58 episodes

Harper’s Magazine, the oldest general-interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation, through long-form narrative journalism and essays, and such celebrated features as the iconic Harper’s Index. With its emphasis on fine writing and original thought Harper’s provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture. The essays, fiction, and reporting in the magazine’s pages come from promising new voices, as well as some of the most distinguished names in American letters, among them Annie Dillard, Barbara Ehrenreich, Jonathan Franzen, Mary Gaitskill, David Foster Wallace, and Tom Wolfe.

The Harper’s Podcast Harper’s Magazine

    • News

Harper’s Magazine, the oldest general-interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation, through long-form narrative journalism and essays, and such celebrated features as the iconic Harper’s Index. With its emphasis on fine writing and original thought Harper’s provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture. The essays, fiction, and reporting in the magazine’s pages come from promising new voices, as well as some of the most distinguished names in American letters, among them Annie Dillard, Barbara Ehrenreich, Jonathan Franzen, Mary Gaitskill, David Foster Wallace, and Tom Wolfe.

    Vicious Cycles

    Vicious Cycles

    “Until the news can say, ‘We have no show (or paper) today because there is nothing of significance to concern you,’ the news will build its monument to truth on a lie.” So writes Greg Jackson in “Vicious Cycles,” published in the January issue of Harper’s Magazine, an essay that looks past the transfixing plotlines of the news cycle to question the inherent limitations of the news. For Jackson, a fiction writer, the unacknowledged imperative to keep audiences engaged shapes every aspect of the news, from its sense of what’s important to the way pundits help relieve us of ideological uncertainty. As for a response to the problems the news presents us with each day, it tends to offer just one: stay tuned for more.

    In this episode, web editor Violet Lucca speaks with Jackson to discuss the work of the media theorist Neil Postman; how a “facts versus falsehoods” approach to analyzing news outlets ignores their more fundamental influence on our worldview; the difference between ideology and education; and whether culture itself can help us turn away from the noise of the attention economy.

    Read Jackson’s essay: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/01/vicious-cycles-theses-on-a-philosophy-of-news/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 32 min
    Selective Hearing

    Selective Hearing

    If you’re reading this, you already know that over the past five years both the quantity and the popularity of podcasts have exploded. Non-fiction podcasts—particularly those about true crime and history—have cultivated devoted audiences. Yet these shows are largely exempt from the standards of veracity, sourcing, and ethics to which newspapers and magazines are held. When a podcast does plagiarize or get facts wrong, this often goes unnoticed, and shows that have been caught in the act haven’t suffered a decrease in listenership.

    In this week’s episode, web editor Violet Lucca speaks with Hugh Eakin, a senior editor at The New York Review of Books and author of “Selective Hearing,” published in the February issue of Harper’s Magazine. Lucca and Eakin discuss the experiential nature of podcasts, their fan-driven culture, and the limits of fact-checking.

    Read Eakin’s review: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/02/selective-hearing-specious-history-in-new-podcasts/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 42 min
    “My Gang Is Jesus”

    “My Gang Is Jesus”

    Evangelical churches in Brazil’s favelas serve as a source of redemption for many, and there are many pastors who work earnestly to save the souls of gang members, whose numbers have grown significantly in recent years. Yet some pastors in Rio de Janeiro have become entangled in violence, the drug trade, political corruption, and the exploitation of Brazil’s poor. Complicating the issue of faith further, conversion allows gang members a path to safely exit a world of violent crime—something that might be more pressing than spiritual salvation.

    In this episode, Alex Cuadros, author of the book Brazillionaires and the article “‘My Gang is Jesus,’” featured in the February issue of Harper’s Magazine—explains how these narratives coexist in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. In his conversation with web editor Violet Lucca, Cuadros discusses the politics of evangelicalism, tensions between evangelicalism and Afro-Brazilian religions, and other factors that have contributed to the spiral of violence in Brazil.

    Read Cuadros’s story: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/02/my-gang-is-jesus-brazilian-evangelicals/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 48 min
    Trumpism After Trump

    Trumpism After Trump

    Whether Donald Trump wins or loses the upcoming presidential election, the shift in Republican values he has ushered in is sure to outlast him. What aspects of Trump’s legacy will the next generation of conservatism cling to, and under whose leadership? In July, historian and writer Thomas Meaney braved the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, D.C., for the inaugural National Conservatism Conference, where a diverse group of pundits and thinkers of the nationalist right gathered to argue these questions, hoping to extract a winning ideology from the jumble of recent history; his report is the cover story for Harper’s Magazine’s February issue. Amid speeches by futurist tech entrepreneur Peter Thiel, talk-show host Tucker Carlson, and former national security advisor John Bolton, Meaney depicts an exuberant and contradictory scene, bound together less by a specific platform—for now, at least—than by a common enemy, the “cosmopolitan” liberal elite.

    In this episode, web editor Violet Lucca speaks with Thomas Meaney about the resuscitation of the right-wing political theories of James Burnham, the degree of relation between national conservatism and white nationalism, and why an event like the National Conservatism Conference might be the best place to read the future of the movement.

    Read Meaney’s story here: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/02/trumpism-after-trump/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 39 min
    Oceans Apart

    Oceans Apart

    The Comoro Islands, an archipelago off the eastern coast of Africa, offers a glimpse into the future of the global climate crisis. After the islands’ natural resources were depleted, the local economy failed—except on the island Mayotte, which is an overseas department of France. In search of an escape, citizens of the independent Union of the Comoros embark on a potentially fatal journey to Mayotte on tiny fiberglass boats. Unable to work and forever evading French authorities, these migrants’ lives are only marginally improved; asylum seekers from African and Middle Eastern nations who have made it to Mayotte find themselves in a similarly dire position.

    In this week’s episode, host Violet Lucca speaks with the British journalist and photographer Tommy Trenchard, the author of an article about this ongoing crisis that was published in the January issue of Harper’s Magazine. Their discussion explores how this environmental and economic devastation is likely irreversible, and how the emphasis on security has only made the situation worse.

    Read Trenchard’s story: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/01/oceans-apart-comoro-islands-migrant-crisis/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 43 min
    Click Here To Kill

    Click Here To Kill

    In July 2018, local police informed Alexis Stern, a recent high school graduate in Big Lake, Minnesota, that there was reason to believe someone wanted her dead. A hit had been requested, for a little over $5,000 in bitcoin, through a website called Camorra Hitmen, a dark-web market advertising gun-for-hire services to anonymous buyers. As it turned out, the site was a scam operation, designed to lure credulous buyers into paying for an act that wouldn’t really be carried out. But for Stern—whose case remains largely unaddressed by police investigators even now—that fact has never been all that reassuring.

    Stern’s story, and the story of the white-hat hacker who spends his off-hours battling and exposing these assassination markets, is the subject of Harper’s Magazine’s January cover story, an investigative report by writer and journalist Brian Merchant. In this episode of the Harper’s Podcast, host and web editor Violet Lucca speaks with Merchant about the deep ambiguity of online assassination requests, what it’s like to come face to face with the disinhibition effect, and the frustrating slowness of police agencies to apprehend this new form of crime.

    Read Merchant’s story here: https://harpers.org/archive/2020/01/click-here-to-kill-dark-web-hitman/

    This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

schmidtyNIDAHONOHICK ,

Dude...

I’m dope my ace...aka:STRETCH....

-Les Couchon- 💄🐷👠🍒

Olivia💗🌃 ,

Hire a sound person

Have loved the magazine since who knows when. Nothing better for a plane ride. But the podcast sound quality is so bad I wouldn’t be able to hear on a plane to save my life. Can’t hear at the gym, on the bus or even walking outside. When I give up and put on another podcast it blows my ears out because I forgot I had turned Harper’s all the way up to no avail. Maybe the content is great. I have no idea because I can’t hear!

wmbrainiac ,

Ahhhh

People still read books and talk about ideas.
What a balm.

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