300 avsnitt

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Outlook BBC

    • Personliga dagböcker

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

    I was a teenager at Auschwitz

    I was a teenager at Auschwitz

    Holocaust survivor Dita Kraus is now 90 years old, but she was only 14 when she was taken to the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz in Poland. She worked in the children’s hut and she’s now known as the ‘librarian of Auschwitz’. Dita remembers being desperately hungry and cold, but along with her mother she survived her time there. After coming face to face with SS doctor Josef Mengele they were sent to Bergen-Belsen, another concentration camp, where she saw many people starving to death. Eventually the British army liberated the camp and they were freed, but Dita’s trials were not over. She tells Emily Webb her remarkable story. Dita has written a book about her experience called ‘A Delayed Life: The true story of the Librarian of Auschwitz’.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: June Christie

    Photo: Dita Kraus
    Credit: Courtesy of Dita Kraus

    • 41 min
    The student who became my son

    The student who became my son

    Teacher and principal Tim King was working in a school in Chicago when he met a student named Keith. Their relationship changed when Keith’s mother died after struggling with drug addiction and Tim knew he had to help. Eventually Keith moved in with Tim and although it wasn’t always smooth sailing, Keith finally got the chance to be a kid and Tim learnt how to be a dad. Today, they work together running schools to give other disadvantaged young people an education.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Mariana Des Forges

    Photo: Teacher Tim King
    Credit: Courtesy of Urban Prep Academies

    • 19 min
    Our secret tunnel that saved the city

    Our secret tunnel that saved the city

    Edis Kolar guarded a lifesaving tunnel built in the basement of his family home during the siege of Sarajevo. The secret passage provided a safe way to move people and supplies in and out of the surrounded Bosnian city. Edis tells Outlook's Mariana Des Forges how he lived in the tunnel house for the whole war, alongside other soldiers and his grandmother who refused to leave, helping the thousands who crossed through the passage every day. When the war ended Edis turned his home into a museum to honour the ‘Tunnel of Hope’ that saved the city.

    Presenter & Producer: Mariana Des Forges

    Picture: Edis Kolar at the 'Tunnel of Hope'
    Credit: BBC / Mariana Des Forges

    • 18 min
    The virtuoso musician detained as a child

    The virtuoso musician detained as a child

    Today, Leon Bosch is one of the most respected classical double bass players in the world but as a teenager he was made a political prisoner in South Africa because of his peaceful resistance to the apartheid regime – an experience that has haunted him for most of his life. But that time in prison also drove him to commit to playing the double bass with a passion; he speaks to Jo Fidgen about how he has used his music to resist a system that said he would never amount to anything.

    Presenter: Jo Fidgen
    Producer: Nathan Gower

    Picture: Double-bass player Leon Bosch
    Credit: Photography Juno Snowdon / Art Direction Adam Hypki

    • 23 min
    The black woman who cared for a Klansman

    The black woman who cared for a Klansman

    Stephanie Summerville tells us about her eye-opening experience as a casual worker. It was her first job and it thrust her into a shocking situation. She was providing respite care for a terminally-ill man in her hometown of Evansville, in Indiana. As she looked around his bedroom she saw a white robe and a hood with eyeholes cut out. Stephanie was a young black woman and this was the unmistakable uniform of the Ku Klux Klan.

    Presenter: Mariana Des Forges
    Producer: Deiniol Buxton

    Picture: Stephanie Summerville
    Credit: BBC

    • 26 min
    Life as a lone identical twin

    Life as a lone identical twin

    Identical twins David and John Loftus had an idyllic and happy childhood. They were so alike that as toddlers you could hardly tell them apart. They were very close growing up together. But after a cricket injury and subsequent brain scan, they discovered that John had a brain tumour. David struggled but he remained strong for his brother. John did beat the tumour, but contracted meningitis soon afterwards. During his treatment, a medical error left John in a coma. He died a few days later. After his death, David had to rebuild his life alone. He changed his career and eventually had a family of his own. He tells Emily Webb how he coped with John's death and how a book about his experience, Diary of a Lone Twin, is his love-letter to his brother.

    Presenter: Emily Webb
    Producer: Katy Takatsuki

    Picture: Identical twins David and John Loftus
    Credit: Courtesy of David Loftus

    • 22 min

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