31 episodes

Present Value is an independent editorial project produced by students at Cornell University’s SC Johnson Graduate School of Management. We aim to bring insights from renowned thought-leaders to curious minds everywhere. New episodes will be released monthly, so subscribe now for more Present Value.

Present Value Podcast Present Value Podcast

    • Business
    • 5.0, 66 Ratings

Present Value is an independent editorial project produced by students at Cornell University’s SC Johnson Graduate School of Management. We aim to bring insights from renowned thought-leaders to curious minds everywhere. New episodes will be released monthly, so subscribe now for more Present Value.

    Innovation, Technological Mergers, and The Pursuit of Teaching | Gautam Ahuja

    Innovation, Technological Mergers, and The Pursuit of Teaching | Gautam Ahuja

    Professor Gautam Ahuja distinguishes between two different types of innovations for a firm, generative appropriability and primary appropriability. He then discusses how a firm can better organize itself to encourage innovation, through investments in fundamental or basic research and, counterintuitively, tighter controls on R&D budgets. Professor Ahuja also discusses what motivated him to leave an attractive job as a regional sales manager, to become a professor and shares some of the challenges that he faced along the way. Gautam Ahuja is the Eleanora and George Landew professor of management and organizations at SC Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University and is an award-winning researcher in the fields of competitive analysis and innovation. Professor Ahuja currently serves as the editor in chief of Organization Science, one of the premier journals in his field. At Johnson, he teaches the popular course Cases in Strategic Management. In 2011, he was ranked the second Most Popular Professor in the United States of America by Bloomberg Business Week and, across his teaching career, he has been selected as the “best professor” by student vote 17 times across MBA, MBA and PhD programs.
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Faculty Profile: Gautam Ahuja - Johnson
    Research Papers: Gautam Ahuja - Google Scholar
    Meet the Faculty: Gautam Ahuja

    • 53 min
    The History of Capitalism and Democracy | Louis Hyman

    The History of Capitalism and Democracy | Louis Hyman

    Louis Hyman discusses the rise of the gig economy and how the gig economy is a consequence of “income volatility.” He discusses the ways businesses and the federal government can support gig economy workers as well as the current “productivity paradox.” He then discusses the history of personal debt in the United States and the tools that were created to expand the use of credit. He also discusses changes to the provision of consumer credit post-2008 financial crisis and his thoughts on whether lending institutions will change their practices towards gig economy workers. Finally, he discusses ways businesses are engaging marginalized groups as both labor pools and consumers.
    Louis Hyman is a historian of work and business at the ILR School of Cornell University, where he also directs the Institute for Workplace Studies in New York City. He has published two books on the history of personal debt (Debtor Nation and Borrow) as well as a book about the history of the rise of consultants, temps, freelancers, and day laborers in our businesses (Temp). A former Fulbright scholar and McKinsey associate, Hyman received his PhD in American history from Harvard University. He teaches the MOOC American Capitalism: A History through EdX and is the founding editor of the Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism book series from Columbia University Press.
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Faculty Profile: Louis Hyman

    • 51 min
    Perspectives on COVID-19 | Andrew Karolyi, Lynn Wooten, Li Chen, Vishal Gaur, and Kaitlin Woolley

    Perspectives on COVID-19 | Andrew Karolyi, Lynn Wooten, Li Chen, Vishal Gaur, and Kaitlin Woolley

    For this special edition episode covering the COVID-19 pandemic, the Present Value team connected with some of Cornell’s top minds to discuss various aspects of the crisis. Dean Andrew Karolyi, Dean Lynn Wooten, Professors Li Chen, Vishal Gaur, and Kaitlin Woolley discuss the impact of COVID-19 on financial markets, crisis leadership, supply chain disruptions and retail operations, as well as personal motivation amidst social distancing.
    Andrew Karolyi is the Deputy Dean and College Dean for Academic Affairs at the Cornell SC Johnson College of Business. He is a professor of finance and holder of the Harold Bierman Jr. Distinguished Professorship in the College’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. He is also a professor of economics in Cornell's College of Arts and Sciences.
    Lynn Wooten is the David J Nolan Dean and Professor of Management and Organizations at Cornell University’s Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.
    Li Chen is an Associate Professor of Operations, Technology and Information Management at the SC Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University.
    Vishal Gaur is the Emerson Professor of Manufacturing Management and an Associate Professor of Operations, Technology and Information Management at the SC Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University.
    Kaitlin Woolley is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and Co-Director of the Center for Behavioral Economics and Decision Research at the SC Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University.
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Faculty Profile: Andrew Karolyi
    Faculty Profile: Lynn Wooten
    Faculty Profile: Li Chen
    Faculty Profile: Vishal Gaur
    Faculty Profile: Kaitlin Woolley
    Research: A New Approach to Measuring Financial Contagion

    • 1 hr 20 min
    Job Promotions, Rational Thinking, and Life Lessons | Michael Waldman

    Job Promotions, Rational Thinking, and Life Lessons | Michael Waldman

    Professor Michael Waldman, a Professor of Economics at Johnson, discusses his decades of research into labor economics, including the role of job promotions, the benefits of lateral moves, and how resume padding may improve social welfare. He also describes his research in rational thinking, planned obsolescence, and product bundling and tying. At the end of the interview, he reflects on the personal life lessons he learned from his father, who survived the Holocaust. 
    Professor Waldman is the Charles H. Dyson Professor of Management and Professor of Economics at the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University. He is widely recognized as a top researcher in the fields of industrial organization, labor economics, and organizational economics. He first joined Cornell in 1991 and since that time has served both Johnson and the university in multiple capacities - including serving on the school’s Strategic Planning Advisory Council. Professor Waldman received a Bachelor of Science in Economics from MIT and a PhD in Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. 
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Faculty Profile: Michael Waldman - Johnson
    Research: IDEAS / SSRN
    NY Times: Planned Obsolescence Article
    Faculty Last Lectures: 2016 - Michael Waldman

    • 41 min
    Bias in Decision-Making, Social Media’s Role in Investor Communication, and I-FOMO | Ryan Guggenmos & Kristina Rennekamp

    Bias in Decision-Making, Social Media’s Role in Investor Communication, and I-FOMO | Ryan Guggenmos & Kristina Rennekamp

    Professor Ryan Guggenmos and Professor Kristina Rennekamp (MS '11 and PhD '12) introduce the field of behavioral accounting by discussing the common biases that individuals, investors, managers, and regulators face when making decisions. From being too overconfident when picking stocks to anchoring on a low number when buying a car - they illustrate the common biases that individuals face and connect these to managerial decisions. They also discuss their research into the evolutions of investment disclosures, including pro-forma earnings, readability, and social media as a new medium. And they describe their newly coined term I-FOMO, Investor Fear of Missing Out, which is used to assess how changing investor communication practices are impacting everyday investors. 
    Ryan Guggenmos is an Assistant Professor of Accounting at the Johnson Graduate School of Management. His research focuses on how biases in human behavior affect decision processes in accounting contexts. He received his PhD from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and his BA from Seattle University. At Johnson, he teaches the popular elective Managerial Accounting and Reporting.
    Kristina Rennekamp is an Associate Professor of Accounting at the Johnson Graduate School of Management. Her research examines financial accounting from a behavioral perspective, and particularly how biases affect managers' disclosure decisions and users' judgments with respect to those disclosures. She received her Masters of Science and PhD from Johnson in Accounting and earned her MBA and Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Iowa. At Johnson, she teaches the Core Financial Accounting class for the Ithaca residential MBA programs and was named one of Poets and Quants Best 40 under 40 Professors in 2017. 
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Faculty Profiles: Johnson - Ryan Guggenmos / Johnson - Kristina Rennekamp
    SSRN Research Profiles: Ryan Guggenmos / Kristina Rennekamp
    I-FOMO Paper: Mobile Devices and Investment Apps: The Effects of Information Release, Push Notification and the Fear of Missing Out (I-FOMO)
    Guggenmos Video Lecture: The Impact of Innovation and Technology on Accounting and Accounting Research
    Poets and Quants: 2017 Best 40 Under 40 Profile: Kristina Rennekamp

    • 42 min
    Putting Peer Pressure to Work | Robert Frank

    Putting Peer Pressure to Work | Robert Frank

    Robert Frank, the Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management and Professor of Economics at the Cornell Johnson Graduate School of Management, returns to Present Value to discuss his new book Under the Influence: Putting Peer Pressure to Work. The conversation explores the nature of social contagion and its numerous implications for how we approach public policy - most importantly our response to climate change. Professor Frank breaks down the mechanics of social contagion, what our regulatory approach has missed in the past, and how we can leverage knowledge of the tendency to mimic others to confront climate threats moving forward.
    For more than a decade, Professor Frank’s "Economic View" column appeared monthly in The New York Times. He received his BS in mathematics from Georgia Tech, and then taught math and science for two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural Nepal. He holds an MA in statistics and a PhD in economics, both from the University of California at Berkeley. His papers have appeared in the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, and other leading professional journals.
    His books have been translated into 23 languages, including Choosing the Right Pond, Passions Within Reason, Microeconomics and Behavior, Principles of Economics (with Ben Bernanke), Luxury Fever, What Price the Moral High Ground?, Falling Behind, The Economic Naturalist, The Darwin Economy, and Success and Luck. The Winner-Take-All Society, co-authored with Philip Cook, received a Critic's Choice Award, was named a Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times, and was included in Business Week's list of the ten best books of 1995. Frank is a co-recipient of the 2004 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. He was awarded the Johnson School's Stephen Russell Distinguished teaching award in 2004, 2010, and 2012, and its Apple Distinguished Teaching Award in 2005.
    Links from the Episode at presentvaluepodcast.com
    Book Link: Under the Influence: Putting Peer Pressure to Work (Amazon Link)
    Episode Article: Johnson Business Feed
    Profile: Robert H. Frank - Johnson 
    Twitter: @econnaturalist

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
66 Ratings

66 Ratings

Aaron M.D. ,

Fantastic Throw Back to the Classroom

Great exposure to the best and brightest of Cornell’s business school!

WApatriot ,

Throw away the script & just talk

Great guests & material hampered by a stilted host

Nick LLM ,

Great content

These podcasts have consistently delivered stellar guests, with instant rapport, and very engaging topics. Looking forward to the next episode, keep up the good work!

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