mandelstam (29:42)

    Defying Hitler, Sebastian Haffner (31:04)

    An Officer and a Spy, Robert Harris (33:53)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles



    Comfortable Words, Anthony Wells on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, Issue 36

    174517, David Spiller on Primo Levi, If This Is a Man and The Truce, Issue 43
     Casting Out Fear, Gary Mead on Viktor E. Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning, Issue 50

    The Hunt for Hitler, Adam Sisman on Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Last Days of Hitler, Issue 61

    Other Links

    The Wiener Holocaust Library 

    One Tree Books, Petersfield (23:52)

    The Petersfield Bookshop (24:45)

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 37 min
    A Winter’s Tale

    A Winter’s Tale

    In this seasonal episode, the Slightly Foxed team are guided through a snowstorm of winter writing over twelve centuries by the literary critic and author of Weatherland, Alexandra Harris. The tour takes us from Anglo-Saxon mead halls and monsters to Renaissance bodily humours, then on through cool, translucent Enlightenment weather into the dark cloud of the nineteenth century and beyond. We visit frost-fair carnivals on the frozen Thames with Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, brave the Brontës’ wild moorland, stay steamed up indoors with Jane Austen, sink into Dickens’s pea-soupers and see in the ‘year’s midnight’ with John Donne as we listen to a winter’s tale through literature. Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 43 minutes; 19 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. 

     Weatherland and Romantic Moderns, Alexandra Harris (4:22)

    ‘A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy’s Day’, John Donne (5:02)
     Orlando, Virginia Woolf (6:15)
    ‘The Wanderer’, an Elegy in the Exeter Book (8:50)

    Beowulf, translated by Seamus Heaney (12:07)

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Simon Armitage’s revised edition (13:54)

    The Winter’s Tale and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, William Shakespeare (17:08)

    The Great Frost: Cold Doings in London, Thomas Dekker is out of print (19:36)

    The Diary of John Evelyn (20:41)

    The Seasons, James Thomson (22:00)

    The Task, William Cowper is out of print. Read an extract from Book I: The Sofa (22:52)

    ‘Ode to the West Wind’, Percy Bysshe Shelley (26:16)

    Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë (27:48)

    Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen (29:27)

    Bleak House, Charles Dickens (33:14)
    ‘In Memorium’ in Selected Poems, Alfred, Lord Tennyson (34:31)

    Letters from Iceland, W. H. Auden and Louis MacNeice (36:53)

    Winter, Ali Smith (38:20) 9780241973332

    Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee, Slightly Foxed Edition No. 53 (41:19)
    Related Slightly Foxed Articles


    Cain’s Clan, John Harrison on Beowulf, Issue 13 (12:07)

    Keeping Ahead of the Game, Christopher Rush on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Issue 60 (13:54)

    The Abyss Beyond the Orchard, Alexandra Harris on William Cowper, The Centenary Letters, Issue 53 (22:50)

    No Coward Soul, Christopher Rush on Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, Issue 56 (27:48)

    A Dickens of a Project, Laura Freeman on the works of Charles Dickens, Issue 41 (39:13)
    Other Links

    The London Library (2:18) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 43 min
    A Writer’s Territory

    A Writer’s Territory

    The Scottish nature writer Jim Crumley takes the Slightly Foxed team on a tour of literary landscapes, from the lochs of the Trossachs and the mountainous Cairngorms to Aldo Leopold’s sand county in Wisconsin and Barry Lopez’s Arctic. Together they trace the chain of writers who have influenced Jim, from Robert Burns and Wordsworth to Thoreau and Walt Whitman, and see nature through the eyes of his hero, the great Scottish naturalist and photographer Seton Gordon. They discuss how folklore has demonized the wolf while Jim believes its reintroduction could hugely benefit the ecology of the Scottish landscape. And finally they venture off the beaten track with this month’s wide-ranging reading recommendations.Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 40 minutes; 24 seconds)Books MentionedWe may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information. 


    An Englishman’s Commonplace Book, Roger Hudson (1:14)

    A Boy at the Hogarth Press & A Parcel of Time, Richard Kennedy (6:40)
     Jim Crumley’s Seasonal Quartet: The Nature of Autumn, The Nature of Winter, The Nature of Spring, The Nature of Summer (11:03)

    The Cairngorm Hills of Scotland, The Charm of Skye and Amid Snowy Wastes, Seton Gordon are out print, but some Seton Gordon titles are available from Trieste Publishing (14:11)

    A High and Lonely Place, Jim Crumley (15:49)

    A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold (18:14)

    Arctic Dreams, Barry Lopez (18:43)

    The Last Wolf, Jim Crumley (22:54)

    Highland River, Neil Gunn is currently out of stock at the publisher (31:07)

    Featherhood, Charlie Gilmour (33:28)

    The Silver Dark Sea, Susan Fletcher (35:13)

    A Month in Siena, Hisham Matar (36:12)

    The Hunting Party, Lucy Foley (38:00)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles



    Word from the Wood, Galen O’Hanlon on A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold, Issue 54 (18:14)

    Northern Lights, Penelope Lively on Arctic Dreams, Barry Lopez, Issue 4 (18:43)

    Other Links



    An Englishmans’ Commonplace Book ‘launch party’ at John Sandoe Books (1:19)
     The Art Workers’ Guild (1:54)
     Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park (8:37)
     Saraband, independent publisher (12:20)
     Jim Crumley, The Scots Magazine (31:56)

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach

    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 40 min

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