30 episodes

Collaborative product of the USDA Southwest Climate Hub and the DOI Southwest Climate Adaptation Science Center. We highlight stories to share the most recent advances in climate science, weather and climate adaptation, and innovative practices to support resilient landscapes and communities. We believe that sharing forward thinking and creative climate science and adaptation will strengthen our collective ability to respond to even the most challenging impacts of climate change in one of the hottest and driest regions of the world. New episodes on the first Wednesday of each month. Sign up for email alerts and never miss an episode: http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H. Funding for the podcast comes from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded Sustainable Southwest Beef Project.

Come Rain or Shine USDA Southwest Climate Hub & DOI Southwest Climate Adaptation Science Center

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 3 Ratings

Collaborative product of the USDA Southwest Climate Hub and the DOI Southwest Climate Adaptation Science Center. We highlight stories to share the most recent advances in climate science, weather and climate adaptation, and innovative practices to support resilient landscapes and communities. We believe that sharing forward thinking and creative climate science and adaptation will strengthen our collective ability to respond to even the most challenging impacts of climate change in one of the hottest and driest regions of the world. New episodes on the first Wednesday of each month. Sign up for email alerts and never miss an episode: http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H. Funding for the podcast comes from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded Sustainable Southwest Beef Project.

    Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability of Navajo Nation Forests

    Assessing Climate Change Vulnerability of Navajo Nation Forests

    Warming temperatures can exacerbate forest drought stress, reducing defenses to bark beetle outbreaks, wildfire, and tree diseases. Concern about losses within the forests of the Navajo Nation due to these stressors led to a partnership between the Navajo Forestry Department and a diverse group of scientists to assess the vulnerability of Navajo forests to climate change and develop strategies to promote forest resilience to drought and extreme fire behavior. Here we speak with Principal Investigator Dr. Margaret Evans, and forestry consultant Jaime Yazzie, to learn more about this project.


    Relevant Links:
    Forest Monitoring and Tree Ring Data to Inform Forest Management on the Navajo Nation
    CASC Project Explorer: Forest Monitoring and Tree Ring Data to Inform Forest Management on the Navajo Nation 
    Building Authentic Collaborations With Tribal Communities: A Living Reference for Climate Practitioners

    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!
    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!
    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 48 min
    Behind the Scenes of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

    Behind the Scenes of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

    Dr. Carolyn Enquist and Dr. Dave Gutzler discuss the making of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report, particularly the Working Group II section that presents an assessment of the impacts of, and vulnerabilities and adaptations to, climate change, of which both were authors. They share with us the scope and purpose of the report, applicability for resource managers and other decision-makers, what some of the terminology means, and more. Please note - this podcast episode is NOT a summary of the sixth assessment report’s findings. If you are interested in a quick summary of the findings, we encourage you to check out the FAQ documents linked below.
    Relevant Links:
    IPCC website: https://www.ipcc.ch/ 
    Working Group I Fact Sheets
    Working Group II Fact Sheets
    Working Group II FAQs documents

    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!
    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!
    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 43 min
    Assessing Risk When Relocating Species

    Assessing Risk When Relocating Species

    Continuing our series on managing for ecosystem transformation, we sit down with Dr. Mark Schwartz, a plant ecologist at UC Davis, and Aviv Karasov-Olson, a PhD candidate at UC Davis, to discuss a new tool for assessing the biotic risks associated with a managed relocation project (also referred to as assisted migration). Managed relocation is the act of deliberately relocating, or translocating, a species outside of its historic range to meet conservation goals, especially in response to climate change. Image credit: USFWS Midwest Region.

    Relevant links:
    National Park Service: Managed Relocation (Includes links to both the report and the worksheet described in this episode)
    Karasov‐Olson, Aviv, et al. "Co‐development of a risk assessment strategy for managed relocation." Ecological Solutions and Evidence 2.3 (2021): e12092.



    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!


    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!


    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 42 min
    Managing for Change: California’s Giant Sequoias

    Managing for Change: California’s Giant Sequoias

    How are extreme events transforming sequoia forests in the western US.? And what are land managers doing about it? Dr. Christy Brigham, Chief of Resources Management and Science at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and Dr. Joanna Nelson, Director of science and conservation planning with Save the Redwoods League, visited with us to share their knowledge and experiences working to conserve these iconic trees. Image credit: Pixabay

    Relevant links:
    Sequoia and Kings Canyon - National Park Service
    Save the Redwoods League
    Giant Sequoia Lands Coalition
    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!
    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!


    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 35 min
    Forest Transformation in the Southwest

    Forest Transformation in the Southwest

    Impacts from rapid climate change are challenging traditional land & wildlife management strategies that were based on a stable baseline condition. In some locations we are already observing early-stage ecosystem reorganization in response to historic land management practices combined with recent novel climate stresses. Dr. Craig Allen and Dr. Nate Stephenson discuss how the convergence of climate stress, human land use patterns and histories, and disturbance trends in the southwestern United States are leading to forest ecosystem changes and transformation. Image source: Pixabay.

    Papers mentioned during the interview:
    Allen, C.D., Macalady, A.K., Chenchouni, H., Bachelet, D., McDowell, N., Vennetier, M., Kitzberger, T., Rigling, A., Breshears, D.D., Hogg, E.T. and Gonzalez, P., 2010. A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests. Forest ecology and management, 259(4), pp.660-684.
    Janzen, D., 1998. Gardenification of wildland nature and the human footprint. Science, 279(5355), pp.1312-1313.
    Millar, C.I., Stephenson, N.L. and Stephens, S.L., 2007. Climate change and forests of the future: managing in the face of uncertainty. Ecological applications, 17(8), pp.2145-2151.
    Milly, P.C., Betancourt, J., Falkenmark, M., Hirsch, R.M., Kundzewicz, Z.W., Lettenmaier, D.P. and Stouffer, R.J., 2008. Stationarity is dead: whither water management?. Science, 319(5863), pp.573-574.
    Bioscience. January 2022 Issue (RAD spotlight)


    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!
    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!


    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 58 min
    Sustainability In Beef Supply Chains

    Sustainability In Beef Supply Chains

    A discussion around sustainability challenges and opportunities within the U.S. beef supply chain. Our guest for this episode is Dr. Sheri Spiegal, a rangeland scientist with the Jornada Experimental Range and Co-PI of the Sustainable Southwest Beef Project. Dr. Spiegal shares insights with us from her ongoing research on beef supply chains, trade offs, and producing “socially acceptable beef”.

    Relevant links and resources:
    August 1st, 2020 episode (for background info): The Sustainable Southwest Beef Project
    The Sustainable Southwest Beef Project website: https://southwestbeef.org/ 


    If you’re enjoying this podcast, please consider rating us and/or leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts, Podcast Addict, or Podchaser Thanks!
    Follow us on Twitter @RainShinePod
    Never miss an episode! Sign up to get an email alert whenever a new episode publishes (http://eepurl.com/hRuJ5H)
    Have a suggestion for a future episode? Please tell us!


    Come Rain or Shine affiliate links:
    DOI Southwest CASC: https://www.swcasc.arizona.edu/
    USDA Southwest Climate Hub: https://www.climatehubs.usda.gov/hubs/southwest
    Sustainable Southwest Beef Project: https://southwestbeef.org/

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

EnerSanctum ,

Great, but…I have a beef

I really love this show and usually find it fantastic and informative. I love the energy of the hosts and feel like they each bring strengths to the show and interviews. I’d give this a solid five stars except for one major concern — I can’t help but cringe every time they go on and on about “sustainable” beef practices in the Southwest. That’s like talking about “clean coal.” It just doesn’t make sense from an environmental perspective. There’s just no way to make cows in the desert sustainable because the desert can’t sustain whole herds of energy-intensive animals. That’s just a fact. Otherwise the desert would have already had large herbivores walking around before we brought them here. The last episode they interviewed someone from the beef project who actually downplayed the science, while at the same time advocating for having cows start here and then get shipped to another state where grass grows. As if there’s anything even remotely “sustainable” in that equation! And the host just acted like that was a viable solution, even though the guest was clearly stretching the idea thinly. It just felt like the show was pandering to some corporate sponsor or something, and I had to take a break for a while. I think it harms the credibility of the show and their other guests when they don’t address these incongruencias or ask any tough questions when someone literally says the data don’t match their projections. BUT if you disregard those episodes (and there are quite a few of them), this is a great show. The Katharine Hayhoe episode was especially amazing. So, I do love the show, but I have a beef with all the beef.

rrjaunty ,

Fun and informative!

I’m already learning a lot from this podcast. Keep
up the good work!

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