998 episodes

The Lawfare Podcast features discussions with experts, policymakers, and opinion leaders at the nexus of national security, law, and policy. On issues from foreign policy, homeland security, intelligence, and cybersecurity to governance and law, we have doubled down on seriousness at a time when others are running away from it. Visit us at www.lawfareblog.com.
Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast The Lawfare Institute

    • Government
    • 4.8 • 5.4K Ratings

The Lawfare Podcast features discussions with experts, policymakers, and opinion leaders at the nexus of national security, law, and policy. On issues from foreign policy, homeland security, intelligence, and cybersecurity to governance and law, we have doubled down on seriousness at a time when others are running away from it. Visit us at www.lawfareblog.com.
Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Inside the Facebook Files

    Inside the Facebook Files

    Today, we’re bringing you another episode of Arbiters of Truth, our series on the online information ecosystem. We’ll be talking about “The Facebook Files”—a series of stories by the Wall Street Journal about Facebook’s failures to mitigate harms on its platform. There’s a lot of critical reporting about Facebook out there, but what makes the Journal’s series different is that it’s based on documents from within the company itself—memos from Facebook researchers, identifying problems based on hard data, proposing solutions that Facebook leadership then fails or refuses to implement and contradicts in public statements. One memo literally says, “We are not actually doing what we say we do publicly.”
    To discuss the Journal’s reporting, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Jeff Horwitz, a technology reporter at the paper who obtained the leaked documents and led the team reporting the Facebook Files. What was it like working on the series? What's his response to Facebook's pushback? And why is there so much discontent within the company?
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 47 min
    What's Up at Congress with Quinta Jurecic and Molly Reynolds

    What's Up at Congress with Quinta Jurecic and Molly Reynolds

    Congress, which has been on recess for the month of August, has a lot on its plate. The January 6 committee is starting to receive information, and it has gone into stealth mode. If Congress doesn't get its act together, the government is going to shut down and we're going to default on the federal debt. And there's actually been some oversight hearings recently. We decided to check in on it all with Molly Reynolds and Quinta Jurecic, both of the Brookings Institution and both senior editors at Lawfare. They joined Benjamin Wittes to talk about what Congress has been doing, what's coming down the pike and if we are headed toward disaster.
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 41 min
    Milley, Trump and Civil-Military Relations with Peter Feaver, Kori Schake and Alexander Vindman

    Milley, Trump and Civil-Military Relations with Peter Feaver, Kori Schake and Alexander Vindman

    A new book by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa contains reporting about several controversial actions by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley in late 2000 and early 2021, regarding conversations with his Chinese counterparts, his discussion with senior military officers about following standard nuclear procedures (if need be), and reaching out to others like the CIA and NSA directors to remind them to watch everything closely. Were each of these reported actions proper for a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and why? And what about all of this coming out in books? 
    To talk through it all, David Priess sat down with an A-team on civil-military relations. Peter Feaver is a civil-military relations expert at Duke University and director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies. He served in National Security Council staff positions in both the Bill Clinton and the George W. Bush administrations. Kori Schake is the director of foreign and defense policy at the American Enterprise Institute who has worked in the Joint Staff J5, in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and in the National Security Council’s staff, as well as the State Department's policy planning staff during Bush 43’s administration. She has also researched and written extensively on civil-military relations. And Alex Vindman is Lawfare’s Pritzker Military Fellow and a visiting fellow at Perry World House. His government experience includes multiple U.S. Army assignments, time inside the office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and in the National Security Council staff.
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 58 min
    Seth Stoughton on the Shooting of Ashli Babbitt

    Seth Stoughton on the Shooting of Ashli Babbitt

    On January 6, a mob of pro-Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol during the certification of the Electoral College vote. As lawmakers were being evacuated by Capitol police, Ashli Babbitt, a 35-year-old Air Force veteran, tried to climb through a shattered window in a barricaded door. Capitol Police Lt. Michael Byrd shot Babbitt as she was climbing through the window and Babbitt died later that day. In the polarized debate over January 6, the death of Ashli Babbitt has become a focal point and one of unusual political valence. Many on the right view her as a martyred hero and the police officer that shot her as an example of excessive force. Those on the left, who have traditionally been outspoken about police killings, have largely stayed quiet. To the extent they've commented, it's been to emphasize the unique circumstances of the Capitol insurrection as justification for the use of lethal force. The Department of Justice, having reviewed the incident, determined that there was insufficient evidence to charge Officer Byrd with violating Babbitt's civil rights, although DOJ did not conclude one way or the other, whether the shooting was justified under the Fourth Amendment.
    To work through the legal issues around the shooting of Ashli Babbitt, Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Seth Stoughton, associate professor of law at the University of South Carolina and the coauthor of a recent Lawfare post on the shooting. Stoughton is a nationally recognized expert on police use of force. A former police officer himself, he was a key witness for the murder prosecution of Derek Chauvin, the police officer who killed George Floyd. Alan spoke with Stoughton about the murky factual records surrounding the Babbitt shooting, the complex constitutional and statutory issues that it raises and what its political effects say about the broader prospects for police reform.
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Lawfare Archive: Defending an Unowned Internet

    Lawfare Archive: Defending an Unowned Internet

    A discussion at the Berkman Center: In the wake of the disclosures about government surveillance and the rise of corporate-run applications and protocols, is the idea of an “unowned” Internet still a credible one? The Berkman Center’s Jonathan Zittrain moderates a panel, incluing Yochai Benkler (Harvard Law School), Ebele Okobi (Yahoo!), Bruce Schneier (CO3 Systames), and Benjamin Wittes (Brookings Institution) to explore surveillance, and the potential for reforms in policy, technology, and corporate and consumer behavior.
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 38 min
    Lawfare Archive: Benjamin Wittes Gives a Talk at Parliament on Whether Drones are the New Guantanamo

    Lawfare Archive: Benjamin Wittes Gives a Talk at Parliament on Whether Drones are the New Guantanamo

    Lawfare's editor in chief, Benjamin Wittes, gives a talk at the Palace of Westminster--sponsored by the Henry Jackson Society--on whether drones are becoming the new Guantanamo.
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
5.4K Ratings

5.4K Ratings

yossarian1983 ,

Great policy-focused news analysis

This is a great program for wonky discussions of federal legal and national security policy. I’ve listened since 2019 and my only criticism is the frequent lack of opposing opinions on the show. It can be a bit of an echo chamber of voices who’ve spent careers within the foreign policy/national security world and at times some discussions can sound comically disconnected from the experiences of regular people, but it’s enlightening to hear these candid perspectives from the elites of the policymaking world. The latest episode with author Spencer Ackerman breaks that echo chamber a bit and introduced some evocative debate to the program. I think it’s one of their best episodes yet so if you’re new to Lawfare that’s a great place to start.

JCMargerison ,

If only they could hear themselves.

The cognitive dissonance is comical to the objective listener. Listening to them try to convince each other of the consistency of their positions while repeating proven fallacies is hilarious. One tentatively points out an inconsistency, begging to be corrected. The other repeats the same failed argument at increased volume, and the first mumbles “I see, of course that makes sense.” These intellectuals have been broken by Trump.

Andrew Roqud ,

The Disgruntled Data Broker

I am a fan & avid listener of this podcast. With that preface I must say it’s a shame there is always some one out there who finds the need to villainize good business. The data broker episode had a clickbait headline if I have ever seen one. Nothing in this episode proved that our industry is a “national threat”. The biggest aggregator is actually the government itself. There are more no sign warrants & subpoenas forcing data companies to turn over location data and violate privacy rights to us citizens simply to see who was where, & when. I can tell you what. I highly doubt there are many instances where military member/government officials information is sought with nefarious intentions in mind.
Lastly you made no mention of current legislation already in place with which data being sold for different industries and uses has to be generated/aggregated in a compliant fashion. For example those health insurance companies must be listed in a websites privacy policy and terms and conditions that consumers agree to the moment they fill out their information.

Talk about something else.
You made ZERO effort to back up this clickbait Title.
-A Data Broker

Top Podcasts In Government

Listeners Also Subscribed To