18 episodes

Join journalist Annalise Klingbeil and producer Kerianne Sproule as they dive into current municipal issues with community leaders, policy makers, politicians, journalists and — most importantly — everyday Calgarians.
We take you beyond the daily headlines, and delve into topics that pique our interest and yours through in-depth reporting, entertaining conversation and engaging audio.

The Confluence Annalise Klingbeil and Kerianne Sproule

    • News

Join journalist Annalise Klingbeil and producer Kerianne Sproule as they dive into current municipal issues with community leaders, policy makers, politicians, journalists and — most importantly — everyday Calgarians.
We take you beyond the daily headlines, and delve into topics that pique our interest and yours through in-depth reporting, entertaining conversation and engaging audio.

    Ep. 17: City hall's greatest hits

    Ep. 17: City hall's greatest hits

    Ten current and former city hall reporters talk about their favourite memories with host Annalise Klingbeil.

    1. Robson Fletcher invents a word that’s now part of the Calgary lexicon

    2. The famous Lucas Meyer unveils his highlight reel of council impressions

    3. Helen Pike on puns, zucchinis and threats

    4. Bill Kaufmann reveals what happened in Las Vegas

    5. Jason Markusoff, of the pearl-clutching media, chuckles in shock
    6. Shawn Logan reflects on a time before strict security
    7. Rick Bell for mayor 1998
    8. Colette Derworiz speaks about a career highlight

    9. Dave Dormer with an important lesson about running up stairs
    10. Annalise Klingbeil says goodbye and thank you

    Ep. 16: Alberta’s Opioid Crisis — 'There's no end in sight'

    Ep. 16: Alberta’s Opioid Crisis — 'There's no end in sight'

    Across Alberta, there were 482 opioid-related accidental deaths in the first nine months of 2017.

    Ep. 15: ‘We only really notice things when they’re gone’

    Ep. 15: ‘We only really notice things when they’re gone’

    For years, more than 30,000 drivers a day rolled by a long row of character homes along Memorial Drive, west of 10 Street N.W., with little thought.
    When a construction fence surrounded the homes, some Calgarians took note.
    After a bulldozer destroyed the vacated abodes, all of a sudden, citizens remarked that something was missing from their daily commutes.

    “We only really notice things when they’re gone,” says Josh Traptow (https://twitter.com/jtraptow?lang=en), the executive director of the Calgary Heritage Authority.
    On this episode, host Annalise Klingbeil (https://twitter.com/AnnaliseAK) speaks to Traptow about all things heritage, in a city with a reputation for bulldozing its past.
    “Calgary, especially in the 70s, 80s and 90s tore down, really, a lot of amazing buildings,” says Traptow.
    “Calgarians really want to save what they have left. In another 100 years, who knows what they’re going to have.”
    Traptow and Klingbeil cover a wide range of topics including the archaic terms listed on historic Calgary land titles, why a young Calgarian cares so much about old things, and how to designate your own abode as a municipal historic resource. 
    As always, Kerianne Sproule (https://twitter.com/keriannecam) makes the podcast sound great. And, your feedback, advice, ideas, shares and iTunes reviews are appreciated.
    Here are links to a few of the news articles mentioned in this episode:
    Are 'run of the mill' heritage homes worthy of preservation? Advocates argue yes (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/are-run-of-the-mill-heritage-homes-worthy-of-preservation-advocates-argue-yes)
    ‘Wow is this ever a cool house:’ Owner of home built in 1975 requests municipal historic resource designation (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/wow-is-this-ever-a-cool-house-owner-of-home-built-in-1975-requests-municipal-historic-resource-designation)
    Concrete connection to Calgary’s past preserved in sidewalk stamps (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/concrete-connection-to-calgarys-past-preserved-in-sidewalk-stamps)
    (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/concrete-connection-to-calgarys-past-preserved-in-sidewalk-stamps)Request to preserve one of Canada's last remaining 'Trend Houses' goes to city council (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/request-to-preserve-one-of-canadas-last-remaining-trend-houses-goes-to-city-council)

     

    Ep. 14: SW BRT 101 (Why expanded transit is so controversial in southwest Calgary)

    Ep. 14: SW BRT 101 (Why expanded transit is so controversial in southwest Calgary)

    When city council debated a pair of dedicated bus lanes proposed for southwest Calgary this week, it wasn't the first time — and it likely won't be the last.
    Despite getting the green light from council in 2011, controversy over the southwest bus rapid transit (BRT) project continues to rear its head.
    "It seems that every six months to a year, we’re going through the southwest BRT," said Ward 14 Coun. Peter Demong during the latest debate.
    On this episode, host Annalise Klingbeil and producer Kerianne Sproule dive deep into the history of the proposed 22-kilometre route.
    From a 2010 city brochure that landed in southwest mailboxes to the latest council vote, we explore the ongoing drama surrounding expanded transit service — drama that's unusual, even for Calgary.
    Think of it as a crash course in the saga that has become the southwest BRT.

    As always, your feedback, advice, ideas, shares and iTunes and Facebook reviews are appreciated.

    Ep.13: 'Not your grandma's suburb'

    Ep.13: 'Not your grandma's suburb'

    Ward 12 Coun. Shane Keating has a bumper sticker in his office.
    It says: "I do suburbs, but I do them right."
    On this episode, host Annalise Klingbeil (https://twitter.com/AnnaliseAK?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) drives (and complains about an abundance of traffic circles) as Keating tours listeners around Calgary's deep south.
    We travel through master-planned, mixed-use, compact neighbourhoods that Keating believes have been done right.
    These aren't the Calgary suburbs of decades past, where single-family, cookie-cutter homes with double-car garages sit on large lots and amenities are a car-ride away.
    The tour starts in Auburn Bay, which was Calgary's fastest growing community in the 2017 city census, and (http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/slight-population-boost-in-calgary-census-enough-to-prompt-optimism) had 4,217 residents when Keating was first elected in 2010.
    Today, more than 16,000 Calgarians live in estate homes, townhouses, apartment complexes, condos and duplexes in Auburn Bay on Calgary's southeastern outskirts.
    In nearby Cranston and McKenzie Towne, there are another 36,665 residents who live in walkable, high-density communities that offer a variety of housing, retail and employment options on the city's outer edge.
    Keating tours us through other communities including Seton — an area that's been transformed from gopher-filled farmland to the downtown of the 'burbs — Quarry Park and Douglasdale.
    As he takes us through some of Calgary's fastest growing communities, Keating speaks about topics including sprawl, the Green Line LRT, living in the deep south without a car, and what's wrong with a closed-minded attitude about new suburbs, all while teaching us about the communities he loves.
    As always, Kerianne Sproule (https://twitter.com/keriannecam) makes us sound great. And, your feedback, advice, ideas, shares and iTunes and Facebook reviews are appreciated.

    Ep. 12: 'It's a blood sport and I don't see any bleeding'

    Ep. 12: 'It's a blood sport and I don't see any bleeding'

    He calls city hall the big blue playpen and he's been covering it for nearly three decades.
    On this episode of the Confluence podcast, host Annalise Klingbeil (https://twitter.com/AnnaliseAK) speaks to ever-opinionated Calgary Sun columnist Rick 'the Dinger' Bell (https://twitter.com/sunrickbell?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) about the looming municipal election.
    With less than three weeks left before voters head to the ballot box, Bell says the mayoral race is shaping up to be interesting because it's not yet clear just who will win council's top seat.
    "In Calgary mayoral elections that's a real novelty. Most elections, if you have someone who is already the mayor, it's just a question of how much do they win by. And in this case, there is doubt as to who the mayor will be on the morning of October 17," Bell says.
    Bell, who admits he voted for the purple revolution in 2010, believes there's a possibility incumbent mayor Naheed Nenshi could lose his seat to businessman and lawyer Bill Smith, or longtime Ward 10 councillor Andre Chabot.
    "I can hear people talking who used to think Nenshi was the God who walked as a man and now are critical of him," Bell says.
    Tune in as Bell details what he sees as disenchantment with Nenshi, why he feels sorry for Chabot, and what he thinks of Smith's strategy to date.
    "What would you do if you had a candidate, who had a chance at winning because the incumbent is not as popular as he once was, but he's not a good speaker, he's not a good answerer of questions, and he doesn't know a whole lot about city hall?" asks Bell.
    Eighty-six people (http://www.calgary.ca/election/Pages/meet-the-candidates/default.aspx) recently signed up to run for a spot at the council table, while 45 people are running for school trustee, and Bell also catches us up on why he refused to speak to the majority of people who came to city hall on nomination day, what ward races he's watching closely, and what he thinks taxpayers deserve this election.
    In addition, knowledgeable Flames Nation reporter Ryan Pike (https://twitter.com/RyanNPike?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor) joins us to talk about the latest bombshell (http://calgaryherald.com/storyline/its-not-going-to-work-flames-president-ken-king-says-team-dropping-pursuit-of-new-calgary-arena) in the ongoing arena saga and catch us up on what's been happening on this file since the Saddledome opened in 1983.
    As always, Kerianne Sproule (https://twitter.com/keriannecam) makes us sound great. And, your feedback, advice, ideas, shares and iTunes reviews are appreciated.

    • 41 min

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To