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Season 3: In 1984, a father of three disappeared while working at a mysterious Cincinnati plant. It turned out he’d met a gruesome fate: Pieces of bone, his eyeglasses and walkie-talkie were uncovered inside a vat that reached 1350 degrees Fahrenheit. Two months later, the Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was revealed to have been processing uranium – and polluting the region. The dead man’s children believe their father was murdered because he intended to expose how the plant had been releasing millions of pounds of uranium dust into the atmosphere. We’re hoping to figure out: Did 39-year-old David Bocks kill himself, as Fernald officials alleged, or was he more likely killed?

Season 2: A soft-hearted prison minister was found killed in her Kentucky apartment, and Newport police zeroed in on an ex-convict she’d counseled. Thirty years later, the conviction is overturned and the case is once again unsolved. The Cincinnati Enquirer investigates: Was William Virgil wrongly convicted for murder?

Season 1: When Elizabeth Andes was found murdered in her Ohio apartment in 1978, police and prosecutors decided within hours it was an open-and-shut case. Two juries disagreed. The Cincinnati Enquirer investigates: Was the right guy charged, or did a killer walk free?

Accused Wondery

    • Verkliga brott
    • 4.1, 27 betyg

Season 3: In 1984, a father of three disappeared while working at a mysterious Cincinnati plant. It turned out he’d met a gruesome fate: Pieces of bone, his eyeglasses and walkie-talkie were uncovered inside a vat that reached 1350 degrees Fahrenheit. Two months later, the Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was revealed to have been processing uranium – and polluting the region. The dead man’s children believe their father was murdered because he intended to expose how the plant had been releasing millions of pounds of uranium dust into the atmosphere. We’re hoping to figure out: Did 39-year-old David Bocks kill himself, as Fernald officials alleged, or was he more likely killed?

Season 2: A soft-hearted prison minister was found killed in her Kentucky apartment, and Newport police zeroed in on an ex-convict she’d counseled. Thirty years later, the conviction is overturned and the case is once again unsolved. The Cincinnati Enquirer investigates: Was William Virgil wrongly convicted for murder?

Season 1: When Elizabeth Andes was found murdered in her Ohio apartment in 1978, police and prosecutors decided within hours it was an open-and-shut case. Two juries disagreed. The Cincinnati Enquirer investigates: Was the right guy charged, or did a killer walk free?

Kundrecensioner

4.1 av 5
27 betyg

27 betyg

Becka Eriksson Jensen ,

Engaging and extremely thrilling

I just love your work with this podcast. I’m completely hooked. To be able to follow cold cases in depth like this is an adventure, with a lot of emotions following. Keep the good work up!

othoml ,

Wildly irresponsible

Everyone wants to be the new Serial. Accused is one of the worst examples of New Journalism I have experienced. The most frequent word in this series is a pronoun in the first person singular. I, me, mine. The story is secondary, what matters is the journalist’s experiences working with the story. I’m not interested in hearing the disingenuous hemming and hawing of someone reading from a script. This is the death of journalism.

The big difference between Serial and Accused is that the former focuses on exonerating a convicted person (or at least raising reasonable doubt) while the latter is primarily about pointing the finger at possible - and named - perpetrators (combined with the mandatory police cover up conspiracy theory).

Sure, they throw in a perfunctory caveat about how they don’t want speculation in the media. And then they continue to speculate for the rest of the season. Remember, these are people who have not been charged with - or even suspected of involvement in - a murder.

This would be excusable had the podcast been produced by amateurs in some basement. But Accused is done by supposedly experienced journalists from a regular media outlet. It’s as if standard journalism practises cease to exist as long as it’s done in a podcast. Even an amateur true crime podcast like Casefile manages to get this right.

The last episode contains a Q&A and it’s telling how upset the journalist (Hunt) and her producer get with someone - a real journalist no less - having the gall to criticize their work, not even letting him finish his point. Hunt’s reply says everything. It’s perfectly clear that she has gone native and is no longer a journalist, she’s an investigator working for the victim’s family. The result is that she has cast aside all journalist principles for what I’m sure she percieves as the greater good.

(Reviewed after season 1, not likely to listen to season 2)

Colasmurfen78 ,

Please return for another season!

Loved this show and reakly hope the team will take on another case!

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