240 episodes

Interviews with scholars of the Caribbean about their new books.
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New Books in Caribbean Studies Marshall Poe

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 14 Ratings

Interviews with scholars of the Caribbean about their new books.
Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

    Ethnography, Humility, Identity, and the Academy

    Ethnography, Humility, Identity, and the Academy

    In today’s episode of How To Be Wrong we welcome Dr. Khytie Brown, who is an assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Brown’s research examines the intersections of religion, race, gender and sexual alterity, criminality, material culture, sensory epistemologies and social media practices among African diasporic religious practitioners in the Caribbean, Latin America and North America. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard and is a research associate at the Center on Transnational Policing at Princeton. Our conversation explores the humbling power of ethnographic research as well as ways in which race and gender influence perceptions about academic identity and power.
    John Kaag is Professor and Chair of Philosophy at UMass Lowell and External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. John W. Traphagan, Ph.D. is Professor and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Fellow in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also a professor in the Program in Human Dimensions of Organizations.
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    • 1 hr 20 min
    Lisa Blackmore and Liliana Gómez, "Liquid Ecologies in Latin American and Caribbean Art" (Routledge, 2020)

    Lisa Blackmore and Liliana Gómez, "Liquid Ecologies in Latin American and Caribbean Art" (Routledge, 2020)

    In this podcast, Lisa Blackmore, Senior Lecture in the School of Philosophy, History and Interdisciplinary Studies Center at the University of Essex, and Liliana Gomez, Professor of Art and Society at the University of Kassel, introduce their edited volume Liquid Ecologies in Latin American and Caribbean art (Routledge, 2020) and the multiple ways it proposes to "think with water". Spotlighting the ways in which artists in the Americas have long been in dialogue with water, liquids and fluids as material signifiers and ontological materials, the authors in this volume examine artists and works that open up larger discussions about history, ecology, temporality, memory, activism and more.
    This interdisciplinary book brings into dialogue research on how different fluids and bodies of water are mobilised as liquid ecologies in the arts in Latin America and the Caribbean. Examining the visual arts, including multimedia installations, performance, photography and film, the chapters place diverse fluids and systems of flow in art historical, ecocritical and cultural analytical contexts. 
    Elize Mazadiego is an art historian in Modern and Contemporary art (PhD, University of California San Diego), with a specialism in Latin American art. She is currently a Marie SkłodowskaCurie fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of the book Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021).
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    • 1 hr 7 min
    Alejandro de la Fuente and Ariela J. Gross, "Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

    Alejandro de la Fuente and Ariela J. Gross, "Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

    How did Africans become 'blacks' in the Americas? Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana (Cambridge UP, 2020) tells the story of enslaved and free people of color who used the law to claim freedom and citizenship for themselves and their loved ones. Their communities challenged slaveholders' efforts to make blackness synonymous with slavery. Looking closely at three slave societies - Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana - Alejandro de la Fuente and Ariela J. Gross demonstrate that the law of freedom - not slavery - established the meaning of blackness in law. Contests over freedom determined whether and how it was possible to move from slave to free status, and whether claims to citizenship would be tied to racial identity. Laws regulating the lives and institutions of free people of color created the boundaries between black and white, the rights reserved to white people, and the degradations imposed only on black people.
    Brandon T. Jett, professor of history at Florida SouthWestern State College, creator of the Lynching in LaBelle Digital History Project, and author of Race, Crime, and Policing in the Jim Crow South (LSU Press, 202) Twitter: @DrBrandonJett1
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    • 1 hr 1 min
    Ashley M. Williard, "Engendering Islands: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Violence in the Early French Caribbean" (U Nebraska Press, 2021)

    Ashley M. Williard, "Engendering Islands: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Violence in the Early French Caribbean" (U Nebraska Press, 2021)

    In Engendering Islands: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Violence in the Early French Caribbean (University of Nebraska Press, 2021), Dr. Ashley M. Williard demonstrates how problematics of gender played a central role in defining colonial others, male and female, at the moment when slavery was first introduced in the French-controlled Antilles. The book argues that seventeenth-century French Caribbean reconstructions of masculinity and femininity helped sustain and justify occupation, slavery, and nascent ideas of race. In the face of historical silences, Williard’s close readings of archival and narrative texts reveals the words, images, and perspectives that reflected and produced new ideas of human difference in this colonial context. Juridical, religious, and medical discourses expose the interdependence of multiple conditions—male and female, enslaved and free, Black and white, Indigenous and displaced, normative and disabled—in the islands claimed for the French Crown.
    R. Grant Kleiser is a Ph.D. candidate in the Columbia University History Department. His dissertation researches the development of the free-port system in the eighteenth-century Caribbean, investigating the rationale for such moves towards “free trade” and the impact these policies had on subsequent philosophers, policy-makers, and revolutionaries in the Atlantic world.
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    • 48 min
    Anjanette Delgado, "Home in Florida: Latinx Writers and the Literature of Uprootedness" (UP of Florida Press, 2021)

    Anjanette Delgado, "Home in Florida: Latinx Writers and the Literature of Uprootedness" (UP of Florida Press, 2021)

    Today I spoke to Anjanette Delgado, a Puerto Rican writer and journalist based in Miami who has compiled emblematic stories and essays by writers from many countries who congregate in the city of Miami and the state of Florida. The stories are about those who have been touched by the Florida and Miami experience, and who have made the state their home. Her anthology titled Home in Florida. Latinx Writers and the Literature of Uprootedness published by the University of Florida Press Gainesville in 2021 has won the silver medal for the Independent Publishing Book awards. She is also the author of The Heartbreak Pill: A novel and the The Clairvoyant of Calle Ocho. She has written for the The New York Times “Modern Love” column, Vogue, NPR, HBO, the Kenyon Review and the Hong Kong Review.
    Through this corpus on the immigrant experience, the reader will get the distillation of Florida’s multiculturalism and also gain insights on the in betweenness of the minority and majority in America.
    On the one hand there are those who feel Miami is a city lost to the American heartland but continue to flock there to enjoy the café cortadito and the myriad joys of having the foreign in the midst of Sameness. And then there the displaced and uprooted in a “halfway house” of exile. A variety of genres: poetry, love letters, prose songs, jokes all hang together in this poignant compilation of the involuntary wanderer.
    Minni Sawhney is a professor of Hispanic Studies at the University of Delhi
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    • 51 min
    Diana McCaulay, "Daylight Come" (Peepal Tree Press, 2020)

    Diana McCaulay, "Daylight Come" (Peepal Tree Press, 2020)

    It is 2084. Climate change has made life on the Caribbean island of Bajacu a gruelling trial. The sun is so hot that people must sleep in the day and live and work at night. In a world of desperate scarcity, people who reach forty are expendable. Those who still survive in the cities and towns are ruled over by the brutal, fascistic Domins, and the order has gone out for another evacuation to less sea-threatened parts of the capital.Sorrel can take no more and she persuades her mother, Bibi, that they should flee the city and head for higher ground in the interior.  
    Daylight Come (Peepal Tree Press, 2020) is a great story, a call to action, and a meditation on love and lost beauty. Diana McCauley has been an environmental activist for many years. Here, she uses her storytelling powers to produce a world that is both unrecognizable and familiar. 
    Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. @alebronf
    Website.
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    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

Mas Reg ,

Great Personal Study

There are so many interesting facts in this podcast. From Ruma Chopra to Darwin I have personally learned many historical moments not discussed in school. This is my go to podcast.

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