10 avsnitt

What do you need to start a nuclear power start-up? How do you build a company from cutting-edge research? And how do you convince Venture Capitalists to support your quantum computing company?
Deep tech companies are based on significant scientific or engineering challenges, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, nuclear fission and every other crazy thing you can and cannot yet imagine.

My name is Philipp. Currently, I am a PhD student in theoretical physics and in Deep Tech Stories, I explore the tech and stories behind exciting start-up founders and researchers in the deep tech space.

You can find more on deeptechstories.io

Deep Tech Stories Philipp Stürmer

    • Teknologi
    • 5,0 • 1 betyg

What do you need to start a nuclear power start-up? How do you build a company from cutting-edge research? And how do you convince Venture Capitalists to support your quantum computing company?
Deep tech companies are based on significant scientific or engineering challenges, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, nuclear fission and every other crazy thing you can and cannot yet imagine.

My name is Philipp. Currently, I am a PhD student in theoretical physics and in Deep Tech Stories, I explore the tech and stories behind exciting start-up founders and researchers in the deep tech space.

You can find more on deeptechstories.io

    Wilbe COO Devika Thapar on building a Home for scientific entrepreneurs (Part 1)

    Wilbe COO Devika Thapar on building a Home for scientific entrepreneurs (Part 1)

    The start-up news is dominated by headlines of who got how much funding, so it seems as if funding is the only thing that you need to succeed. But if you look at a few of the previous guests, a lot of them struggled one step earlier. Vultus Robert Schmitt started out with flying Drones over fields, before switching to satellite pictures. Aslak Stubsgaard had the benefit of funding Copenhagen Atomics with experienced founders and Jacinto of Peafowl Solarpower was forwarded to the university accelerator after he figured out how to turn his research into transparent solar cells.
    So it's not always about getting the most money as fast as possible, but particularly in the beginning about knowledge of how to certain things like finding and fleshing out your idea, legal and business issues.
    That's where Devika Thapar comes in. Devika is COO of Wilbe, a self-described home for scientific entrepreneurs, where they help scientists that think about turning their research into a company to build up that foundational knowledge in building a company or maybe even getting funding.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/deeptechpod (https://twitter.com/deeptechpod)
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories (https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)
    Design by Amadeus Schwed:
    https://elementsofpuremotion.com/ (https://elementsofpuremotion.com/)
    nN5PWFssSoivlcM265ZG

    • 30 min
    Jacinto Sá on the first steps in building a company from research (Part 2)

    Jacinto Sá on the first steps in building a company from research (Part 2)

    In the last episode of "Deep Tech Stories", Jacinto Sá explained Peafowl Solarpowers proprietary solar cell technology. We explored how the plasmonic approach completely differs from a normal solar cell and how they make it transparent. (Can go a bit longer here) However, we didn't touch on how they went from their original research to starting a company.
    In general, there are quite a few things to consider. How does one know it is a viable product? How does one find the first customers? And how does one deal with signing a patent while being employed by the university? All those are things Jacinto was first wondering and had to solve. That's when he made contact with the incubator at Uppsala University, which explained Sweden's unusual stance on intellectual property.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/deeptechpod (https://twitter.com/deeptechpod)
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories (https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)
    Design by Amadeus Schwed:
    https://elementsofpuremotion.com/ (https://elementsofpuremotion.com/)

    • 37 min
    Professor Jacinto Sá explains the new physics of his transparent solar cells (Part 1)

    Professor Jacinto Sá explains the new physics of his transparent solar cells (Part 1)

    Ever since the first photovoltaic cell in 1954 by Bell Labs, the basic principle behind the technology stayed the same. Exploiting the photoelectric effect, first explained by Einstein in his miracle year of 1905, a light-particle can kick out an electron of a material if it has just the right energy. Through the smart combining of two types of semiconductors, this electron leads to a current in the material, which in the end can be used. Now while over the decades the efficiency of photovoltaics increased a lot, they still rely on the same principle and we only found better materials or ways of engineering.
    However, Jacinto Sá, Professor of Physical Chemistry at Uppsala University Sweden and CTO of startup Peafowl Solar power has found another way, which is seemingly independent of the incoming light frequency and can be used for transparent solar cells. The resulting material relies on so-called Plasmonics, is only 300nm thin and can be used to power and recharge small devices or dynamic glass.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Twitter: https://twitter.com/deeptechpod (https://twitter.com/deeptechpod)
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories (https://www.linkedin.com/company/deeptechstories)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)
    Design by Amadeus Schwed:
    https://elementsofpuremotion.com/ (https://elementsofpuremotion.com/)

    • 38 min
    Part 2: Aslak Stubsgaard explains how to build a nuclear start-up and a unique approach to developing a reactor

    Part 2: Aslak Stubsgaard explains how to build a nuclear start-up and a unique approach to developing a reactor

    In the last episode, Copenhagen Atomics CTO explained the details of their breeder molten salt reactor. However, so far we left out how they started the company, funded operations for the last 6 years and their unique approach to building reactors, while simultaneously dealing with the legal and practical issues of wanting to deal with fissile material. But before that Aslak explains how he got into the topic of nuclear reactors and how he met his co-founders.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)

    • 18 min
    Part 1: Copenhagen Atomics CTO Aslak Stubsgaard on the fascinating Details of Breeder Molten Salt Reactors

    Part 1: Copenhagen Atomics CTO Aslak Stubsgaard on the fascinating Details of Breeder Molten Salt Reactors

    In a prior episode, I talked with Sean Kenny about so-called fourth-generation nuclear reactors. In particular, on their benefits and advantages compared to classical light-water reactors. However, we didn't talk about how companies build those new nuclear reactors. Oddly enough it is not that hard to build a light-water reactor and keep it stable. We first added nuclear reactors to the power grid in the 1950s ... without the help of a computer. Yet nowadays it is quite common for a construction time of up to 10 years. Far beyond anything reasonable in an economy of scale to make a dent in energy production and climate change.
    That is another point where fourth-generation nuclear reactors differ from their conventional siblings. Due to the way they work, a variety of architectures and power outputs is possible, where seemingly every startup has its own approach. One of them is Copenhagen Atomics, attempting to build a 100 MW reactor on an assembly line, and their CTO Aslak Stubsgaard, explains how they build their reactors.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)

    • 31 min
    Professor Caterina Doglioni on the Hunt for Dark Matter, Career Decisions and the Academic Environment

    Professor Caterina Doglioni on the Hunt for Dark Matter, Career Decisions and the Academic Environment

    When most people think about particle accelerators like CERN, they don't necessarily think of useful innovation with societal impact. It's just theoretical tinkering without much real-world application after all. However, this couldn't be further from the truth. Improvements in particle accelerators that were necessary to discover new physics lead to many inventions over the years. Among the most prominent stand the majority of modern medical imaging technology and the internet, allowing for a huge playground for deep tech companies.
    With the much-awaited discovery of the, in 1954 proposed, Higgs particle in 2013, the so-called standard model of particle physics was considered to be completed. Yet, particle physicists like Professor Caterina Doglioni in Lund keep innovating and improving their techniques to go beyond the standard model and explain the so-far elusive Dark Matter.
    If you enjoyed this episode, why not recommend it to a friend?
    Homepage: https://www.deeptechstories.io/ (https://www.deeptechstories.io)
    Music by Nathaniel Drew x Tom Fox:
    https://www.nathanieldrew.com/ (https://www.nathanieldrew.com/)
    https://tfbeats.com/ (https://tfbeats.com/)

    • 56 min

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