187 episodes

Parts Per Billion is Bloomberg Law's environmental policy podcast. We cover everything from air pollution, to toxic chemicals, to corporate sustainability, and climate change. The reporters from our environment desk offer an inside look at what's happening at Congress, in the courts, and at the federal agencies, and help explain the scientific and policy debates shaping environmental laws and regulations. Host: David Schultz

Parts Per Billion Bloomberg

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 48 Ratings

Parts Per Billion is Bloomberg Law's environmental policy podcast. We cover everything from air pollution, to toxic chemicals, to corporate sustainability, and climate change. The reporters from our environment desk offer an inside look at what's happening at Congress, in the courts, and at the federal agencies, and help explain the scientific and policy debates shaping environmental laws and regulations. Host: David Schultz

    States Scramble on Water Rights Pact as Deadline Nears

    States Scramble on Water Rights Pact as Deadline Nears

    As a multidecade megadrought continues in the West, the Colorado River Basin is drying up. Today we’ll talk about what that means for the millions of people who depend on that water. And we’ll look at what states and regulators are doing to ensure that communities get the water they need to survive.

    Seven western states are frantically working to reach an agreement on how to divvy up the available water ahead of a Feb. 1 deadline—at which point the federal government has suggested it would impose its own rules to fix the problem.

    That's the topic of discussion on today's Parts Per Billion, our weekly environmental podcast. Bloomberg Law’s water and public lands reporter, Bobby Magill, explains what's at stake—and which states might get first dibs at the dwindling water supply.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 14 min
    An Energy Regulator Crossed Manchin, Now He's Gone

    An Energy Regulator Crossed Manchin, Now He's Gone

    About a year ago, Richard Glick was chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and was poised to get renominated to a new term. Today, he's out of the job.

    Glick's plans to more closely scrutinize gas pipeline projects ran afoul of the powerful chairman of the Senate Energy Committee, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.). Without Manchin's support, the Biden administration couldn't get Glick's nomination through the Senate.

    Bloomberg Law reporter Daniel Moore spoke to Glick shortly before his term at FERC expired and he joins our environmental podcast, Parts Per Billion, to talk about what went down and about how losing Glick will affect the Biden administration's climate change goals.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 16 min
    Fusion Is Promising, but Isn't a Near-Term Solution

    Fusion Is Promising, but Isn't a Near-Term Solution

    News of the world's first nuclear fusion reaction with a net energy gain created a lot of excitement, and justifiably so—fusion could one day be an infinitely renewable, carbon-free energy source.

    Policy makers, including President Joe Biden, said they want to see a fusion reactor providing electricity to the American grid within 10 years. But scientists say that timeline is probably too ambitious, if not impossible.

    On today's episode of our environmental policy podcast, Parts Per Billion, Bloomberg News reporter Will Wade explains the promise of nuclear fusion power, what a realistic timeline for its development looks like, and whether it might draw research funding away from other renewable energy projects.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 11 min
    Big Tech Is Now a Big Player in US Energy Markets

    Big Tech Is Now a Big Player in US Energy Markets

    Companies like Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Meta are now some of the country's largest consumers of electric power. And as Bloomberg Law's Daniel Moore reports, they're starting to wield their strong purchasing power.

    Big Tech companies are pushing the energy industry to bring more renewable power projects online, Moore says, and they're also hiring energy lobbyists to achieve these goals in Washington.

    Moore joins our environmental policy podcast, Parts Per Billion, to talk about where the tech industry wants the country's electric grid to go and what that means for both utilities and ratepayers.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 15 min
    Manchin Still a Huge Factor on Energy in New Congress

    Manchin Still a Huge Factor on Energy in New Congress

    The 117th Congress is coming to a close at the end of this year and, now that most of the midterm races have been called and partisan control of both chambers decided, we have a pretty good idea of what the dynamics will be in the new 118th.

    Bloomberg Government energy reporter Kellie Lunney joins this episode of Parts Per Billion, our environmental policy podcast, to talk about what to expect on Capitol Hill for the next two years. For one, she says, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W. Va.) will maintain considerable influence over the chamber as his party's surprising performance in the midterms means he'll continue to lead the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

    Even if Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.) wins the December runoff against Republican Herschel Walker and becomes the Senate's 51st Democrat, Manchin could still jam things up for his party on any number of issues.

    Lunney also talks about what could happen during the lame duck session currently under way, and specifically about whether any environmental provisions will hitch a ride on two huge pieces of must-pass legislation.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 17 min
    EV Mineral Demand May End Alaska Natives' Way of Life

    EV Mineral Demand May End Alaska Natives' Way of Life

    The Biden administration has made it crystal clear that, to solve climate change, we need to source more of the critical minerals that go into electric batteries--and we need to source them domestically.

    One potentially huge source of these minerals is in northern Alaska. But what will that mean for the Alaska Natives who have been living off of the land there for centuries?

    On this episode of Parts Per Billion, Bloomberg Law reporter Bobby Magill tells us about his trip to northern Alaska and why the Native population there feels so ambivalent about this modern day gold rush.

    Do you have feedback on this episode of Parts Per Billion? Give us a call and leave a voicemail at 703-341-3690.
    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

duckstew1234567890 ,

A little disappointing

I’m a little disappointed in the recent episode from 1.13.21. Singling out Jay Leno to fit your narrative regardless of your parent company is irresponsible. Let’s address the actual issue with ethanol fuel does cause poor performance of the vehicle’s mechanics in many models of vehicles. And not just the classic models that Jay loves but in many modern vehicles as well.

What you’re failing to acknowledge here is that ethanol is supported as an initiative by several wealthy, big companies and sure may benefit the farmers to some degree but overall isn’t a prime fuel choice. There are better fuel alternatives that exist within the renewable energy sector but don’t have the same support as Ethanol.

It just overall made your podcast go down a notch for me. You showed your bias and I’m not sure listening will be the same.

Aa85667 ,

Excellent pod

Interesting topics, compelling host. Would definitely recommend.

Ponterbee ,

Subscribe This!

The most important new podcast to come out in years- I'll be waiting for each new episode with desperate impatience!

I used to think climate change happened some place else : where there's lots of snowfall, certain regions of Africa, or islands in the South Pacific ...

We just had the warmest winter ever here in Tucson- No snow covered the mountain tops to the north and east. The constant fluctuations in temperature have played havoc with our environment. The insects arrive with spring weather in early January, then get wiped out 36 hours later from another brief cold snap.

It's terrifying, it's real, and it's here. I'm just not very hopeful that the majority will be able to look around and wake up in time or not...

A vital podcast such as this can only help.

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