18 episodes

The podcast from the History of Education Society UK features interviews, ideas, thought-provoking discussions, collaborations, and publications from across the field of the history of education and beyond.

History of Education Society UK Podcast History of Education Society UK

    • History

The podcast from the History of Education Society UK features interviews, ideas, thought-provoking discussions, collaborations, and publications from across the field of the history of education and beyond.

    2.12 - Performance Nineteenth Century Jesuit Schools with Michael Zampelli, SJ

    2.12 - Performance Nineteenth Century Jesuit Schools with Michael Zampelli, SJ

    We’re back today with our second of three episodes looking at the performing arts in education. In this episode, we move forward to the nineteenth century to look at theatre in Jesuit schools in the United States. 
    My guest this week, who will walk us through this history, is Michael Zampelli, SJ. Michael is a theatre director and historian at Fordham University, where he also directs the MA Philosophy and Society . His research interests include gender and sexuality in performance, antitheatricality, Jesuit performance history - his recent work has focused on the Jesuit performance tradition in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States. Alongside his research work, he has directed productions of several Jesuit-inspired pieces from the early modern period.
    A transcript of the episode is available at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.

    • 40 min
    2.11 - Performance in Early Modern Schools with Amanda Eubanks Winkler

    2.11 - Performance in Early Modern Schools with Amanda Eubanks Winkler

    For our next few episodes, we’re going to turn to performance and look at how music, theatre and dance have intersected with education in the past. Our stop will be in early modern England, where Dr Amanda Eubanks Winkler will be our guide to performance in the schoolroom. 
    Amanda is a historian of English music in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and twentieth centuries at Syracuse University. Her research interests include the relationship among musical, spiritual, and bodily disorder; performance and pedagogy; and the intersection of music and politics. Her most recent book, Music, Dance, and Drama in Early Modern English Schools, touches on a number of these topics. 
    A transcript of the episode is available at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.

    Sources

    Music, Dance, and Drama in Early Modern English Schools by Amanda Eubanks Winkler  
    Shakespeare in the Theatre: Sir William Davenant and the Duke’s Company by Amanda Eubanks Winkler and Richard Schoch
    ‘Opera at School: Mapping the Cultural Geography of Schoolgirl Performance’ by Amanda Eubanks Winkler, in Operatic Georgraphies: The Place of Opera and the Opera House, edited by Suzanne Aspden

    • 33 min
    2.10 - Time and Community in Medieval Schools with Sarah Lynch

    2.10 - Time and Community in Medieval Schools with Sarah Lynch

    We're excited to share a special guest episode today from our colleagues at HEQ&A, the official podcast of History of Education Quarterly. They have an outstanding archive of episodes, but given the interdisciplinary focus of this season, today I thought we’d share an interview they did with Sarah Lynch, where she discusses her most recent article, Marking Time: Making Community in Medieval Schools. Her work embraces methods from sociology and anthropology and is a really interesting look at the temporal frameworks of education.

    Dr Sarah Lynch is a historian of medieval education in France, focusing on the socio-economic context of schools, pupils, and teachers, as well as the significance of such instruction within local cultures and communities. Her research revolves around elementary and grammar education in the medieval world and her current projects centre on educational legacies in late-medieval French wills, education in the global Middle Ages, and the medieval year.

    A transcript of the episode is available at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.

    • 17 min
    2.9 - The history of knowledge with Tamson Pietsch and Joel Barnes (Replay)

    2.9 - The history of knowledge with Tamson Pietsch and Joel Barnes (Replay)

    I'm taking a few weeks off this summer to work on my dissertation, so instead of new episodes we'll be sharing some of our favorite interviews from the archive. We'll also have some guest episodes from other history of education podcasts.

    In today's episode, Bethany White speaks to Dr. Tamson Pietsch and Dr. Joel Barnes about their work on the connections - and tensions - between the fields of the history of knowledge and the history of education. We discuss how the focus and methods of the history of knowledge can help us think through how knowledge is produced and legitimated; understand the role of institutions; and develop our perspectives on post-colonial and indigenous knowledges.

    Tamson Pietsch is Associate Professor in Social and Political Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney and Director of the Australian Centre for Public History.  Joel Barnes is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland.

    A transcript of the episode is available upon request at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.

    • 29 min
    2.8 - International Education in Australia with Anna Kent

    2.8 - International Education in Australia with Anna Kent

    Continuing our exploration of international student experiences, this episode we move to the other side of the world and examine the experience of overseas students in Australia. Beginning in 1948, Australia offered a number of different scholarship programmes targeted at students from Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. 
    To guide us through the soup of acronyms and ‘schemes’ is Dr Anna Kent. Anna is a historian of education currently tutoring at Deakin University whose research focuses on international education policy in Australia. Her research looks at the intersections of international education and broader themes like race, decolonisation, and global movement. Prior to graduate school, Anna spent a decade working in policy and management roles in international education.
    A transcript of the episode is available at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.

    Sources 
    International education is not just important for universities, it has shaped our nation by Anna Kent
    What do Australians know about international education in Australia? by Anna Kent
    Sponsored Students and the Rise of “the International” in Australian Communities by Anna Kent & David Lowe

    • 21 min
    2.7 - Differential Fees for Overseas Students with Jodi Burkett

    2.7 - Differential Fees for Overseas Students with Jodi Burkett

    The half a million international students studying in the UK are heirs to a complex legacy of overseas students studying in Britain. From medieval scholars traveling between Oxford and Paris, medical students traveling to Edinburgh, Indian students coming over in the late 19th century, or Chinese students studying in London today – politics and education combine in these students studying away from home. One moment that is particularly important for international students occurred in 1966-67, when the British government began charging different fees for overseas students than for home students.
    Today we discuss that change and the student protests that came with it. Our guide is Dr Jodi Burkett, social and cultural historian of late twentieth century Britain and a Senior Lecturer at the University of Portsmouth. Her research looks at the cultural and social impacts of the end of the British Empire, with a particular focus on national movements like the National Union of Students. Her recent chapter - Boundaries of Belonging: differential fees for overseas students, c. 1967 - touches on a number of important questions about race, national identity, and student politics and how these intersected with the overseas fee hike.

    A transcript of the episode is available at the History of Education Society website, along with more information about our events, publications and conferences. You can follow the History of Education Society UK on Twitter and keep up-to-date with the latest research in The History of Education journal.
    Sources 
    Boundaries of Belonging: differential fees for overseas students, c. 1967 in The break-up of Greater Britain by Jodi Burkett
    Revolutionary vanguard or agent provocateur: students and the far left on English university campuses c.1970–90 by Jodi Burkett

    • 31 min

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