25 episodes

The podcast about Louisiana literature, history, and culture, from its roots until now.

Louisiana Anthology Podcast Bruce R. Magee & Stephen Payne

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 69 Ratings

The podcast about Louisiana literature, history, and culture, from its roots until now.

    428. Harvey Kaye, Part 1

    428. Harvey Kaye, Part 1

    428. Part 1 of our interview Harvey Kaye about Huey Long, FDR, and the New Deal. Harvey is an American historian and sociologist. Kaye is an author of several political books including “Thomas Paine and the Promise of America”, and “The Fight for the Four Freedoms.” He has appeared as an expert on several political news shows and podcasts including “Bill Moyers Journal” and “That’s Jacqueline”. Kaye is a Professor Emeritus of Democracy & Justice Studies and the Director of the Center for History and Social Change at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay. This week in Louisiana history. August 1, 1804. The Pelican Girls arrived in Mobile. France sent 27 girls from respectable families to the new colony aboard the Pelican. This week in New Orleans history. Oliver Morgan was born in New Orleans on May 6, 1933. He was born and raised in the Lower Ninth Ward, alongside Fats Domino, Jessie Hill and Smiley Lewis. In 1961, he released his debut single on AFO Records under the pseudonym "Nookie Boy." In 1964 he released his only national hit "Who Shot The Lala" which sings about the mysterious situation surrounding the death of singer Lawrence "Prince La La" Nelson in 1963. The recording session took place at Cosimo Matassa's studio with Eddie Bo at the piano. Following the success of the song, Morgan went on a tour nationally, but eventually settled as a local singer appearing at local clubs and festivals. He also had a day job working as a custodian at City Hall and as the caretaker of the New Orleans Pharmacy Museum on Chartres Street. In 1998, he released his first and only full length album I'm Home from Allen Toussaint's Nyno label. Toussaint gave him full support providing songs and producing the album. Morgan's Lower Ninth Ward home was destroyed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and he evacuated to Atlanta with his wife to stay with their children. Morgan died in Atlanta from a heart attack on July 31, 2007. He had not performed since he had evacuated from New Orleans. This week in Louisiana. Sculpture Garden a Folk-Art Gem in Chauvin Along the banks of Bayou Petit Caillou in Terrebonne Parish, a lighthouse guides visitors to a treasure of modern American folk art.The lighthouse, made of 7,000 bricks and decorated with sculptures, is just the beginning of a journey through the world of Kenny Hill, a bricklayer who left behind more than 100 chauvin sculpture garden lighthouse in louisianaconcrete sculptures on his bayou-side property in Chauvin, Louisiana. Ranging in subject from angels, cowboys, God, soldiers, children and Hill himself, the sculptures depict the artist’s spirituality and his struggle with growing personal pain. Postcards from Louisiana. Maude Caillot and the Afrodiziacs play at Dos Jefes Cigar Bar. Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.  

    427. Mike Bunn. West Florida

    427. Mike Bunn. West Florida

    427. We interview Mike Bunn about his book on West Florida, Fourteenth Colony: The Forgotten Story of the Gulf South During America's Revolutionary Era. “Mike Bunn has written the first thorough history of West Florida, a British colony in America during the era of the American Revolution. Fourteenth Colony is good history and a good read, and it adds significantly to our knowledge of colonial America and the Revolutionary War.” — John Ferling. The British colony of West Florida—which once stretched from the mighty Mississippi to the shallow bends of the Apalachicola and portions of what are now the states of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana—is the forgotten fourteenth colony of America's Revolutionary era. The colony's eventful years as a part of the British Empire form an important and compelling interlude in Gulf Coast history that has for too long been overlooked. The colony's history showcases a tumultuous political scene featuring a halting attempt at instituting representative government; a host of bold and colorful characters; a compelling saga of struggle and perseverance in the pursuit of financial stability; and a dramatic series of battles on land and water which brought about the end of its days under the Union Jack. This week in Louisiana history. July 24, 1769. Alejandro "Bloody" O'Reilly reclaimed New Orleans for Spain. This week in New Orleans history. Disnelyland's New Orleans Square opened in July 24, 1966. New Orleans Mayor Victor H. Schiro participated in the dedication ceremony. Schiro announced Walt Disney had been made an honorary citizen of New Orleans; Disney joked the addition cost as much as the original Louisiana Purchase. This was Walt Disney's last major public appearance at Disneyland before his death in December 1966. This week in Louisiana. Things to Do With Kids: Greater New Orleans The Crescent City and surrounding areas are perfect destinations for family getaways. Here are some of our top picks for kid-friendly fun in and near New Orleans. New Orleans is wild, funky and free-spirited. It’s known for phenomenal music, some of the best food in the world and is believed to have more historic districts than any other city in the country. But did you know that it’s also a great place to bring children? That’s right, you can trade in your Bourbon Street all-nighter for a whole lot of family fun. Postcards from Louisiana. Beasts of Bourbon play at the Famous Door Bar.Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.

    426. Coushatta Baskets, Part 2

    426. Coushatta Baskets, Part 2

    Episode 426. Part 2 of our interview with Denise Bates and Linda Langley about Coushatta Baskets and the people who make them. Louisiana Coushatta Basket Makers brings together oral histories, tribal records, archival materials, and archaeological evidence to explore the fascinating history of the Coushatta Tribe’s famed basket weavers. After settling at their present location near the town of Elton, Louisiana, in the 1880s, the Coushatta (Koasati) tribe developed a basket industry that bolstered the local tribal economy and became the basis for generating tourism and political mobilization. The baskets represented a material culture that distinguished the Coushattas as Indigenous people within an ethnically and racially diverse region.  This week in Louisiana history. July 17, 1795. First bishop of New Orleans, Don Luis Cardenas, arrives in Louisiana. This week in New Orleans history. July 17, 1976, ZZTop performed at Tulane Stadium. This week in Louisiana. Tabasco Hot Pepper Sauce is Bottled on Avery Island Louisiana's Cajun Country is home to the world's favorite hot sauce. Avery Island, the birthplace of Tabasco Brand Products including TABASCO® pepper sauce, has been owned for over 180 years by the interrelated Marsh, Avery and McIlhenny families. Lush subtropical flora and venerable live oaks draped with wild muscadine and swags of barbe espagnole, or Spanish moss, cover this geological oddity, which is one of five "islands" rising above south Louisiana’s flat coastal marshes. Postcards from Louisiana. Maude Caillot and the Afrodiziacs play at Dos Jefes Cigar Bar. Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.    

    425. Coushatta Baskets, Part 1

    425. Coushatta Baskets, Part 1

    Episode 425. Part 1 of our interview with Denise Bates and Linda Langley about Coushatta Baskets and the people who make them. Louisiana Coushatta Basket Makers brings together oral histories, tribal records, archival materials, and archaeological evidence to explore the fascinating history of the Coushatta Tribe’s famed basket weavers. After settling at their present location near the town of Elton, Louisiana, in the 1880s, the Coushatta (Koasati) tribe developed a basket industry that bolstered the local tribal economy and became the basis for generating tourism and political mobilization. The baskets represented a material culture that distinguished the Coushattas as Indigenous people within an ethnically and racially diverse region. This week in Louisiana history. July 10, 1941. Legendary jazz pianist and composer Jelly Roll Morton (born in New Orleans) died in Los Angeles. His musical innovations accelerated the development of jazz. This week in New Orleans history. On July 10, 2010, during their 35th-anniversary performance at New Orleans' Mahalia Jackson Theater, the band Zebra was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. This week in Louisiana. Grambling University Eddie G. Robinson Museum The museum is now housed in the former Women’s Memorial Gymnasium, which underwent a major renovation. The free, 9,000-square-foot museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and contains videos and interactive exhibits. Be sure to stop by the Pro Room, which highlights the more than 300 players who went on to play professional football under the tutelage of Coach Robinson. Postcards from Louisiana. A jazz singer in Jackson Square.Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.   

    424. Clint Bruce. Afro-Creole Poetry.

    424. Clint Bruce. Afro-Creole Poetry.

    424. We interview Clint Bruce, author of Afro-Creole Poetry in French from Louisiana’s Radical Civil War–Era Newspapers:A Bilingual Edition. Collected here for the first time, seventy-nine poems published in the Civil War-era Afro-Creole New Orleans newspapers L'Union and La Tribune--most unavailable anywhere but in archives--bring to life a close-knit, politically progressive French-speaking community of artists and intellectuals whose cultural and legal legacies were monumental. The original French poems appear here alongside Clint Bruce's sensitive English translations, mindful of meaning, meter, and sound. A comprehensive introduction, biographies of the poets, and extensive annotations immerse readers in Civil War-era Louisiana. In his research for the volume, Bruce unearthed crucial issues of La Tribune long thought lost and discovered the extent of a poetic hoax undetected for nearly 150 years. This week in Louisiana history. July 3, 1870. The riverboat Robert E. Lee defeated the Natchez in a race on the Mississippi. This week in New Orleans history. Pierre Dewey LaFontaine, Jr. was born in New Orleans on White Street between Dumaine and St. Ann on July 3, 1930. As a child battling frequent respiratory infections due to weakened lungs, a local doctor advised his father to purchase a wind instrument -- Pete chose a clarinet. He took private lessons and played at McDonogh 28 school. After gigs with Monk Hazel and Al Hirt. he founded The Basin Street Six in 1950 with his longtime friend, trumpeter George Girard. He married Beverly Lang on October 27, 1951. National fame came when he  joined the Lawrence Welk Orchestra. Upon returning to New Orleans, he played with The Dukes of Dixieland, then began forming his own bands. The New Orleans Jazz Club declared "Pete Fountain Day" on October 19, 1959. He opened his club at 800 Bourbon Street in the spring of 1960. A founder of The Half Fast Walking Club and a true New Orleans character, he was awarded an honorary degree by Loyola University New Orleans in 2006. On March 18, 2007, Pete Fountain was inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. This week in Louisiana. Louisiana Culinary Trails Map Use this map to discover Louisiana’s eight culinary trails and start planning your tasty journey. You’ll be dining like a Louisiana local in no time. Creole Crescent Come taste why New Orleans is lauded for some of the most inventive and delicious food in America. Tammany Taste A feast of fresh produce and seafood prepared by culinary icons Capital Cravings Baton Rouge rallies local fare with worldwide flair Bayou Bounty Make room for a spicy adventure Seafood Sensation Riding the Gulf waters, Southwest Louisiana brings trails of fresh seafood and boudin Prairie Home Cooking A scenic byway of vintage towns packed with homestyle cooking and dance halls Red River Riches Clear your calendar for an epicurean journey and sample a global menu Delta Delights Grab a map and head for the hills for a feast of southern delights Postcards from Louisiana. Maude Caillot and the Afrodiziacs play at Dos Jefes Cigar Bar. Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.

    423. Ken Miller

    423. Ken Miller

    423. We talk to Ken Miller of Lafayette. He has become interested in local politics in recent years. Ken is the founder of the Blackthorn PAC, which is actively raising and spending on comprehensive media and digital campaigns to shed light on elected officials or those running for office that were in support of, or involved in, the January 6 insurrection. With your support, Blackthorn PAC will combat the treasonous disinformation and un-American behaviors continuing to do harm, destroying our democracy.  Ken has been in Lafayette for 40 years. He owns the Blackrose Group, nationally known business brokerage company based in Lafayette, with offices in San Antonio, Houston, Dallas Philadelphia, Atlanta.This week in Louisiana history. June 26, 1805. Former V.P. Aaron Burr arrives in New Orleans. This week in New Orleans history. June 26, 1927. Bonnabel Place opens. North and South Turnbull drives, running from the the Earhart Expressway (named for former New Orleans Commissioner of Public Utilities, Fred A. Earhart) to the lake are named for Joseph F. Turnbull, the real estate developer who was touting lots in the new Bonnabel Place subdivision on June 26, 1927. Running from Metairie Road to the lake, Bonnabel Place was owned by heirs of Parisian chemist Henri Bonnabel who had come to New Orleans in 1825.  He had purchased the eleven arpents wide (an arpent is a French unit of measure which is slightly smaller than a acre) property from Hypolite deCourval in 1836.  It ran from the river to the lake. This week in Louisiana. Things to Do With Kids: Baton Rouge Area The Baton Rouge area blends historical attractions with places to play. Here are some of our top kid-friendly picks for families. Not only is Baton Rouge steeped in history, but it offers an array of kid-friendly museums, plantations, memorials and historic sites as well. Itching to get outside? Hike the trails at Tunica Hills or view the nation’s largest bald cypress at Cat Island. Afterwards, cool off by splashing around in Blue Bayou Waterpark. Postcards from Louisiana. A jazz singer in Jackson Square.Listen on iTunes.Listen on Google Play. Listen on Google Podcasts. Listen on Spotify. Listen on Stitcher. Listen on TuneIn. The Louisiana Anthology Home Page. Like us on Facebook.   

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

JewelleH ,

Great for people who love history

I love history and historical information about different states. Louisiana is in its on category when it comes to all the other states. These podcasts will be a great add on in history class or even during your leisure time.

Katmcats ,

Best podcast ever!

Very informational.

MEKmommy ,

True Louisiana

There is nothing more Louisiana than this podcast. Everything from the topics to the discussions to the informal recording. It just really represents not only who Louisiana is, but how we get things done.

Top Podcasts In Arts

Listeners Also Subscribed To