156 episodes

The Capitalist Investor ties together relevant items that influence the stock market and your investments – from economics to politics to earnings to planning strategies. We cover all the bases. Ask us questions at info@swpconnect.com. You can also reach out to Mark Tepper on Twitter - @MarkTepperSWP

The Capitalist Investor with Mark Tepper Mark Tepper

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 85 Ratings

The Capitalist Investor ties together relevant items that influence the stock market and your investments – from economics to politics to earnings to planning strategies. We cover all the bases. Ask us questions at info@swpconnect.com. You can also reach out to Mark Tepper on Twitter - @MarkTepperSWP

    The One Where They Discuss Alternative Investments: Oil, Real Estate, and Private Equity...and Cocaine Bear.

    The One Where They Discuss Alternative Investments: Oil, Real Estate, and Private Equity...and Cocaine Bear.

    The Producers Price index (PPI) is a measure of inflation for manufacturers. It is coming out this week and is expected to be high. How high (or low) it reads, could move the markets. The PPI is the best way to explain how much it costs manufacturers to make things. 

    This could possibly mean that inflation is not increasing as rapidly as previously thought, which could be seen as a positive by investors. However, it is still unclear how Federal Reserve Chairman Powell will interpret this data.

    The gang digs into real estate and the recent headlines surrounding some nontraded REIT's decision to limit withdrawals. For a variety of reasons, investors have begun to withdraw money from Blackstone Real Estate and Private Lending funds. We discuss the implications.

    We also discuss the recent stock market sell-off and how it may be due to concerns about China's economy. We discuss oil prices, energy stocks and some contradictory data points, which create some uncertainty about a possible recession. 

    The gang chats about China's recent decision to ease some restrictions and the causes: protests or the state of the Chinese economy? Tony, Derek, and Ryan discuss the different viewpoints on China, then get into the good stuff: the lack of diversity during Shark Week and the impending smash-hit blockbuster, Cocaine Bear.
    Timestamps
    0:00:07
    The Capitalist Investor: PPI, Georgia Runoff Election, and Real Estate Funds
    0:02:06
    Inflation in the United States
    0:03:39
    Oil Prices and the Economy: A Conversation
    0:06:20
    The Impact of China's Economy on Global Markets
    0:07:51
    The Impact of the Georgia Runoff Elections on the Stock Market
    0:09:42
    Blackstone Private Placements and the Coronavirus
    0:11:26
    The Impact of Rising Interest Rates on Real Estate
    0:14:56
    Bereaved Properties and the Real Estate Market
    0:16:49
    The Impact of Legalized Gambling on the Casino Industry
    0:18:15
    The Discovery Channel's Shark Week is under fire for its lack of diversity and overrepresentation of men named Mike.
    0:20:45
    Cocaine Bear and Shark Week: A Conversation

    • 24 min
    Record Holiday Sales & Impact On Your Portfolio, China Zero-Covid Policy , Ep. #155

    Record Holiday Sales & Impact On Your Portfolio, China Zero-Covid Policy , Ep. #155

    Despite warning signs, Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales still break records.

    The group discusses Black Friday shopping and whether it is bigger than Cyber Monday. They mention that while the sales were up when inflation is taken into account, there was no real progress made. The speakers discuss the market and Black Friday and mention that the rail strike and protests in China are having negative impacts on the economy.

    The speakers discuss the possibility of an upcoming recession, citing several indicators that suggest it may be on the horizon. These include the recent inversion of the yield curve, the decreasing price of oil, and banks' unwillingness to loan money. They also note that the White House has started to take steps to prepare for a recession, such as replenishing the oil reserves.

    Are Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales, and whether or not they are indicative of a strong economy? The group discusses how businesses and employees are impacted by a weak economy, and how the recent sales numbers may not be as strong as they seem.

    0:01:51
    The Market This Week: A Look at Black Friday and Earnings Season
    0:03:31
    The Impact of Economic Indicators on the Federal Reserve's Decision-making
    0:05:28
    The Impact of the Resilient Consumer on Businesses
    0:07:29
    The Impact of Black Friday and Cyber Monday on the Economy
    0:10:20
    The Impact of Economic Uncertainty on the Stock Market
    0:12:34
    The Impact of High Consumer Debt on the Economy
    0:13:58
    The Impact of the Railroad Strikes on the Stock Market
    0:15:27
    The Impact of a Potential Railroad Strike on the U.S. Economy
    0:23:38
    The Impact of China Lockdowns on the Stock Market
    0:25:15
    Apple and Twitter's Feud Could Impact the Stock Market
    0:28:56
    Apple and Tesla's Feud: Why Elon Musk is Picking a Fight

    • 32 min
    Santa Claus Is (Isn't) Coming To Town & Iger Back At Disney, Ep. #154

    Santa Claus Is (Isn't) Coming To Town & Iger Back At Disney, Ep. #154

    Welcome back to this week's episode of The Capitalist Investor! The group discusses Diamond Hands D's recent vacation, during which time the crypto market collapsed. On top of the crypto collapse, a recent statistic shows that personal savings in the US has decreased from $2 trillion to $600 billion in the last year. This could be due to increased spending, and that could lead to increased personal debt in the future. The Santa Claus rally may not be real or long-lasting, due to the high levels of credit card debt among Americans. There is currently 16.5 Trillion dollars in household debt and over 31 Trillion dollars in government debt. Has the Santa Claus rally already happened this year? Is the Santa Claus rally going to be able to hold? What’s going to happen over at Disney with Bob Iger coming back as CEO? All of this and more is discussed in this week’s “The Capitalist Investor”.

    The Santa Claus rally, a stock market phenomenon that typically occurs in the seven days after Christmas. They note that this year, the rally may be occurring earlier than usual, and that it is generally driven by positive sentiment and increased consumer spending around the holidays. They also discuss the possibility that the rally may be extended into January, due to the recent strong performance of the stock market. One of the reasons the stock market does well during the holiday season is that retail investors are more optimistic during this time and there is less trading by institutional investors. But less trading means less volume, which usually doesn't support a strong move.

    Bob Iger is back at Disney as CEO. Disney has become very "woke" over the past few years and Iger coming back to Disney raises questions on the direction of their "wokeness". Will Disney double down on being woke? Or will Iger come into Disney and walk back what they did over the past couple of years?
    0:04:19
    The Santa Claus Rally: What to Expect
    0:09:18
    The Impact of Cryptocurrency on the Stock Market
    0:10:54
    The Impact of Bitcoin Mining on the Crypto Market
    0:17:38
    The Walt Disney Company's Plans to Leave Florida?
    0:22:53
    The Impact of Wokeness on Disney's Business Model
    0:25:26
    The Future of Disney Under Bob Iger
    0:28:14
    The Scammy Business of Ticketmaster: A Conversation
    0:29:54
    Celebrities and Ticketmaster: A Scam?
    0:33:09
    The Impact of Live Nation's Monopoly on the Music Industry

    • 39 min
    Trump Announces 2024 Campaign, Crypto Contagion & The FTX Blow Up, Ep. #153

    Trump Announces 2024 Campaign, Crypto Contagion & The FTX Blow Up, Ep. #153

    What's going on with the recent crypto meltdown and specifically the FTX exchange? The traditional banking system works in a similar way, lending out assets to make money for themselves. What is to blame? The banks? The exchanges? Regulation? Or is this a culprit of low-interest rates and the changes in behavioral finance?

    In the traditional banking system, banks will take customer deposits and use them to invest in other products or services. However, this can be risky if the bank does not have enough liquid assets to meet customer demands for withdrawals. This is what happened with the crypto exchange FTX. The company had leveraged it's customer assets to make other investments, but when the market crashed and customers tried to withdraw their money, FTX was unable to meet these demands. This caused the company to collapse, wiping out billions of dollars in assets.

    The FTX crisis was caused by the company's use of client money for risky hedge fund leverage, which left the company unable to repay its debt obligations when clients began asking for their money back. But on top of that, it is absolutely possible that Fraud has occured, but we don't want to jump to conclusions until it is proven.

    The person who hacked into FTX's system is now the 35th largest owner of Ethereum in the world. This hack is a reminder that the banking system is vulnerable to attack and that companies need to be careful about over-leveraging themselves.
    The Crypto Meltdown: What Really Happened - 0:01:45
    The FTX Cryptocurrency Exchange Scandal - 0:03:34
    FTX Exchange Under Fire After Client Money Goes Missing - 0:07:17
    The FTX hack and its implications for the cryptocurrency industry - 0:08:39
    The Aftermath of the Largest Ponzi Scheme in History: The Bernard Madoff Scandal - 0:10:08
    The Decentralized Finance Community's Relationship with Regulation - 0:13:32
    Inflation: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly - 0:19:13
    The Impact of PPI on the Economy - 0:22:35
    The Federal Reserve's Impact on Inflation and the Market - 0:25:19

    Excesses Will Change in the Next Two Years - 0:31:00

    • 34 min
    Mid-Term Red Wave Turned Into Pink Puddle, Ep. #152

    Mid-Term Red Wave Turned Into Pink Puddle, Ep. #152

    Well.. the Mid-Term Red Wave wasn't really the Red Wave that many people expected. But the big question and observation is forecasting what this means for 2024 and your money. Does this shed some light into the future? What will be the impact on the economy & stock market? Also, we just head of major layoffs by big technology companies. What does that mean for unemployment as we head into 2023? And of course.. you can't forget about what's cancelled this week.
    ●  [01:34] Mid-Term Red Wave Turned into Pink Puddle
    ●  [19:43] Big Tech Layoffs
    ●  [30:45] Cancelled! Kathy Griffin & COVID

    • 37 min
    There Isn't a Blue Check Next to Biden's Tax Plan for Oil, Ep. #151

    There Isn't a Blue Check Next to Biden's Tax Plan for Oil, Ep. #151

    1. Twitter is introducing a subscription model for verified users
    Twitter is introducing a subscription model for verified users. This means that users who have a blue check mark next to their name will have to pay a monthly fee in order to maintain their verified status. The exact amount has not been determined yet, but it is rumored to be around $8 per month. This is a controversial move, as many people feel that verified users should not have to pay for their status. However, Twitter is hoping that this will generate more revenue and help to cut out some of the riff-raff from the platform.

    This move by Twitter is sure to generate a lot of debate. Some people feel that verified users should not have to pay for their status, while others think that this could help to clean up the platform. Only time will tell how this new subscription model will affect Twitter.

    2. Biden is introducing a plan to tax oil companies
    Biden's plan to tax oil companies is based on the premise that they are making excess profits and that this tax will incentivize them to lower prices for consumers. However, there are many flaws with this plan. First, it is unclear how the government will determine what is considered an "excess" profit. Second, even if the tax is implemented, there is no guarantee that oil companies will actually lower prices. In fact, it is more likely that they will simply pass the cost of the tax on to consumers through higher prices. Finally, the tax will only further incentivize oil companies to move away from traditional fossil fuels and towards cleaner energy sources.

    It is also worth noting that this tax will likely have a disproportionate impact on small businesses and consumers in rural areas. This is because they are more likely to rely on oil for heating and transportation, and will thus be hit harder by any price increases. In addition, the tax could lead to job losses in the oil industry, which would further harm the economy. Overall, Biden's plan to tax oil companies is misguided and is unlikely to achieve its desired effect. It would be better to focus on other methods of incentivizing oil companies to move towards cleaner energy sources, such as investing in renewable energy research and development.

    3. The price of oil is determined by global supply and demand
    undefined - The government is going to take an average of the cost of oil from 2015 to 2019, and if any oil company exceeds that average, it will be taxed at a higher rate. This is supposed to incentivize oil companies to lower prices at the pump, but it is unclear how this will actually be implemented or enforced.

    The government's plan to tax oil companies that exceed the average price of oil from 2015 to 2019 is a step in the right direction, but it is unclear how this will actually be implemented or enforced. There needs to be more transparency and communication between the government and the oil companies in order to make this plan effective. Otherwise, it could end up being nothing more than a political ploy to score points with the public.

    This week's episode of the Capitalist Investor:
    [00:00:03] - This week's episode of The Capitalist Investor features three of the Dream Team members.

    [00:00:23] - They're going to go to a subscription model for the blue check marks. Twitter wants to charge $20 a month to be verified, but it settled at $8.

    [00:10:29] - Biden proposes a tax on oil companies to lower gas prices.

    [00:16:07] - The other positive catalysts are good earnings, good geopolitical, and a sudden peace.

    [00:23:13] - Jim Cramer covered every stock in the S&P 500 over the last several years.

    [00:25:37] - This week's Canceled Segment is Luke Bryan inviting Ron Dee and Ron DeSantis, the governor of Florida, on stage in support of the hurricane relief effort.

    [00:29:09] - Guys talk a little about Brown

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
85 Ratings

85 Ratings

Mr. Movie ,

Great, informative and simple.

This is really fun listen. It’s very accessible and such an easy listen.

PF216 ,

Episode. 117 - Dumpster Diving discuss Moats and Inflation Insulation

Look forward to this podcast weekly! On episode 117, these stocks are beaten down for a reason. Next time discuss how companies have a most and pricing power to combat inflation eating away EBIT.

Belnda2256 ,

Mom

Love the informal nature of current events tied loosely to finance. I tell my math students constantly - money matters - look for it in every aspect of your lives. You are slowly shaping conservative views in a modest way. Future topics: economic effect of primarily producing, manufacturing or selling made in America products. Can it be done? I wonder what patriotism would look like if we really tried. How can we use our alliance relations to boost our own economy? How can religion fit into finance - or doesn’t it matter. I think it does. Is there any merit to stock clubs informally? Are penny stocks still a thing? Are they fair game? Stop me. Lol

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