294 episodes

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

The Inquiry BBC

    • News
    • 5.0, 5 Ratings

The Inquiry gets beyond the headlines to explore the trends, forces and ideas shaping the world.

    What does Putin want?

    What does Putin want?

    President Vladimir Putin has been in power for 20 years. The Russian people have been voting on a change to the constitution that could keep him in the Kremlin until 2036. While world leaders and opponents struggle to second guess him, some objectives appear to be clear: stability at home, respect abroad and power maintained for his inner circle.

    Presented by Charmaine Cozier

    (President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, February 2020. Credit: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Why do we care about statues?

    Why do we care about statues?

    The killing of African American George Floyd ignited anti-racist protests around the world - many centred on statues associated with colonialism and slavery. Why do these figures of bronze and stone generate such strong feelings? And what do they tell us about how countries deal with their past?

    Contributors:
    Sarah Beetham Chair of Liberal Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy in the Fine Arts.
    Ghaith Abdul-Ahad journalist for The Guardian newspaper.
    AGK Menon, architect, urban planner and founder of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage.
    Daniel Libeskind, architect.

    Presenter: Kavita Puri


    (Protesters attempt to pull down the statue of Andrew Jackson near the White House June 22, 2020 in Washington, DC. Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    How will Hollywood respond to the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements?

    How will Hollywood respond to the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements?

    Why is the movie business having trouble representing the world’s population on and behind the big screen? A rising share of the U.S. population are black, more than half of the demographic are female – so why is it so difficult to translate this into cinema?

    Hollywood has found itself red-faced in an era of Black Lives Matter and MeToo movements. From #OscarsSoWhite to criticism of who’s behind the films we see, the pressure to change is stacking up.

    Charmaine Cozier discovers the issues within the industry and what movie bosses prioritise over diversity. But will activists, actors and data be enough to convince big studios that the revolution is here – or will it just be business as usual?

    Guests:
    April Reign, Diversity and Inclusion Advocate and creator of the #OscarsSoWhite movement
    Naomi McDougall-Jones, a film producer, writer and women in film activist
    Darnell Hunt, Dean of Social Sciences at UCLA and Professor of Sociology in African American Studies. He is co-author of the UCLA Hollywood Diversity report
    Bonnie Greer, a writer and critic


    Presenter: Charmaine Cozier/ Producer: Bethan Head

    (Actor John Boyega raises his fist in protest at a Black Lives Matter march in London, UK (Credit: Daniel Leal-Olivas /Getty Images)

    • 24 min
    Will Covid-19 change cities?

    Will Covid-19 change cities?

    From the bubonic plague and cholera to tuberculosis, pandemics have changed the ways cities have been designed and built. The coronavirus has been no different: with cities all over the world on lockdown, our cities have changed to become quieter, greener, with wildlife returning on an unprecedented scale. Now, with the lockdowns beginning to ease, Kavita Puri asks: what is the future of our cities? Will they return to the way they were - and do we want them to?

    Producer: Eleanor Biggs
    Presenter: Kavita Puri


    (Parisians cycle through the streets of Paris on the Rue de Rivoli, which has been made almost entirely cycleable. Photo:Samuel Boivin/Getty Images)

    • 23 min
    Why do US cops keep killing unarmed black men?

    Why do US cops keep killing unarmed black men?

    Why is George Floyd the latest in a long line of unarmed black men killed by US police? Studies show black men are three times more likely to be killed by police in America than white people.

    With Helena Merriman.


    (A man speaks into a bullhorn as demonstrators march in Los Angeles, California. 2 June 2020. Brent Stirton/Getty Images)

    • 22 min
    How far can the Chinese government be blamed for Covid-19?

    How far can the Chinese government be blamed for Covid-19?

    Ever since a mysterious virus was reported in December 2019 in the Chinese city of Wuhan, the world has been watching China.

    Silenced whistleblowers, unregulated wildlife trade in wet markets, limited international cooperation, and even a local biosafety lab have been held up as examples of how China mishandled the crisis. But how far can it be blamed for Covid-19 becoming a pandemic?

    This week on The Inquiry, Kavita Puri asks what the Chinese government could, or should, have done differently to prevent a global catastrophe.

    Producer: Eleanor Biggs
    Presenter: Kavita Puri



    (A man drags a handcart across an emptied road on February 5, 2020 during lockdown in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. Getty Images)

    • 24 min

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