559 episodes

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Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners
Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors and researchers debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP) stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- HUMINT SIGINT OSINT IMINT GEOINT and more -(STOP)- rumored to be professional education internal communication and public information -(STOP)- entire back catalog available online for free -(STOP)- please investigate this claim with all possible haste -(STOP)- SPY Historian Hammond said to have a Scottish accent -(STOP)- is this a countermeasure or a hearts-and-minds campaign?
(END TELEGRAM)

SpyCast SpyCast

    • History
    • 4.0 • 5 Ratings

TOP SECRET
Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners
Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors and researchers debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP) stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- HUMINT SIGINT OSINT IMINT GEOINT and more -(STOP)- rumored to be professional education internal communication and public information -(STOP)- entire back catalog available online for free -(STOP)- please investigate this claim with all possible haste -(STOP)- SPY Historian Hammond said to have a Scottish accent -(STOP)- is this a countermeasure or a hearts-and-minds campaign?
(END TELEGRAM)

    “Sure, I Can Hack Your Organization” – with Eric Escobar (Part 1 of 2)

    “Sure, I Can Hack Your Organization” – with Eric Escobar (Part 1 of 2)

    Summary  
    Eric Escobar (Twitter; LinkedIn) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss compromising networks and information security. He has a coveted DEFCON Black Badge. 
     
    What You’ll Learn 

    Intelligence 

    What keeps Eric up at night  

    Thinking like an ethical hacker (aka a “penetration tester) 

    Protecting your information (i.e., “Hardening the attack surface”) 

    Plain English explanations of key cyber concepts like “Kill Chains” and “Zero Days” 

    Reflections 

    Having a cool job 

    The information revolution and life in the modern world 

    And much, much more… 


    Episode Notes 
    Eric Escobar commits several thousand felonies on any given day, if he didn’t have permission to do what he was doing. 
    A Principal Security Consultant with SecureWorks, Eric has compromised pretty much everything out there: from healthcare and banking to technology and critical infrastructure, through to amusement parks and next generation military aircraft. 
    “From my perspective, it’s the coolest job in the entire world.” 
    His team consecutively won first place in the Wireless CTF category at DEF CON 23, 24, and 25, snagging a Black Badge along the way. He has a BS and MS in Civil Engineering.  
    And… 
    The links between computing, hacking and the 60’s counterculture are FASCINATING. Learn more by dipping your toes here and here, or dive deeper with What the Dormouse Said (2005) by John Markoff and From Counterculture to Cyberculture (2006) by Fred Turner.   
     
    Quote of the Week 
    "Watching any critical infrastructure get compromised is really the thing that keeps me up at night because lives are in the balance…and we do a lot of testing for critical infrastructure, and I've seen computers and machines that have been online and not been taken offline, longer than I've been alive…So really interesting to see those types of things because they interact with really big, expensive hardware…there's a catch 22 that happens where you can't really take the machine offline to do maintenance on it because it's critical infrastructure. So then how do you test it to make sure that a hacker can't take it offline, or maintenance can't be done on it? " – Eric Escobar.
     

    Resources 

    *Andrew’s Recommendation* 


    Word Notes  

    From beginner thru advanced, you’ll find some helpful definitions of things like “Web 3.0,” “NFT’s” and “Digital Transformation” on this Cyberwire audio glossary. 

    *SpyCasts* 


    Inside Microsoft’s Threat Intelligence Center (MSTIC) – with John Lambert and Cristin Goodwin (2021) 


    The Cyber Zeitgeist – with Dave Bittner (2021) 


    Securing Cyberspace – with Charlie Mitchell (2016) 

    *Beginner Resources* 


    What is Hacking? The Economic Times (n.d.) [web] 


    Ethical Hacking in 8 Minutes, Simplilearn (2020) [8 min video] 


    Cybersecurity in 7 minutes, Simplilearn (2020) [7 min video] 

    Books 


    The Cyberweapons Arms Race, N. Perloth (Bloomsbury, 2021) 


    Cult of the Dead Cow, J. Menn (PublicAffairs, 2020) 


    Breaking & Entering, J. Smith (Mariner Books, 2019) 


    The Art of Invisibility, K. Mitnick (L, B & C, 2017) 


    Ghost in the Wires, K. Mitnick (Back Bay Books, 2012) 


    Kingpin, K. Poulson (Crown, 2012) 


    The Cuckoo’s Egg, C. Stoll (Doubleday, 1989) 


    Neuromancer, W. Gibson (Ace, 1984) 

    Articles 


    2022 State of the Threat: A Year in Review, Secureworks (2022) 


    The Anthropology of Hackers, The Atlantic (2010) 


    Timeline Since 2006: Significant Cyber Incidents, CSIS (n.d.) 

    Documentary 

    DEFCON, The Documentary Network (2013) 
    Resources 

    Government Hacking Bibliography, S. Quinlan, New America Foundation (2016) 
    *Wildcard Resource* 

    “The Aurora Shard” 

    Come to the International Spy Museum to see an ugly chunk of metal. Why? Well, it speaks to a revolution in the relationship between the material world and the non-material world. Broken down? 30 lines of code blew up a 27-ton generator. Zeros and ones ca

    • 1 hr 39 min
    “The Past 75 Years” – with Historian of the CIA Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones

    “The Past 75 Years” – with Historian of the CIA Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones

    Summary
    Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones (Website; Wikipedia) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss his book. He has studied American intelligence for 50 years.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    The CIA and the American presidents they served  

    The founding of the CIA just as America became a global superpower 

    Pearl Harbor, the USSR and covert action under Eisenhower

    Assassinations, controversy, the Church Committee, and 9/11

    Reflections

    How much of the future can we predict

    Intention in history

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    This week’s guest, Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, is Emeritus Professor of American History at the University of Edinburgh. He has been studying American intelligence for half a century and has written a history of the CIA to coincide with its 75th anniversary, entitled: A Question of Standing.   
    This episode with Rhodri is a counterpoint to last week’s episode with Robert Gates: a career historian and a career intelligence officer; a European and an American; a 70,000 feet view and a 30,000 feet one. Interestingly, they were born continents apart within almost a year of each other.  
    Rhodri is the author of over a dozen books, has a Ph.D. from Cambridge University, and grew up in Harlech, Wales.  
    And…
    Harlech, Wales, where Rhodri grew up, has the steepest street in the Northern Hemisphere. The steepest street in the Southern Hemisphere, and the world according to Guinness Records, is in Dunedin, New Zealand (Dunedin is Gaelic for Edinburgh). The steepest street in the continental United States is Canton Avenue in Pittsburgh (to celebrate its Welsh heritage the Steel City has a St. David’s Society). Espionage in Welsh is ysbïo.

    Quote of the Week
    "CIA can't afford to rest on its laurels and continue with systems it has. It has to change all the time." – Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*
    “Documents on Origins of CIA,” Truman Library [pdf]
    *SpyCasts*

    “The 75th Anniversary” – with Robert Gates (2022)
    *Beginner Resources*


    History of CIA, CIA (n.d.) [web]


    A Brief History of US-Iran Relations, ABC News (n.d.) [video]


    CIA Involvement in 1953 Iranian Coup, CNN (n.d.] [video]


    Iran & Guatemala, 1953-4, NYT (2003) [article]

    Books


    Covert Action & USFP, L. Johnson (OUP, 2022)


    A Brief History of the CIA, R. Immerman (Wiley, 2014)


    The [Dulles] Brothers, S. Kinzer (St. Martin’s, 2014)


    Mighty Wurlitzer: How CIA Played America, H. Wilford (HUP, 2009)


    Countercoup: Struggle for Iran, K. Roosevelt (McGraw-Hill, 1979)

    Articles

    64 Years Later CIA Releases Details of Iranian Coup, B. Allen-Ebrahimian, FP (2017)
    Video


    “The Nazi Spy Ring in America,” R. Jeffreys-Jones, SPY (2021)


    “Secrecy, Democracy & the Birth of the CIA,” H. Wilford, Great Courses (n.d.)

    Photo

    “The 1953 Iranian Coup,” Radio Free Europe Archives (2013)
    Documentary


    The Spymasters, Showtime (2015)


    CIA: Secret Wars, Part 1, Roche (2003)


    CIA: Secret Wars, Part 2, Roche (2003)

    Curatorial

    Pocket History of CIA, CIA (2014)
    Primary Sources


    History Staff Analysis: CIA & Guatemala Assassination Proposals, 1952-4 (1995)

    Iran 1953: Transcript of Interview with MI6 Officer Norman Darbyshire (1985)


    DCI Dulles to President Eisenhower (1953)


    Telegram from CIA to Station in Iran (1953)


    Telegram from Station in Iran to CIA (1953)


    Monthly Report, Directorate of Plans, CIA (1953)


    Memo from Deputy Director for Plans (Wisner) to DCI Dulles (1953)


    National Security Act (1947)

    Website

    Intelligence Milestones During Eisenhower Administration, Eisenhower Library (n.d.]
    *Wildcard Resource*
    Tom Paine (Common Sense, 1776), Alexis de Tocqueville (Democracy in America, 1835) and Mork from Ork (Mork & Mindy, 1978-82) are all outsiders, like Rhodri, looking in. What can each of them tell us about the United States? What can they tell us that people born within an ecosystem can’t?

    • 1 hr 4 min
    “The 75th Anniversary of the CIA” – with former Director Robert Gates

    “The 75th Anniversary of the CIA” – with former Director Robert Gates

    Summary
    Robert Gates (Website; Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to reflect on the 75th Anniversary of the CIA. He served 8 U.S. presidents. 

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    His reflections on the CIA at 75

    How the CIA’s story intersected with his own  

    His take on the organization’s strengths and weaknesses 

    The complex intl. environment the CIA must now help America navigate

    Reflections

    Twists of fate

    Identity and institutions 

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    Robert M. Gates is the first career officer in the CIA’s history to rise from entry level employee to Director. He spent 27 years at CIA, nine of those at the NSC. More recently, he was the first Secretary of Defense to be asked to remain in office by a newly elected president. In all, he served 8 presidents. 
    Wouldn’t you love to know his take on the CIA at 75? Well, we’ve made that happen for you!
    He was born in Wichita, Kansas, served in the U.S.A.F. and he received his undergraduate education at William & Mary, his masters from Indiana University, and his doctorate from Georgetown University. He was formerly the President of Texas A&M University and the current Chancellor of William & Mary. 
    And…
    The academic institutions Dr. Gates has been associated with all have quite different capacities of football stadium: Georgetown University’s Cooper Field can hold 3,750; William & Mary’s Zable Stadium can hold 12,259; Indiana University’s Memorial Stadium can hold 52,626; and Texas A&M’s Kyle Stadium can hold a whopping 102,733. What could we infer about Dr. Gates, college sports, or the United States from this information? Well, that would be thinking like an intelligence analyst.

    Quote of the Week
    "I've led four very big, very different institutions and like all of them I always saw where places where CIA could be better. But I always loved the place, and I always was proud to work there and proud of the people that I knew…they were probably the smartest, most honest people I've ever met and worked with." – Robert Gates.

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*

    “Reorganization in the Intel. Community,” DCI Gates (1992)

    Watch this prescient clip on historical naivete, or if you’re hardcore, the entire congressional testimony


    *SpyCasts*


    “Dealing with Russia” – with Jim Olson (2022)


    “I was a Presidential Daily Briefer on 9/11” – with Mike Morell (2021)

    *Beginner Resources*


    History of CIA, CIA (n.d.) [website]


    CIA Director’s Portrait Gallery, CIA (n.d.) [online gallery]


    Impact of President G.H.W. Bush’s Foreign Policy, MSNBC (2018) [13 min. video]


    At 75, CIA Back Where it Started, Countering Kremlin, G. Myre, NPR (2022) [5 min. audio]

    Books


    Spymasters: CIA Directors, C. Whipple (S&S, 2020)


    Duty, R. Gates (Vintage, 2015) [Def. Sec. memoir]


    A World Transformed, Bush & Scowcroft (Knopf, 1998)


    From the Shadows, R. Gates (S&S, 1996) [CIA memoir]


    Power & Principle, Z. Brzezinski (FS&G, 1983) [Gates was Z.B.’s Special Asst. at the NSC during the Carter era]

    Articles


    A More Realistic Strategy for the Post-Cold War Era, R. Gates, WaPo (2022)


    Creation of the Central Intelligence Group, M. Warner, SII (1996) 

    Video


    Legacy of the G.H.W.B. Administration, CFR (2016)


    Book Talk: From the Shadows, R. Gates, C-Span (1996)

    Documentary

    The Spymasters, Showtime (2015)
    Curatorial

    Pocket History of CIA, CIA (2014)
    Primary Sources


    Biden Speech on 75th Anniversary of the CIA (2022)


    Robert Gates on CIA and Openness (1992)


    Nomination of Gates to be DCI (1991)


    Adm. Roscoe, First CIA Director Dies (1982) 


    CIA Review of the World Situation (1947)


    Lester to Truman re Centralized Intelligence (1947) 


    National Security Act (1947)

    *Wildcard Resource*


    North by Northwest (Hitchcock, 1959)


    We hear the first explicit mention of “CIA” in a major movie

     “FBI. CIA. ONI. We’re all in the same alphabet soup.”

    • 1 hr 4 min
    "CIA Reports Officer, Russian Yacht Watcher, Satirist” – with Alex Finley

    "CIA Reports Officer, Russian Yacht Watcher, Satirist” – with Alex Finley

    Summary
    Alex Finley (Twitter; Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss life as a CIA Reports Officer turned author. She lives in Barcelona.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    Her take on CIA analysts vs. case officers 

    Information and disinformation in fact and fiction 

    Ukraine, the 2016 election and the Russian historical playbook 

    The regularity even mundanity of much of daily intelligence life 

    Reflections

    Being an American in Barcelona 

    Viewing your own country from outside the goldfish bowl

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    Alex Finley spent 6 years in the CIA as a Reports Officer - whom she describes as a bridge between the case officers and analysts. She is author of a trilogy of novels on the exploits of fictional CIA officer Victor Caro. Her most recent book, Victor in Trouble, completes the series (…or does it?) by looking at Russian influence operations and the contemporary intelligence landscape through a satirical lens. 
    She now lives in Barcelona, Spain - and yes, apparently it’s as awesome as it sounds! – and she is the voice behind #YachtWatch, which tracks and exposes the activities of Russian oligarchs and their superyachts. 
    And…
    Satire is often described as fitting into three categories: Horatian, which offers light comedy and social commentary (e.g., Pride & Prejudice, Parks & Rec, The Colbert Report); Juvenalian, a darker and more abrasive take that can often take the form of speaking truth to power (e.g., Animal Farm, American Psycho, South Park) and Menippean, which casts moral judgement on beliefs or generic character flaws (e.g., Alice in Wonderland, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Saturday Night Live). Which one does Alex use? 

    Quote of the Week
    "There, there were points where I found myself in the middle of nowhere, West Africa. And there are these moments where…how did I end up here? This makes zero sense. And then there were the bureaucratic Catch-22s." – Alex Finley.

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*


    Who are the Russian Oligarchs? (2022)

    A great visulacapitalist.com infographic - but if you want to go understand how they can afford their superyachts, start here


    *SpyCasts*


    CIA Officers Turned Authors – David McCloskey & James Stejskal (2022)


    NSA, CIA, Author - Alma Katsu (2021)


    Victor in the Rubble – Alex Finley (2016)

    *Beginner Resources*


    A Brief History of Spy Fiction, Stella Rimington, Crime Reads, (2018) [short essay]


    An Introduction to Satire, Jackson School District (n.d.) [2-page guide]


    Russia’s Top Five Disinformation Narratives, State (2022) [webpage]

    Books


    Victor in Trouble, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2022)


    The Revenge of Power, M. Naim (St. Martin’s, 2022)


    Active Measures, T. Rid (Picador, 2021)


    The Misinformation Age, C. O’Connor & J. Weatherall (YUP, 2020)


    Victor in The Jungle, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2019)


    Victor in The Rubble, A. Finley (Smiling Hippo, 2016)


    Great Spy Stories from Fiction, A. Dulles (Harper, 1969)

    Articles


    The Russian Firehose of Falsehood, C. Paul & M. Matthews, RAND (2016)


    Yellow Journalism, PBS (n.d.)

    Videos


    The Spy Writers You Love to Read, SPY (2019) 


    Russian Active Measures: Past, Present & Future, CSIS (2018)


    The Strategy Behind Russia’s Disinformation Campaigns, DW News (n.d.)


    Meet the KGB Spies Who Invented Fake News, NYT (n.d.)

    Reports

    Combatting Targeted Disinformation Campaigns, DHS (2019)
    Primary Sources


    Disinformation: Russian Active Measures, Senate Intelligence Committee (2017)


    KGB Active Measures in SW Asia in 1980-82, Wilson Center


    Primary Source Collections

    Rumor Control Project Documents, Library of Congress 
    *Wildcard Resource*


    A Clockwork Orange (1962) [novel]

    A short, sharp satire that ruminates on the nature of society and free will – it will stay with you for a long time to come

    • 1 hr 6 min
    "The Counterterrorism and Counter WMD Strategist" – with Dexter Ingram.

    "The Counterterrorism and Counter WMD Strategist" – with Dexter Ingram.

    Summary
    Dexter Ingram (LinkedIn; Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss his varied career. He has a very cool private collection of spy gadgets.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    What spy gadget he would save if his house were on fire

    How the hunt for a spy artifact “gets his blood pumping”

    Using intelligence to achieve concrete policy objectives

    His preference for Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT) while working with international partners

    Reflections

    Vulnerability and trust

    Building and leveraging relationships 

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    Dexter Ingram is the Acting Director at the Office of the Special Envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS and in his spare time a passionate collector of intelligence artifacts and gadgets.
    He has performed a variety of roles at the Department of State – he was on a Provincial Reconstruction Team in Afghanistan, he was a Counterterrorism Coordinator at Interpol in Lyon, France, and has a deep interest in counterterrorism, counterproliferation and WMD. He was formerly a Naval Flight Officer and White House Intern with the US Navy and has studied at Hampton University, University of Oklahoma, and the National Defense University.
    In part of our ongoing effort to look at consumers of intelligence as well as producers - i.e., who eats the sausages as well as who makes them - we touch on the various parts of Dexter’s career that intersect with intelligence. 
    And…
    Hampton University, where Dexter studied for his undergrad, is one of over 100 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) in the United States. It sits near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay (incidentally on the same peninsula as “The Farm,” a covert training facility for CIA operations officers). Many leaders of the black community have attended HBCU’s, such as Booker T. Washington (Hampton), W.E.B. Du Bois (Fisk), Martin Luther King (Morehouse), Jesse Jackson (North Carolina A&T), and Kamala Harris (Howard). 

    Quote of the Week
    "It's about real people. These are real gadgets better than the movies. It gets my blood pumping." – Dexter Ingram on collecting artifacts.

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*


    “Shall We All Commit Suicide?” (1924)

    One of Churchill’s most powerful and prophetic essays on the destructive powers unleashed by modern science

    *SpyCasts*


    Spy of the Century Kim Philby & Artifacts (2022)


    ISIS Leader Al Mawla – Part 1 (2022)


    ISIS Leader Al Mawla – Part II (2022)


    Intelligence and the WMD Fiasco (2008)

    *Beginner Resources*


    100 Years of Intl. Police Cooperation, Interpol (2014) [video]


    Our History, Interpol (n.d.) [website]


    Nuclear Proliferation & Nonproliferation: What you Need to Know, CFR (2019) [video] 


    Books


    The Terror Years: Al Qaeda to ISIS, L. Wright (Penguin, 2017)


    Black Flags: Rise of ISIS, J. Warrick (Doubleday, 2015)


    Policing the World: Interpol, M. Anderson (Clarendon, 1989)

    Articles


    “Islamic State’s Khorasan Vision in Asia,” L. Webber & R. Valle, The Diplomat, (2022)


    “Red Notices,” Interpol (n.d.)

    Video


    Deadly Evolution of Nuclear Weapons, Tech Insider, YouTube (2017)


    Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty: What you Need to Know, CFR (2015) [video]


    Sailing in the Sea of OSINT, S. Mercado, CSI (2004)

    Documentary

    Nuclear Tipping Point, NTI, YouTube (2010)
    Interactives

    A Guide to Open-Source Nuclear Detection Work, NTI (2020)
    Resource sites

    OSINT Techniques 
    Primary Source Collections
    Historical Documents, Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS)
    *Wildcard Resource*

    A BBC News Program and Nuclear War (2019)

    “Today” is Britain’s highest profile current affairs radio program, and it has been on air since 1958 - a few consecutive days without it and Britain could launch a nuclear counterstrike. Read more here.

    • 58 min
    “POW’s, Vietnam and Intelligence” – with Pritzker Curator James Brundage

    “POW’s, Vietnam and Intelligence” – with Pritzker Curator James Brundage

    Summary
    James Brundage (LinkedIn; Twitter) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss prisoners-of-war and intelligence. He is the Curator at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library in Chicago. 

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    The intelligence dynamics of “prisoners-of-war”

    Tap codes and other ways to covertly communicate

    Using POWs for propaganda

    Debriefing POWs after their release 

    Reflections

    Comparing across time (WWII, Korea, Vietnam, etc.)

    Comparing within time (German/Japanese/American POW camps during WWII)

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    What intelligence questions are generated when we discuss “prisoners of war”? The prisoner’s side asks: what happened? Are they alive? If so, where? What did they know? Can they compromise operations? Can we get them out? The other side asks: what do they know? Can they tell us anything we don’t know? Are they misleading us? The prisoner asks: where are we? Are there any friendlies? Can we share information to escape? 
    To answer these questions, this week’s guest is James Brundage who curated the May 22-Apr 23 exhibit, “Life Behind the Wire: POW” which explores life in captivity. He is a public historian who has also worked at the Obama Presidential Library, the Chicago History Museum & the James Garfield Historic Site. 
    And…
    Jeremiah Denton Jr. was shot down while leading an attack over North Vietnam in 1965 and the title of his memoir, When Hell Was in Session, gives you an idea of what he endured during his captivity. As part of a propaganda campaign, the North Vietnamese arranged for him to be interviewed by a Japanese reporter. Hi blinked T-O-R-T-U-R-E in Morse code. Needless to say, the intelligence community took great interest in the video footage. He passed away in 2014. 

    Quote of the Week
    "So roughly 1% of the POW population perished in Europe at the hands of the Germans versus in Japan…the death rate was almost 40%. A lot of that was the conditions of the camp…in Vietnam, of the more than 700 American POWs, there were 73 who perished in POW camps in North Vietnam, which is roughly 10%." – James Brundage

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*


    The Railway Man: A POW’s Searing Account, E. Lomax (Norton, 2014) 

    A powerful, powerful memoir. Lomax had nightmares about his WWII experience for over half a century.

    *SpyCasts*


    Operation Chaos – Matthew Sweet (2018)


    Eavesdropping in Vietnam – Tom Glenn (2012)


    Studies & Observations Group – Donald Blackburn (2012) 


    Intelligence Lessons from Vietnam – Rufus Phillips (2009)

    *Beginner Resources*


    The Vietnam War Explained in 25 Minutes, The Life Guide (n.d.) ([video] 


    Intelligence in the Vietnam War, Vietnam War 50th [posters]


    POW’s: What You Need to Know, ICRC (2022) [webpage]

    Books


    Spies on the Mekong, K. Conboy (Casemate, 2021)


    War of Numbers, S. Adams (Steerforth, 2020)


    Tap Code, C. Harris & S. Berry (Zondervan, 2019)

    Articles


    Meet the Hero: Douglas Hegdahl, Milliken Center (n.d.)


    OSS’s Role in Ho Chi Minh’s Rise, B. Bergin, SII 62/2 (2018)


    Intel. Support to Comms. with POWs in Vietnam, G. Peterson & D. Taylor, SII 60/1 (2016)


    Takes on Intelligence and the Vietnam War, C. Laurie, SII 55/2 (2011)

    Documentaries


    The Vietnam War, K. Burns & L. Novick (2017)


    The Fog of War, R. McNamara (2003)


    Hearts & Minds, P. Davis (1974)

    Oral Histories

    Veterans History Project

    Vietnam POW Interviews, U.S.N.I.

    Primary Sources


    POW/MIA Closed Briefing, DD CIA (1991)


    Report on US-Vietnamese Talks on POW/MIAs (1985)


    Causes, Origins & Lessons of the Vietnam War (1972)


    The POW Scandal in Korea (1954)

    *Wildcard Resource*
    Interestingly, philosophers Ludwig Wittgenstein, John Paul Sartre, Paul Riceour, Emmanuel Levinas and Louis Althusser were all POWs – now, the impact this had on their thinking would be one hell of a rabbit hole to go down!

    • 1 hr 2 min

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