862 episodes

The longest running independent international affairs podcast features in-depth interviews with policymakers, journalists and experts around the world who discuss global news, international relations, global development and key trends driving world affairs.

Named by The Guardian as "a podcast to make you smarter," Global Dispatches is a podcast for people who crave a deeper understanding of international news.

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters World News and Opinion

    • News
    • 4.8 • 266 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

The longest running independent international affairs podcast features in-depth interviews with policymakers, journalists and experts around the world who discuss global news, international relations, global development and key trends driving world affairs.

Named by The Guardian as "a podcast to make you smarter," Global Dispatches is a podcast for people who crave a deeper understanding of international news.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    A Nobel Peace Prize Juror Explains How He Selects The Winner

    A Nobel Peace Prize Juror Explains How He Selects The Winner

    There are just five people in the world who decide the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Asle Toje is one of them. In this special episode of the podcast he gives a rare behind-the-scenes account of how they decide the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize -- and reveals some controversies that have arisen over the years.

    Why is Turkey About to Invade Syria?

    Why is Turkey About to Invade Syria?

    On November 13, six people were killed in a bombing in Istanbul, which the government of Turkey blamed on a Kurdish militant group based in Northern Syria. Shortly thereafter, Turkey began targeting Kurdish positions in Syria and Iraq, with President Erdogan threatening an imminent ground invasion of Northern Syria. 
    In this episode, we speak with Lisel Hintz, assistant professor of international relations a the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, to discuss this bombing and this escalating conflict, which comes amid a profound shift in Turkey's relationships with other countries in the region.
    We begin by talking about what we know about the November 13th attack and the Turkish government's attempt to control the narrative before having a broader conversation about how this crisis informs, and is informed by, recent changes in Turkey's foreign policy. This including a warming of relations with former regional adversaries like Egypt, the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Syria. Lisel Hintz also explains the domestic political considerations that may be driving Erdogan's decisions on the use of force in Syria ahead of elections next year
    ---
    Podcast announcement:
    Regular listeners will recall this that summer we announced that the podcast had received a grant from Building a Stronger Future, Inc the family foundation of Sam Bankman-Fried. In case you are unaware Sam Bankman-Fried is the founder of the FTX cryptocurrency exchange and professed effective altruist whose company declared bankruptcy in November. Needless to say, the grant, which was to be for three years will not be extended.
    The show will keep on keeping on. But we now need the support of our dedicated audience. There are two ways you can support the show. If you are listening to this on Apple Podcasts, you can become a paying subscriber with a few taps of your finger. Alternatively, you can visit Patreon.com/GlobalDispatches and sign up for a premium subscription. In both cases, you will unlock access to our entire archive featuring hundreds of episodes. You will also be helping to ensure that the show continues to thrive for the longterm. So please do take a moment to support out work by subscribing on Apple Podcasts or signing up on Patreon.com/globaldispatches - and if you sign up on Patreon, as an added bonus, we will gladly send you a sticker in the mail.
    https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches 

    • 33 min
    What Political Science Teaches Us About the World Cup and World Peace

    What Political Science Teaches Us About the World Cup and World Peace

    There is political science research determining that international sporting events like the Qatar World Cup makes the outbreak of international conflict more likely.

    I interviewed the author of a peer reviewed study that found a rather significant correlation between success in the FIFA Mens World Cup and an outbreak in conflict. The political scientist Andrew Bertoli created a data set of every world cup from 1958 to 2010 and found that countries that qualified for the World Cup were significantly more likely to start an international conflict than countries that did not quality.  The study we discuss was titled Nationalism and Conflict: Lessons from International Sports appears in the December 2017 issue of the journal International Studies Quarterly. 
     
     
     
    https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches

    Senator Jeanne Shaheen on Congressional Support for Ukraine and Shoring Up Democracy in The Balkans | Live from the Halifax International Security Forum

    Senator Jeanne Shaheen on Congressional Support for Ukraine and Shoring Up Democracy in The Balkans | Live from the Halifax International Security Forum

    Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat from New Hampshire, lead a large bi-partisan Congressional delegation to the Halifax International Security Forum in Halifax, Nova Scotia in mid-November. We just days after the US House of Representatives was confirmed to flip to Republican control following the US mid terms. With that change in power comes a degree of uncertainty around the extent to which Congress can be relied upon to continue its support for Ukraine's defense. 
    Senator Shaheen discusses how Congress' approach to Ukraine may change when the Republicans gain control of the house next year, as well as the situation in the western Balkans, where Senator Shaheen recently returned from an official trip to the region in which she observed the Bosnian elections. She explains how Russian meddling may undermine democratic gains in the region and how Congress can better support democracy in the region. 

    • 13 min
    Meet Jamila Afghani, 2022 Laureate of the Aurora Prize For Awaking Humanity

    Meet Jamila Afghani, 2022 Laureate of the Aurora Prize For Awaking Humanity

    In this episode, we speak with Jamila Afghani, the 2022 Laureate of the Aurora Prize For Awaking Humanity, which is a prestigious annual award conferred to grassroots human rights defenders. 
    Jamila Afghani is a the founder of the local Afghan NGO Noor Educational and Capacity Development Organization, which among other things supports girls education in Afghanistan. She founded the organization as a refugee in Pakistan but then established it in Afghanistan just months after the Taliban were ousted from power in 2001. For the last twenty years, her NGO has supported girls and women throughout Afghanistan -- and even today, with the country back under Taliban, the work continues. 
    In our conversation, Jamila Afghani explains how and why she began work as a civil society leader, which also includes a leadership position with Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She also discusses how she fled Afghanistan in August 2021 and continues to lead her NGO, but now as a refugee in Canada.

    • 23 min
    Better Know John Maynard Keynes

    Better Know John Maynard Keynes

    John Maynard Keynes died 74 years ago, but his ideas are surprisingly relevant to understanding the world today. Though primarily known for his pioneering economic ideas, a new biography shows Keynes profound influence on international relations -- an influence that can be felt to this day. 

     Zachary Carter, Senior Reporter with HuffPost and author of the The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes, discusses Keynes' impact on international relations and why his ideas are still sparking debates about the relationship between economics and peace today.  
     

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
266 Ratings

266 Ratings

IAdcl ,

Recommend

I’ve been listening for years, probably my first podcast I really started to listening to right as I was getting out of college. If you are interested in global development, intl relationship, social science, history, current geo-political topics, etc…this is the place for you.

bibliophile_VA ,

Insightful podcast

As someone who works in international development, I greatly appreciate this podcast. The discussions are insightful and informative. The podcast production value is high. And I really like the breadth and depth of the coverage.

imelda26 ,

Great podcast!

I was looking for a podcast to keep me more informed with what goes on in the world. I came across this one and I’m happy to have found it! Great topics being discussed and it’s very non-biased and great host!!

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